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Thread: Canoeing from Leeds.

  1. #1

    Default Canoeing from Leeds.

    Hi
    My girlfriend and I had our first trip down the River Whafe on Sunday. We went from Burley in Whalfsdale to Castley, it took us about 3 hours and was good fun. We are based in Leeds. I am new to canoeing in this region and am after some advice on where else is good to paddle?
    I have done a bit around North Wales (mainly in the sea) but the landscape is a bit different around here…
    Any advice would be appreciated.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lincolnshire
    Posts
    464

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    Can't help i'm afraid, but glad you had a good day out.

    Rob

  3. #3

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    hello
    there is quite good! skipton down toKeighley is a good trip!
    and Keighley to Bingley is fun too! there are a couple of weirs though but they are easily portaged!

    Antony

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    865

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    Hello, depends what level your at and what type of stuff you like to paddle. Similar grade and close to the trip you describe might be:- Wharfe from addingham to Otley or Boston Spa to Tadcaster. Ure from below Slenningford falls to Ripon. Have a search for Ure, Nidd, Ouse and Yorkshire Derwent in Blogs section and see if anything takes your fancy. If you like flat there's a whole heap of canal trips around here worth a look too.

    Enjoy

    Mark


    I used to think i was in love and then i bought a Supernova


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    westyorks
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Hi this may help you out


    have fun
    Mick

    BINGLEY CIRCULAR CRUISE. (River Aire & L&L Canal)A BWB licence or BCU/WCA membership sticker is required and you
    should check that there are no problems on the river section with the
    Local Access Officer.
    Set in the foothills of the Pennines the busy little town of Bingley is a good
    site from which to undertake a canoe trip. Much of Bingley is an island set
    between the river in the south and the Leeds-Liverpool canal to the north.
    The industrial landscape of this part of the Aire valley provides a
    picturesque and pleasantly surprising recreational canoeing experience.
    The trip is essentially one of contrasts from the moving water of the Aire
    to the placid waters of the Leeds-Liverpool canal, from the industrial mill
    chimneys to the rural landscape on the fringe of Bingley. The journey
    takes approximately two hours, much depending on river levels and group
    ability. The river stretch is approximately 2.5 miles, the canal stretch
    approximately 1.25 miles - a total of 3.75 miles. The river grade under
    normal conditions ranges from 0 to 2 excluding weirs. There are many
    overhanging trees near the river bank and these may pose a potential
    problem for the inexperienced or, unwary paddler, particularly at high water
    levels. There is usually a clear path down the centre of the river. The Aire
    is slightly polluted and care should be taken to avoid unnecessary contact
    with the water.
    22
    Directions
    Take the A650 road from Bradford to Keighley. This main road runs through
    the centre of Bingley and forms part of the main street. Turn off the A650
    opposite Bingley Fire Station, onto the A629 road to Halifax. Here, one
    enters a quaint, narrow street called Millgate, with the Old White Horse
    public house on the right. Within 50 ft the road crosses the River Aire on
    a stone bridge. Immediately after crossing the bridge take the first right
    turn, opposite the Brown Cow Inn, into a street of terraced houses. Turn
    immediately right again and follow the track down to where a gantry carries
    pipes over the river just above the weir. This is the launching point, please
    ensure that vehicles are parked at the side of this track. Do not obstruct
    as access is required to premises further on.
    The beauty of this trip is that the start and the finish as within five minutes
    walk of each other. It is advisable to take vehicles to the finishing point
    and walk back to the start. Access to the finishing point is to turn down the
    track, turn left opposite the Brown Cow, over the bridge, turn right at the
    traffic lights into Bingley Main St., follow the road until a set of traffic
    lights are reached almost opposite Bradford & Bingley building society
    on the right. Turn left at these lights into Ferncliffe Rd., then take the first
    left into Chapel Lane and the first right down Midland Hill into the car park
    at the bottom, next to the canal. A metro water bus stop on the canal bank
    marks the end of the canal trip and is near to an access point from the
    canal into the car park. The walk back to the start takes approximately
    five minutes.
    The river trip
    A good launching point is twenty feet or so upstream from the metal gantry
    across the river, once afloat and drifting downstream Bingley weir is
    encountered. There is not usually enough water to shoot the weir, canoes
    can easily be carried over or land on the left hand side. When the river
    level is high a stopper develops at the weir base. Once past the weir and
    under the road bridge, the river narrows somewhat. Overhanging trees
    on the banks, whilst making the trip more picturesque, do pose a potential
    problem: particularily in high water, for the unwary. The best course is
    23
    down the centre of the river. A quarter of a mile downstream from the
    start, the river passes through Myrtle Park. In extreme flood conditions,
    the metal bridge here can appear very low. A quarter of a mile after this
    bridge and after rounding a bend Harden Beck joins the Aire on the right.
    At the same point there is an island in the centre of the river, this should
    be passed on the right hand side. There is an obstruction in the river bed
    which can be difficult to pass in low water. Almost half a mile beyond this
    point one reaches Cottingley Bridge, which carries the main A650
    Bradford-Bingley road over the river. Just over a quarter of a mile below
    this bridge is a shingle bank. The current flows sharply to the left and
    under some trees - take care here, particularly with inexperienced paddlers
    - it is potentially dangerous. The next major landmark down the river is
    Hirstwood Railway Bridge. After the bridge, the river swings to the left, an
    eddy on the
    right enables an inspection of the water ahead to be made. A broken weir
    and stepping stones, with small standing waves. Rocks lie below the
    surface, these rapids mark the end of the river section.
    Just after the rapids the Seven Arches Aqueduct can be seen. Land on
    the righthand bank well upstream of the aqueduct and, preferably before
    the sewage works on the left. A track takes one to a small footbridge over
    a stream and up onto the top of the aqueduct. Total paddling time to this
    point is approximately one hour.
    The canal cruise
    The Seven Arches Aqueduct is an impressive structure and carries the
    Leeds-Liverpool canal over the River Aire. The aqueduct was designed
    by Mr J Longbottom, who also designed the famous three and five locks
    at Bingley. This section of the canal was opened in 1774.
    The cruise along the canal back to Bingley is the most tranquil and leisurely
    part of the journey and disturbed only by the occasional barge or water
    bus. The canal takes a much shorter and more direct route than the river;
    from the aqueduct the journey takes about one hour. The first and only
    obstacle is Cowley Gap locks, less than a quarter of a mile from Seven
    Arches Aqueduct. A portage round is necessary. Paddling down the canal

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mickcave View Post
    Hi this may help you out


    have fun
    Mick

    BINGLEY CIRCULAR CRUISE. (River Aire & L&L Canal)A BWB licence or BCU/WCA membership sticker is required and you
    should check that there are no problems on the river section with the
    Local Access Officer.
    Set in the foothills of the Pennines the busy little town of Bingley is a good
    site from which to undertake a canoe trip. Much of Bingley is an island set
    between the river in the south and the Leeds-Liverpool canal to the north.
    The industrial landscape of this part of the Aire valley provides a
    picturesque and pleasantly surprising recreational canoeing experience.
    The trip is essentially one of contrasts from the moving water of the Aire
    to the placid waters of the Leeds-Liverpool canal, from the industrial mill
    chimneys to the rural landscape on the fringe of Bingley. The journey
    takes approximately two hours, much depending on river levels and group
    ability. The river stretch is approximately 2.5 miles, the canal stretch
    approximately 1.25 miles - a total of 3.75 miles. The river grade under
    normal conditions ranges from 0 to 2 excluding weirs. There are many
    overhanging trees near the river bank and these may pose a potential
    problem for the inexperienced or, unwary paddler, particularly at high water
    levels. There is usually a clear path down the centre of the river. The Aire
    is slightly polluted and care should be taken to avoid unnecessary contact
    with the water.
    22
    Directions
    Take the A650 road from Bradford to Keighley. This main road runs through
    the centre of Bingley and forms part of the main street. Turn off the A650
    opposite Bingley Fire Station, onto the A629 road to Halifax. Here, one
    enters a quaint, narrow street called Millgate, with the Old White Horse
    public house on the right. Within 50 ft the road crosses the River Aire on
    a stone bridge. Immediately after crossing the bridge take the first right
    turn, opposite the Brown Cow Inn, into a street of terraced houses. Turn
    immediately right again and follow the track down to where a gantry carries
    pipes over the river just above the weir. This is the launching point, please
    ensure that vehicles are parked at the side of this track. Do not obstruct
    as access is required to premises further on.
    The beauty of this trip is that the start and the finish as within five minutes
    walk of each other. It is advisable to take vehicles to the finishing point
    and walk back to the start. Access to the finishing point is to turn down the
    track, turn left opposite the Brown Cow, over the bridge, turn right at the
    traffic lights into Bingley Main St., follow the road until a set of traffic
    lights are reached almost opposite Bradford & Bingley building society
    on the right. Turn left at these lights into Ferncliffe Rd., then take the first
    left into Chapel Lane and the first right down Midland Hill into the car park
    at the bottom, next to the canal. A metro water bus stop on the canal bank
    marks the end of the canal trip and is near to an access point from the
    canal into the car park. The walk back to the start takes approximately
    five minutes.
    The river trip
    A good launching point is twenty feet or so upstream from the metal gantry
    across the river, once afloat and drifting downstream Bingley weir is
    encountered. There is not usually enough water to shoot the weir, canoes
    can easily be carried over or land on the left hand side. When the river
    level is high a stopper develops at the weir base. Once past the weir and
    under the road bridge, the river narrows somewhat. Overhanging trees
    on the banks, whilst making the trip more picturesque, do pose a potential
    problem: particularily in high water, for the unwary. The best course is
    23
    down the centre of the river. A quarter of a mile downstream from the
    start, the river passes through Myrtle Park. In extreme flood conditions,
    the metal bridge here can appear very low. A quarter of a mile after this
    bridge and after rounding a bend Harden Beck joins the Aire on the right.
    At the same point there is an island in the centre of the river, this should
    be passed on the right hand side. There is an obstruction in the river bed
    which can be difficult to pass in low water. Almost half a mile beyond this
    point one reaches Cottingley Bridge, which carries the main A650
    Bradford-Bingley road over the river. Just over a quarter of a mile below
    this bridge is a shingle bank. The current flows sharply to the left and
    under some trees - take care here, particularly with inexperienced paddlers
    - it is potentially dangerous. The next major landmark down the river is
    Hirstwood Railway Bridge. After the bridge, the river swings to the left, an
    eddy on the
    right enables an inspection of the water ahead to be made. A broken weir
    and stepping stones, with small standing waves. Rocks lie below the
    surface, these rapids mark the end of the river section.
    Just after the rapids the Seven Arches Aqueduct can be seen. Land on
    the righthand bank well upstream of the aqueduct and, preferably before
    the sewage works on the left. A track takes one to a small footbridge over
    a stream and up onto the top of the aqueduct. Total paddling time to this
    point is approximately one hour.
    The canal cruise
    The Seven Arches Aqueduct is an impressive structure and carries the
    Leeds-Liverpool canal over the River Aire. The aqueduct was designed
    by Mr J Longbottom, who also designed the famous three and five locks
    at Bingley. This section of the canal was opened in 1774.
    The cruise along the canal back to Bingley is the most tranquil and leisurely
    part of the journey and disturbed only by the occasional barge or water
    bus. The canal takes a much shorter and more direct route than the river;
    from the aqueduct the journey takes about one hour. The first and only
    obstacle is Cowley Gap locks, less than a quarter of a mile from Seven
    Arches Aqueduct. A portage round is necessary. Paddling down the canal
    We did this last year, and we decided it was easier to get in lower down - possibly near the park.

    It avoided the weir and everything else which looked "messy".

    I think the instructions where written before the by-pass went through !

    But it is a nice trip out, and our only problem was making sure we headed off on the canal the right way!

    Trevor

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