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Thread: Venture Ranger 16

  1. #1
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    Default Venture Ranger 16

    Makers Spec



    Length:16' 490cm
    Width: 33" 90cm
    Weight: 66lbs 30kg
    Depth: ?
    Capacity: 992lbs 450kg

    Makers Write Up

    Venture Canoes Ranger 16 Canadian style open canoe for sale from The Ranger 16 is an excellent value open canoe ideal for many uses. It is large enough to take 2 or 3 people on journeys or is ideal for 1or 2 people taking plenty of camping kit along. It is made from a polyethylene sandwich construction that is extremely tough and maintenance free and it will even float if filled with water. Ideal for canals, lakes, sheltered coastal waters, rivers. For use on rough or open water we strongly recommend the fitting of buoyancy bags.

    Two Wood and webbing seats are fitted as standard with a 3rd optional centre seat also available. Choice of seat constructions is also available.
    • Polyethylene sandwich construction
    • Large capacity, versatile for group of couple use
    • Three-layer foam corelite
    Last edited by Canoe Guru; 8th-August-2007 at 09:42 PM.

  2. #2

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    A lot of people don't like the Ranger 16 because of its appearance however A ranger 16 has taken me lots of places and I've done lots of things in it - grade 3 white water, lakes, canals. Its a great platform for variety boating and now its in the Corelite plastic its even lighter than most other PE, sub 800 boats.

    A great all rounder with great maneuverability and stability.

  3. #3
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    I've got a Ranger 16 in the old plastic (so it's very heavy), and mainly use it solo. I began canoeing a couple of years ago in this boat, and it's great for building confidence as it's very stable. For solo paddling I did add a centre seat which made a massive difference to how it handles in wind.

    The boat has been brilliant fun for the last two years, and i think makes a perfect beginner/family boat. I'm now moving onto moving water and as a solo paddler am about to change to something a little smaller in Royalex. Although I can get the boat on and off the car, the weight means I can't carry it. However, if weight isn't so much of an issue, and if you want to paddle tandem often or want a safe and stable boat it may well be ideal.

    Advantages
    - Stable
    - Able to carry a large load
    - Withstands a lot of abuse!
    - Usable solo and tandem
    - Tracks well
    - Turns/draws etc nicely on flat water
    - Confidence building
    - Newer Corelight versions are lighter than other plastic boats
    - Cheaper than royalex

    Disadvantages
    - Heavy
    - A bit too wide at the centre seat to make cross-side strokes easy
    - Hard to get moving solo, and seems slower than some other boats
    - Slightly odd looking from certain angles!










  4. #4
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    Great reviews, I've been impressed by Venture, they seem to make very practical and useable canoes, without the frightening price tag.

    Main point of the post, are those width figures correct? My ranger 14 measures at around 34.5 inches (rather than the stated 35.5) which still makes it wider than the figure at the top of the page for a boat 2' longer.

    Some say his trousers are made of royalex and that he warps time and space as he breathes (which might explain the figures above), we just know he's called the Guru!

  5. #5
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    Default

    i had been looking for a boat for ages since returning to the uk from Australia - to be honest i dismised these out of hand and kept looking for a more expensive 2nd hand boat -
    how foolish - after hiring utter rubish i bought one very reasonably priced (new) and am extreemely impresed - i agree with everything said already and would add that the construction is good - the finish is excellent and the price well - i got a package deal - 2 ba's 2 paddles some dry bags a roof mounting kit for my van etc - all in 790 - I reckon the boat cost us 600 - i will get most of that back if i sell it on ebay!

  6. #6
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    I've had my Ranger 16 for a couple of months now (used 3 or 4 times per week). I'm new to canoeing so I cant compare with other boats. However I can say I am impressed with the flexibility of the boat, I've used it Solo, tandum and with three adults. It carries plenty gear. It's easy to paddle and steer. With a bit of thought it's easy to get on and off roof rack; solo. The cost won't bankrupt you. I think it looks great. It feels very stable. I only wish I had bought one years ago

    Mark

  7. #7

    Default Mark, you're not alone

    Like Mark, I too tended to think the Ranger was 'just a workhorse' - we use them to teach Sea Cadets. But now, having looked at a number of different, supposedly up-market boats, I've come back to the simple fact that the Ranger will do everything I want, competently. Unfortunately, there still doesn't seem to be too many boats you can say that about.
    So my wife and I will be paddling a Ranger before too long - fortunately a much lighter one than we teach in - but then the cadets are much younger than we are !!!

  8. #8

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    Hvaving had one for a few months (the old plastic) yes it is heavy, but great sole and tanduam.

    I using ti both on flat water and white water, and sucessfully (i.e. no swims) did the lower trywryn sunday with my partner (a few domestics on route!)

    We bith love the boat for what it is a versitle GP.

  9. #9
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    Default Venture Ranger 16

    I'm getting to the point where I can't put off buying a boat any longer. My mate has a Ranger 16 and we've enjoyed some great days on the Endrick, Devon and Forth rivers. Nothing very dramatic except the broken weirs(?) just before Stirling that we got through more by luck than any paddling skills. I'm beginning to think that the stability of the boat may have played a large part in our staying upright and dry.
    I intend to paddle tandem on day trips on easy rivers and lochs, and to go solo for a few hours on the Devon and nearby lochs. I'm a complete newbie to solo paddling. I need to be able to lift the boat on and off the car myself. I couldn't do this with my mates Ranger 16, but I think he has one of the old heavy platic ones.
    Do you guys think the 14 or the 16 would be the better choice? or should I go for someting completely different?
    Price is a consideration.

    Hawkeye (the noo)

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye View Post
    I'm getting to the point where I can't put off buying a boat any longer. My mate has a Ranger 16 and we've enjoyed some great days on the Endrick, Devon and Forth rivers. Nothing very dramatic except the broken weirs(?) just before Stirling that we got through more by luck than any paddling skills. I'm beginning to think that the stability of the boat may have played a large part in our staying upright and dry.
    I intend to paddle tandem on day trips on easy rivers and lochs, and to go solo for a few hours on the Devon and nearby lochs. I'm a complete newbie to solo paddling. I need to be able to lift the boat on and off the car myself. I couldn't do this with my mates Ranger 16, but I think he has one of the old heavy platic ones.
    Do you guys think the 14 or the 16 would be the better choice? or should I go for someting completely different?
    Price is a consideration.

    Hawkeye (the noo)
    I have a 14 and love it. the better I paddle the more I like it. The ranger 14 is reasonable quick to turn, tracks OK and is a very stable platform to cut your teeth poling.

    I will never sell my Ranger as it does everything I demand of its bombproof. I now have a reflection 15 and a carbon Mega on order. Yet still see myself paddling the Ranger 14 as often as the others.
    Last edited by wayne; 1st-April-2008 at 01:06 PM. Reason: incoherent post

    Bushcraft Survival and First Aid Training.

  11. #11
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    I have owned both the 14 and the 16 and the difference is remarkable. The 14 is rigid, tracks well, turns nicely and forgives most mistakes. The 16 on the other hand is prone to oilcan, and although it provides a good stable platform it it cumbersome in comparison.

  12. #12
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    Unhappy Ranger 16

    What is oilcan ?
    Bandy

    CLICK THE LINK TO THE SCOTTISH CANOE TRIPS CHANNEL FOR VIDEOS OF MY TRIPS : http://www.youtube.com/user/bandy598



  13. #13
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    Question Ranger 14

    Oilcan? What's that?

    I see that some reviews suggest that the 14 can't cope with the combined weight of two middle-aged gentlemen and some essential munchies and drinkables for the day. Any thoughts peeps?

  14. #14
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    Default

    imagine taking your Irn Bru can and squishing it slightly, on some boats the water pressure can do that to your hull, it's normally minor and comes out if you leave in the sun for a short time (apparently!)

    disclaimer - Not tried this or seen this but this is my understanding of what oilcaning is.

    cheers,

    Alan
    Cheers,

    Alan


  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye View Post
    Oilcan? What's that?
    Oilcanning is where the bottom of the boat flexes as it moves through the water, particularly over waves or ripples. Not always a problem but generally perceived as undesirable and not nice to watch. Some hulls seem to do it more than others. Ideally a boat will work best if it maintains its shape as much as possible in all water conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye View Post
    I see that some reviews suggest that the 14 can't cope with the combined weight of two middle-aged gentlemen and some essential munchies and drinkables for the day. Any thoughts peeps?

    The Ranger 14 is not huge, but I really don't see why it would not cope with this use. It is very high sided so freeboard will not be a problem. It's so stable that I can't see two adults causing it any worries really.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye View Post
    I see that some reviews suggest that the 14 can't cope with the combined weight of two middle-aged gentlemen and some essential munchies and drinkables for the day. Any thoughts peeps?
    Our Ranger 14 takes me (13+ stone) and my strapping (don't tell her I said that) teenage daughter plus a couple of large kit bags with no problem. I am planning to do some camping weekends in the summer and anticipate it carrying all our kit without any problems although it might be stacked up a bit due to the shorter length! You shouldn't have any problems with just your munchies etc
    Regards

    Purley Paddler

  17. #17
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    Question

    Okay, guys, I get "oilcan", though haven't been aware of it on my pal's Ranger 16. But what is "freeboard"?

    Is there a SOTP dictionary somewhere? If there ain't, maybe someone should compile one for newbies like me.

    I'm leaning toward the Ranger 14 now, in Corelite, so thanks for the advice.



    Hawkeye

  18. #18
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    Hia

    Freeboard is the distance between the water line and the top/bottom of the gunwale. This will vary from boat to boat and with the amount of balast (pork pies and beer)being carried. The more freeboard generally the drier the you will stay, but there are also dissadvantages in that you have to reach over more with your paddle and added weight. Depends on the type of paddling /water you are doing / on. There is a search function on the forum which is very useful.

    I have a Ranger 16 (old heavy version) and I have never had any problems with oilcanning. I have seen ones that do, old and new versions, some do, some (most I think) don't. It is kind of agreed that oilcanning doesn't really affect performance, but I don't like it.

    I almost exclusively paddle my 16' solo. It is heavy (like I said, old version) and the biggest pain is getting it back on top of the van after a long paddle. When soloing it is slow to get up to speed and isn't massively manoeuvrable (as many tree will attest to), but isn't a dog either. It tracks fantastically and is incredably stable (as you know).

    I have also paddled Waynes 14' jobbie. In comparison it isn't actually much lighter and took a lot more work to keep it in a streight line. On the flip side it was much more manouverable and more suitable for moving and narrow water. I used to hate Rangers, but am now a convert, great allrounders and good value.

    I have just got a pure solo boat, but that is mostly for flat water paddling. I still totally intend tou use my Ranger 16 solo on bouncier, scrapier water.

    Endless River were doing some second quality 16 and 14s at a discount. Might be worth checking to see if they have any left (and haggling a bit on the price): http://www.endlessriver.co.uk//produ...b1dd736fc60b58

    Joel
    Last edited by joel; 2nd-April-2008 at 07:26 PM.

  19. #19
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    Default Venture 16

    Thanks for the info on oilcanning . Not got that problem so far. In fact really happy with the ranger 16 . Planning a few days on Loch awe shortly . Hopefully still be happy with it.

    Hawkeye noticed you're from Dollar ....know it well was brought up there and still alot of friends and relations around the village !
    Bandy

    CLICK THE LINK TO THE SCOTTISH CANOE TRIPS CHANNEL FOR VIDEOS OF MY TRIPS : http://www.youtube.com/user/bandy598



  20. #20
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    Default Venture Ranger 16

    I think I'll go with the 14. In green, of course. Thanks for all the help guys.

    Bandy. Coincidence, but we used to live in Gargunnock, before moving to Dollar. I can recommend the Forth from the Bridge at Gargunnock to the car park just at Craigforth. A long lazy paddle. Give the broken weir at Craigforth a miss though.


    Hawkeye

    "And thou shalt have a paddle"

    Deuteronomy Ch23 v13

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    I've had a Ranger 16 for a number of years now and have been very happy with it.

    It's solid as a rock, stable and dependable. Very tough, taken many batterings on river rocks with no problems. Good tracking and fast enough with 2 paddlers.

    It really comes into its own for family trips and camping expeditions etc. I've had 2 boys, a husky, and all our camping gear in it, with no problems. Great load carrying capacity.

    The only slight drawback is it's fairly heavy. I mean for lifting it onto the car roof and carrying it down to the water. But for 2 people that's no problem really. Once in the water it's fine.

    As for its looks - well it looks fine to me!

    I love my Ranger, it's been a great boat for me, and I'm sure it will be for many years to come.


  22. Default Ranger 16

    crow has hit the nail on the head.i have had my RANGER 16 for a few years now and have used it for canoe camping, shooting wiers,long distance trips and carrying a heavy load. me ,my son and my brother,thats more weight than i care to admit to! the lightest one of us is over 15 stone.
    it does tend to oilcan but that does not seem to effect the speed.and i also think that it is a lovely looking canoe.so try one, i don't think you will be dissapointed.
    KEEP PADDLING!
    RHYMSEY.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkeye View Post
    I see that some reviews suggest that the 14 can't cope with the combined weight of two middle-aged gentlemen and some essential munchies and drinkables for the day. Any thoughts peeps?
    had a 14 stone mate in the bow and myself weighing in at an athletic 15 stone in the stern + a daysack with butties crisps and pop in my Ranger 14 with no probs whatsoever. Also there was a resonable amount of space left for camping gear etc.

    I would have liked the 16ft one but my requirements where:

    1) As light as possibe (without breaking the bank on a royalex craft) for solo car topping and portage.
    2) Tandem (to take my son or daughter along + weekend cam gear & food)
    3) Managable solo with more gear instead of kids.
    4) Durable (to run a few grade1 or 2 when I get better)

    So the Ranger14 suited me just fine.
    Two up it feels small but capable.
    Solo it doesn't feel too big.
    At 28Kg it must me one of the lightest non royalex tandems you can get.
    Yes I think I'd like the 16ft version, but do I need the extra space? maybe not.
    I know I don't need the extra weight! and by all accounts the handling sounds better on the 14.

    Kind regards,
    Shedman.

    PS. Please take any advice with a big pinch of salt as I have never tried out any other boat.

  24. #24
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    Well, I got my Ranger 14' last year and have been very pleased with it. It's light (Corelite) and quite manouverable on moving water. I use it tandem and one day might have the courage (if not the technique) to go solo on some flat water.
    My mate and I have taken it down the Endrick and across Loch Lomond to Balmaha on a choppy day and we managed fine. Recently we had a go from Kingussie to Aviemore, and that was no problem.
    My mate has a Ranger 16' and it is quite different from my 14'. For a start his is made from the older plastic and is much much heavier than mine. It is a bit of a tanker on moving water, but great in a straight line and on choppy water. We took it to Loch Etive recently and had a ball. Crossing the loch was a little hairy at one point and we were glad of the extra weight and stability.
    In my opinion (and that's not worth much) the 14 is better for river trips (and probably solo paddling), but the 16 comes into it's own on big lochs and for carrying tons of camping gear.


    Hawkeye

    "And thou shalt have a paddle"

    Deuteronomy Ch23 v13

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    Our first impression and short video clip of our afternoon on the river Welland earlier today.

    Since buying our Venture Ranger 16 in January this year, the weather has not been too clever and instead we used the time to get her ready for the water.

    This includes the fitting of the centre seat, two buoyancy foam blocks and the manufacture of an electric outboard motor bracket.

    We already owned an electric outboard motor & leisure battery and just needed to devise a way to connect this to the canoe. I suffer from frozen shoulder throughout the year and need the ability to get back if the pain kicks in. Today it was fine, but needed to test everything all the same.

    Our Ranger 16 is made from Corelite, which is meant to be lighter than the earlier models.

    First impressions are that the canoe is quite heavy now. The extra seat and buoyancy blocks may only weigh a little on their own, but add it all to the canoe that was borderline and it now means that a trolley will definitely help if the water is more than 30-yards away!

    That said, on the water, it is light and doesn't take much to get her moving.

    What struck me the most was how stable the canoe is. No fears of going in, which was a bonus considering how cold the water was and that none of us were wearing wet or dry suits!

    After getting out, a quick wipe down with a cloth and it was as good as new and minutes later, back on top of the car and we were off back home.

    I am very impressed with this canoe. Okay, I haven't got much to compare it with as my background is in sailing dinghies, but the canoe feels hard wearing, with no hidden surprises in it's handling characteristics.

    I have just ordered an Expedition rig from Solway Dory and look forward to experiencing canoe sailing for the fist time in the months to come.

    So far, I don't regret our purchase in the slightest.


  26. #26
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    Thought I would add an update to this thread following a summer of using my Venture Ranger 16.

    It has been fully upgraded and converted into a respectable sailing canoe, which can be left bare and used as the original paddling canoe.

    I moved my centre seat to just behind the centre yoke, which works better during solo paddling or when sailing.

    I fitted a sailing thwart and mast foot just behind the front seat and have bought a pivoting leeboard that bolts to the centre yoke and can be removed in seconds with a few wing nuts.

    Two side airbags were fitted following a capsize on Hickling Broad where I found that too much water was left in the canoe after righting it again.

    I built a home-made rudder transom out of some plywood and mounted a Lark rudder and tiller to it for better control when sailing. This just bolts to the back of the canoe using a steel bar that fits under the gunwales and takes a minute to fit/ remove.

    The 35 square foot sailing rig came from Solway Dory as did the leeboard and pulls the canoe very well, even upwind giving excellent sailing performance.

    The Venture Ranger 16 seems virtually indestructable and still looks like new 8-months after buying it, yet it has been sailed/ paddled on the river Welland twice, at Ferry Meadows 6-times, Rutland Water 4-times, Hickling Broad & Barton Broad.

    It's not a light canoe weighing over 40kgs, but in the water it handles well, is more stable than most and is a real load carrier.
    The freeboard is an inch higher than I would like when paddling solo on windy days as it gets pushed around a little, but a little more weight in the front will minimise this.

    If you are new to canoeing (As I was) and want something tough & hard wearing for those little accidents that will happen and you want something that you don't have to be embarassed to take out among more experienced canoeists later once you have got the hang of it, the Venture Ranger 16 would be a safe bet as long as you know that they are not light out of the water.

    Some images and video footage below.




    Last edited by Steamerpoint; 3rd-September-2011 at 12:35 AM.

  27. #27
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    Default 40kg ?

    Is that extra weight due to the sailing rig ? My ranger 16 is 32 kg perhaps a different year of manufacture or something . Do agree they are fine canoes and i reckon a good choice in the price range .

  28. #28
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    Is that extra weight due to the sailing rig ?
    To a large degree yes it is. Since I bought it, I have fitted two foam buoyancy wedges, two side airbags, a centre seat and a mast thwart plus mast foot. All of these items stay in to canoe even if it is being used for conventional paddling.

    When in sailing mode, I add the transom, rudder, leeboard thwart, leeboard, mast, sail & spars, all of which must add another 15kgs, taking the total weight up to around 55kgs!!!

  29. #29

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    I've got a ranger 16, got it for 450 off ebay from a shop on the south coast, bournmouth i think, it has served me fantastically for the last 5 years. i have canoed it on placid rivers, choppy estuary and also the open ocean. ok, a gusty wind makes it skate over the waves if you are on your own and the bow isn't weighed down, but with 2 in it its just great. almost every trip i make is a camping trip and its got a great amount of room in it for this. usually its me and my mate, and my dog, and kit and food enough for 3 days, and it copes easy. now and again there are 3 of us in there, and on one occasion we had 4! its heavy, but i have a trolley to transport it from car to launch point, and also a karitek roofrack, that allows me to load it easily on my own. a great canoe, for a really cheap price.

  30. #30

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    I too have a Ranger 16 and have spent many a happy day out on the water. It is a little on the heavy side for portage, but once you have the technique for getting it on your shoulders, it is manageable solo. I simply turn the canoe upside down, lift it up one end, and shift down to the yoke in the middle.

    The length of the 16 model is very handy in choppy conditions. When the wind is whipping up waves, the canoe tends to bridge the peaks, helping to stabilise the boat and reduce pitching. It is also a very robust canoe, and can withstand a lot of wear and tear. I recently had it out on a partially frozen loch, and it comfortably took on the role of ice breaker, with barely a scratch.

    The only criticisms I have are it's tendency to 'oil-can' due to it's fairly flat hull, and difficulty at times to keep it tracking a straight line. I often have to put in corrections with the paddle to compensate, but I am rarely in a hurry so it's all part of the experience!

  31. #31
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    Having recently bought a Ranger 16 I have to add to the positive reviews. Most of my canoe paddling has been in our club's Disco 158s and I owned one for a while. Despite the small difference in weight, the Ranger feels way more manoeuvrable, responsive and faster in a straight line then the Disco. It performed well in a solo session on the rapids at Symonds Yat and feels like it is good for G3.

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    Im just in negotiations for one of these. Heres hoping ill get it. It will be my 1st canoe.!!

  33. #33

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    Good luck Raybennett.
    Last edited by Ranger3; 25th-April-2012 at 10:00 PM.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybennett View Post
    Im just in negotiations for one of these. Heres hoping ill get it. It will be my 1st canoe.!!
    Good luck indeed.

    You know everytime I get inside my canoe, especially in choppy conditions, I'm really impressed with how little water it takes on and how stable it is.

    It's also really strong. Take a look at this video of it being sailed. I am hanging out in pretty strong winds and you can see how the mast is trying to twist the canoe by pushing the gunwales in one direction and the floor of the canoe the other way. (Look around the 18-minute mark) There are no lateral supports keeping it ridged and all the loads are taken up through the skin.



    The shape of the canoe also makes it very stable, but to spin it quickly, you do need to heal it over onto it's side.

    One negative though apart from the extra kg's in weight, the flat bottom can make it hard to track straight when paddling solo especially if there is any wind, but then I'm not a strong paddler and this might come down to technique!

  35. #35
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    Are the ranger 16's from 2004 before they were called venture as strong? Im not to fussed about weight. Cheers. Hes after 500. But im the sole bidder on it at alot less so far. Its along way of and i have to cinsider this. Im half hoping i dont win it and judt go to btookbank and get a new novacraft sp3 prospector.

  36. #36
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    I paid 550 on ebay for the newer venture model , but this came with 2 airbags ,3 pfd , 3 wooden paddles (grey owll etc) all in good condition . Sb

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybennett View Post
    Are the ranger 16's from 2004 before they were called venture as strong? Im not to fussed about weight. Cheers. Hes after 500. But im the sole bidder on it at alot less so far. Its along way of and i have to cinsider this. Im half hoping i dont win it and judt go to btookbank and get a new novacraft sp3 prospector.
    Have just paid 475 for a 16 and 425 for a 14 (price included the seller dropping it off). Both decent boats, might have got a little cheaper on eBay, but isn't that always the way.

    The 550 all in deal above looks like a bargain.

  38. #38
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    Congradulations. I'm sure you won't regret going for Venture Ranger's and they'll serve you well for years and years.

  39. #39
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    I ended up getting an ex demo venture 16 prospector from kayalnw for 550. Its got less scrapes than i will make the first time i use it. They also had a 16 for similar money. Im over the moon. Hopefully christen her tomorrow. :-)B-):-D

  40. #40
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    Recently purchased a secondhand 16ft pyranah ranger,the wife and i love it not forgetting our rescue dog jenny.

  41. #41
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    Hi All,

    I am new to this and have some money to spend on a canoe.

    I am looking at getting one of these as a starter canoe. I will mainly be using it to tour up and down the flatwaters of the UK, I live near the Thames(henley/marlow/maidenhead/reading area) so I will be starting out on these stretches of water.

    I have no desire at this stage to be white water canoeing and really see myself as a canoe/camper.

    It seems that most of you are happy with this canoe and from what I've seen it looks like its the one for me but before I splash the cash are there any others to consider?

    Thanks

    Butch

  42. #42
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    There are many canoes that could be suitable and will offer a similar experience to this.

    I'd see what's available at your budget and canvas opinion in the main forum.

    I have owned a venture ranger 16 and whilst i did enjoy its stability i never really loved it due to it oilcanning (the hull rippling as we paddled). I am aware that many owners haven't experienced this and it could vary between boats but because of this i didnt hang on to it for long.
    I found the Venture 14 to be a much better boat but, you'd be comprimising on load capacity with this so i'd not recommend this too you.

    Have you considered one of the old town models or an Apache Tribe? These are also readily available and worth a look.
    To Canoe is to be moved!!!

  43. #43
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    Ive been on SotP for a while now, and Ive had a Ranger 16' for much much longer. So I feel its time to add to this thread..
    It is heavy but bomb proof and very stable.
    Yep its 'oil canned' and yep Ive had to replace a few popped off gunwhale rivets with stainless screws and rawplugs (works just fine).
    But shes my lovely old Ranger and does everything I require very well..

    Usage...mostly flatwater fishing at sea and a little surf play!

    Regards tracking issues.. News to me??

    TB..
    ........Enthusiastically incapable .

  44. #44
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    The Venture Ranger makes a pretty good sailing canoe too as the video below demonstrates.
    The flat bottom increases stability making the canoe behave in a predictable manner. You know, like driving a well built car, a VW golf for example. Not the fastest car around, not the most expensive and a little on the heavy side, but no hidden surprises. You know when you put it hard into a corner, it's going to get you round without suddenly lurching into a skid!

    The Ranger 16 has reliable handling throughout most of its normal operation and the fact that it will oil-can a little is just down to it's flat bottom. It's no big deal. It is just that the central section of the floor bulges up a few inches when sat in the water and it will oscillate as it passes over the waves, but this flat bottom is making the canoe stable and the oil-canning does nothing to spoil the enjoyment of canoeing.

    It also has a fair bit of freeboard (distance from the waterline to the top of the gunwales) which makes it a fairly dry canoe. When the wind picks up though, you will notice that the wind is pushing you about quite a bit. Something to watch, but this is the case with most canoes anyway.

    If you are starting out then a stable canoe is what you should be looking for. If you plan to take kids, pets, the elderly or just want a stable canoe for a spot of fishing, messing about on a Sunday afternoon, the Ranger 16 would be a sensible choice.

    Clubs, Scout groups and canoe rental/ training centers love them.

    Two things are against these canoes though.

    1. They are about 5 kgs heavier than most 16 foot canoes, so ideally you could do with a second person to help you lift it up onto the car roof if you are of average strength.

    2. That flat bottom that makes it stable in normal operation has a sharp chine as the sides turn back towards the gunwales. This means that when it is banked over steeply on it's side, as can be experienced in sailing, it will reach a point where it becomes unstable and twitchy. Just something to be aware of.

    The current construction is Corlite. This is basically a plastic/ foam/ plastic sandwich construction and gives the canoe some buoyancy if it is ever capsized. The canoe is therefore unlikely to sink to the bottom, however it will not support the weight of it's occupants if it is full of water. I would therefore recommend the fitment of a couple of bow & stern airbags if you plan to buy a Ranger 16 and take it out beyond a distance where the occupants could comfortably swim back to shore/ the river bank.

    Last edited by Steamerpoint; 12th-November-2012 at 12:24 AM. Reason: Typo

  45. #45
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    Thanks to all who have helped me out.

    I have purchased my Ranger 16 and will post up some pictures and adventures once I have them. I have had a centre seat put in and I'm just waiting to pick it up, so looking forward to getting out and about!

    Nice work there Steamerpoint, looks amazing! I take heed of your suggestions of stability. Its unlikely I will use it to sail, more of a canoe/camp at the moment but who knows!

    Cheers

    Butch

  46. #46
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    Still very happy with the Ranger 16. Originally thought I might have preferred their Prospector, but think the Ranger is the better boat for whitewater........discuss.

  47. #47

    Default New Boat

    After reading the opinions and advice voiced here I decided to purchase a Ranger 16 which I pick up tomorrow.

    My last boat was an OT Disco 158 which I said goodbye to nearly 20 years ago. Hopefully this will get me and the family back onto the water enjoying those long sunn midge free days which Scotland is famous for.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Columbus View Post
    After reading the opinions and advice voiced here I decided to purchase a Ranger 16 which I pick up tomorrow.

    My last boat was an OT Disco 158 which I said goodbye to nearly 20 years ago. Hopefully this will get me and the family back onto the water enjoying those long sunn midge free days which Scotland is famous for.
    Congratulations on the new boat, I really loved the 14 I had and when I swapped it for the 16 I was a little disappointed as the hull oil canned!

    I'm led to believe they've corrected this now hope you enjoy it!!
    To Canoe is to be moved!!!

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonehead59 View Post
    Congratulations on the new boat, I really loved the 14 I had and when I swapped it for the 16 I was a little disappointed as the hull oil canned!

    I'm led to believe they've corrected this now hope you enjoy it!!
    I've had two old Ranger 16's and neither of them oil canned.

  50. #50
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    Crow is offline こんにちは。私はカラスと私はスコットラ ンドの出身で す。 My location
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    Ditto, minus one.

    My Ranger was solid as a rock. In fact, it caused rocks to oil can!

    Moderate to poor, becoming good

    Crow Trip Log

  51. #51
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    The Ranger 16 is a great boat! I may have only used it a couple of times but it feels solid and is plenty big enough for all your kit and a couple of passengers.

    Congrats on the new canoe and enjoy!

  52. #52
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    Lots more footage of my tough Ranger 16 in action!


  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steamerpoint View Post
    Lots more footage of my tough Ranger 16 in action!

    Video Link: http://vimeo.com/55226574
    Wow.....that's a great video, very dramatic!!
    To Canoe is to be moved!!!

  54. #54

    Default

    i have the pyrana ranger 16 which hasn't let me down yet. its oil canned but its stable and gives a dry ride. have spent many hours in it and even slept under it.
    the only down side is trying to get it back on the car!!

  55. Default

    I bought a Venture Ranger 16 close to a couple of years ago and it has served well. It is a very stable canoe for family use and has ample space for two plus a load of camping gear etc. for weekend (or longer) camping trips. It is a bit of a beast to lift and car-top but thankfully my older son is now big enough to help out. Having the beast stored on a pulley and webbing strap system in the garage does help matters. No sign of oil canning so far and it paddles and tracks reasonably well when loaded and over the initial inertia in setting off. Paddling in winds can be a bit frustrating but loading up with gear and two paddlers reduces this effect. This beast is not a canoe that I would enjoy solo paddling but I expect owners/users may disagree.

    I am in the process of outfitting it for lake use e.g Lough Neagh and Lough Erne by lashing a large 'Pilates' ball at each end. I bought them on E-Bay for 6 each and they have burst 'technology'a in the form of a valve that simply releases when the balls are subject to a large person bouncing on them. Shouldn't have to worry about them bursting on the rare warm sunny days we have. Minor modification is being made to fit a securing leash to the valve to prevent it being lost if it pops. Lashing fittings of a combination of nylon & D rings and 'r' rings and gasketed rivets re being used. I have successfully used the nylon D rings and these special rivets (banana peel type finish at rear and gasket to prevent water ingress) for attaching carabiners and a cargo net. All fittings from H2O Kayaks

    The last modification for this season is addition of an aluminium and wood outboard mount (great price and outstanding customer service from Mark at Brookbank Canoes online site). This has been matched to a 2.5 HP four stroke outboard to be used for covering long distances and as a supplement to paddling. I have a long-standing shoulder injury that makes prolonged paddling less than enjoyable so the motor is going to help some.

    Purists may cringe but in my opinion anything that makes getting out on the water more amenable and enjoyable for the family and myself is something positive. I had thought of buying an electric trolling motor but the hassle of reduced run times and lunking heavy batteries put me off. I like the freedom of a petrol motor that can be run and refuelled using the same fuel I use for my stove and Northstar lamp. With good planning and practises any risks to safety from use and transport of flammable fuel should be greatly reduced. I might have to modify my avatar though :-)
    Last edited by Esox; 7th-May-2013 at 01:06 PM.

  56. #56
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    Esox, a canoe is a small portable boat no matter how you wish to propel it. Occasionally I paddle my Ranger 16, but most of the time I like to use wind power.

    Here is a short 3-minute video of it in action this weekend.



    This short clip is of it flying at around 8 or 9 knots in force 8-gusts! While it seem fairly tame, look how small the sail has been reefed down and watch the windsurfers blasting past!



    Other sailors with adapted canoes for sailing, require additional bracing to keep them straight, but my Ranger 16 seems fine.
    Sure they are heavier than many canoes, but built to last and take some punishment along the way!

  57. #57

    Default

    Steamerpoint, truly amazing videos of you and your Ranger 16 in action: skill, ingenuity (I would never have thought the Ranger could sail like this), superb video quality and content and the sheer exhilaration! I like your point about canoe being a small portable boat no matter how you wish to propel- sums it up in a nutshell. I must though, that of all the different means of propelling a canoe sailing one like you do does seem the best fun! Wishing you many happy days of sailing.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Esox View Post
    Steamerpoint, truly amazing videos of you and your Ranger 16 in action: skill, ingenuity (I would never have thought the Ranger could sail like this), superb video quality and content and the sheer exhilaration! I like your point about canoe being a small portable boat no matter how you wish to propel- sums it up in a nutshell. I must though, that of all the different means of propelling a canoe sailing one like you do does seem the best fun! Wishing you many happy days of sailing.
    Thanks Esox, glad you enjoyed the videos.

    Canoe sailing is truely adictive. Seriously adictive actually and the guys I meet up most months to go canoe sailing are a great bunch too, which makes the experience even better.

    On the subject of the Venture canoe when it comes to sailing. It's a tough old canoe and it seems to handle everything I throw at it.
    Last weekend, I was chatting with another open-canoe sailor (Important to differentiate given that many of the people I sail with use purpose built sailing canoes that sail brilliantly, but paddle less well) who has added some diaginal bracing to stop his canoe deforming under the loads applied to the canoe when sailing it. While his sail area is 9 square feet more than mine, my canoe seems very stiff with very little bending.

    The Ranger 16 is also quite a dry canoe sailing through some rough waters with reletively little water coming in over the gunwales. My only negatives link to the high freeboard (Which helps it stay dry) that can reduce it's ability to tack through the wind in strong wind conditions and the overall weight of the canoe when fully rigged. Two people would struggle to lift it out of the water fully rigged, so a trolley is essential when it comes to portaging.

    Sailing a canoe is actually fairly easy and if you already own a canoe, your very nearly there. To get started, I simply bought a cheap expedition rig from Solway Dory and I was away. It came with the mast thwart which was screwed under the gunwales with just two bolts and a mast foot which I glued below it on the floor. Took me an hour to do and once the glue had dried, I was off to the local pond for a spot of sailing.

    Using my paddle to steer at the back, I quickly mastered it. Why waste valuable energy paddling when you can use the wind. I couldn't paddle more than 3 or 4-miles with my damaged shoulder, but we regularly sail between 15 and 25-miles a day.

    This is one of my first ever videos using my paddle to steer. I had spent an extra 50 for a small leeboard that just clipped over the gunwale, to help me sail up wind, which can be seen in the video. Anyway enjoy. (PS. You get to see more of how I'm sailing in the last 30-seconds! It was hard sailing with one hand and filming with the other.)


  59. #59

    Default

    We've had our Ranger 16 for a few years now. It's a really really versatile boat, very capable both for touring and whitewater. Plenty of space for a couple of paddlers and a week's worth of kit. On open water it doesn't track quite as well as something like a Prospector, moves a little slower and is slightly more difficult to keep in a straight line. I'm not saying it's not good for touring, just that there are better boats for the same price. However. When the going gets bumpy the Ranger rules. It's tough (I've not had any oilcan problems) and it turns on the spot with flick of the paddle. It's an awesome whitewater boat.
    John

  60. #60
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    I would have thought it tracked much better than the prospector, most things do!
    "Sanity and happiness are an impossible combination"
    Mark Twain

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