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Thread: cedar strip canoes

  1. #1

    Default cedar strip canoes

    If youve build your own cedar strip canoe can you please post some pictures and tell me how much it cost you. Im looking into building one in teh next few months and would liek to see some before i make a decesion on what one ill be building. I bought gill gillpatricks book with teh free plans but would liek to see more ceader strip canoes befor ei commit to one and would also want to know the cost of the builds or any other info you might have on them.

  2. #2
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    Here's my build blog for what it's worth, most of the material was re-claimed so the main cost was the resin and cloth.

    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ght=strongback

    Good luck with the new build, I'm on my fourth now.

    Chestnut Bob

  3. #3
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    Have a look in the Gallery of homebuilt canoes thread. There's some fine examples of strippers in there. Mine's the cream one with my daughter sleeping in it. It's a Gilpatrick Laker with some mods to make the lines a bit finer. It cost about £300.00 to build about 20yrs ago.
    Paul

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chestnut Bob View Post
    Here's my build blog for what it's worth, most of the material was re-claimed so the main cost was the resin and cloth.

    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...ght=strongback

    Good luck with the new build, I'm on my fourth now.

    Chestnut Bob

    What a cracking build, love the detail on the sides. This is something that im looking to do with my own. Did you make this design up yourself or was this copyed of plans

  5. #5
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    I built a cedar stripper a couple of years ago. A Bear Mountain Prospector. It cost me about £900 plus quid to build. Including bead and cove cutters, fine kerf saw blade, and various other odds and ends, and of course the plans. Having to import 60 inch cloth from Canada, also added a premium to the cost. Everything I used was top quality, including the Epiphanes varnish at £25 for 500ml, I used 3 cans.

    Here is a link to a blog by Bonarmbj, which has a couple of shots of my stripper . http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...light=bonarmbj

    I hope this of some help.

    Dave.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for that dave but can i ask why was it so much. Anywhere i look ive been told between 300-500quid to build one. 900quid seems alot as ive had 500quid in mind.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrxireland View Post
    Thanks for that dave but can i ask why was it so much. Anywhere i look ive been told between 300-500quid to build one. 900quid seems alot as ive had 500quid in mind.
    Hi mrxireland,

    Yes mine did cost more than I anticipated, I was hoping to pay less, but I think to build one for £300-£500 is pushing it..but I guess I will be proved wrong.

    A rough breakdown on my costs are as follows.

    I purchased the plans, and 60 inch cloth from Bear Mountain...60 inch cloth was unavailable in the UK at that time..plans, cloth, freight (they would only send by air) an eye watering £250+. And customs wanted their share. I nearly gave up at that point!! I hadn't factored in $110 for freight,or £20 for customs. Costs cun be cut here by using Gilpatrick's plans and sourcing the cloth in the UK. Bear Mountain plans are excellent though. And their service is good.

    Timber. Cedar, ash, american black walnut.£300+ I purchased more timber than I needed so that I could choose the best matching grain. A saving can be made here.

    Thin Kerf blade, bead and cove cutters,for above,£60.

    West system epoxy,pumps, various fillers, graphite powder, acetone,brushes,squeegees,nitrile gloves,etc. £200+

    And still to come is ply and MDF for strongback and moulds. Plus fastenings, glue etc ££s.

    Fastenings for boat,brass and stainless. Cane for seats, glasspaper...lots..brass strip for stems, varnish, etc. ££s

    I hope this is of some help.

    Dave.

  8. #8
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    hi mrxireland, The plans were from Bear Mountain, a Bob Special design. The design on the sides is traditional North American Indian inspired and was a result of splicing dark and light planks and placing them as shown to give the effect I was looking for.
    Again, good luck with your build.
    Chestnut Bob.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ynot View Post
    Hi mrxireland,

    Yes mine did cost more than I anticipated, I was hoping to pay less, but I think to build one for £300-£500 is pushing it..but I guess I will be proved wrong . . . Dave.
    Holy smoke, Dave. No wonder you Limeys spend half a lifetime on the esthetics. I'd better not tell you haw much my last few canoes cost, or you'll be wanting to emigrate! Just a hint; the (mostly NA) Boat Design Forum has a special thread for boats that cost less than $100 and it has well over 100 posts on it. They don't all have a boat, but there's an impressive number that do.

    Well, having ruined your day . . . I should say I loved the boat. How can you bear to get it wet?
    Terry Haines

    Boats are like rabbits: you can have one or many, but not two - A. Onassis

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Kayaker View Post
    Holy smoke, Dave. No wonder you Limeys spend half a lifetime on the esthetics. I'd better not tell you haw much my last few canoes cost, or you'll be wanting to emigrate! Just a hint; the (mostly NA) Boat Design Forum has a special thread for boats that cost less than $100 and it has well over 100 posts on it. They don't all have a boat, but there's an impressive number that do.

    Well, having ruined your day . . . I should say I loved the boat. How can you bear to get it wet?
    Well Terry you have my attention! I have tried to find the forum you mentioned without success...can you post a link please. To build a canoe for less than a $100 sounds an interesting challenge.

    As for getting my boat wet..I have just repaired the damage to the hull sustained on a very shallow, rocky trip on the Wye from Glasbury a few weeks ago. I'm very pleased that I used graphite below the waterline, I'm sure the damage would have been worse without it. Very impressed just how strong these strippers are.

    I'm not sure that I would want to emigrate to Canada for the cheap material costs..but your access to wonderful canoeing locations..well that is another matter. I did a trip in Algonquin with some friends a few years ago..just awesome..loved it. To have access to such a wilderness is a privilege.

    Dave.

  11. #11

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    Hi! Michael: hereís the link to the $100 boat challenge thread:-
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/pro...oat-12176.html

    Post #43 on page 3 and others by Lewisboats are always worth a look, I have an effort on display at post #94, and my personal favorite is a SOF boat by Petros at posts #98 & 103.

    Ouch, you injured your boat! Please note one doesnít damage boats that look that good! My boats donít get badly knocked about as the local lake is calm and almost rock-free; I carry them over the beach and they are kept in a warm workshop - but the rumour that they get bedtime stories read to them most nights is not true.

    We are lucky in Canada in so many ways, not just the scenery and waterways. In this part of the country (Ontario) most people live within a couple of hours drive of a lake or river and I have a choice of several, large and small less than an hour away. Thatís not the reason I left the UK years ago, but itís a good one! On the other hand, to get a serious change of scenery involves a couple of days hard driving whereas in UK you only have to drive an hour or so!
    Terry Haines

    Boats are like rabbits: you can have one or many, but not two - A. Onassis

  12. #12
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    Can anyone point me in the direction of instructions to build a Ribbed Cedar strip canoe I am thinking of 50mm wide strips as I have just seen one rather than the 18mm - 25mm that there seems to be an abundance of.

    I built a Peterborough 16' a few years ago and blogged it here, now looking for a new project
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  13. #13

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    Slowhand, that was something I was interested in, too, but I couldn’t find anything, so I looked at the history of canoe development for ideas.

    Classic canoes have fairly thick, narrow, hardwood ribs closely spaced in order to retain the thousand or more canoe tacks holding the boat together. I reasoned that with the use of glue between ribs and planks, I could use softwood ribs, and since glue would hold the seams together I could also increase rib spacing.

    My current, much delayed build has 10 mm square laminated ribs on 175 mm centers. The ply bottom and the ribs were assembled before the planks were added. This was an experiment that allow me to dispense with the usual building mold, saving material and hopefully time. The thick ribs were stiff, maintaining hull shape during planking.

    It is interesting to note that birch bark canoes were built with relatively wide, thin ribs, primarily I think for ease in bending; they were bent to fit inside the birch bark skin after it was formed into the hull shape, using an external mold of sticks stuck into the ground to define the shape. I am considering thinner, wider ribs for a future build, or possibly replacing the ribs with a thin inner layer of cedar laid with the grain athwartships. This is known as double cedar construction, invented by Dan Herald in 1871.

    The usual method is first to construct a somewhat complex mold that holds the ribs in place while the planking is added. In the case of the double cedar construction the mold must provide a fully skinned surface to support the first layer of planking laid across the hull while the outer planks are laid longitudinally.

    I don't want to invest a lot of time time and material in a building mold, so I am considering using the cylinder molding technique to assemble the hull with the outer planks (longitudinal grain) first, then add either ribs or an inner layer. I would probably use a 1 mm thick inner layer for the double cedar construction.

    As far as the hull lines are concerned, I would expect that you can adapt any strip-built design to ribbed construction. The missing information is the dimensions of the ribs. I aimed at getting the same strength thwartwise as I would have in a ply boat when calculating rib size and spacing. Assuming I am correct, which is admittedly a big assumption, 50 mm x 1.5 mm ribs could be used on 150 mm centers. If I went with the wide ribs that is more or less what I would use. They should bend easily without steaming even if they were of cedar. You could probably double the thickness if you wanted a safety factor without too much difficulty, using a less brittle wood such as pine or even spruce.

    Hopefully the above thoughts will suggest an approach to you. Good luck with your search!
    Terry Haines

    Boats are like rabbits: you can have one or many, but not two - A. Onassis

  14. #14

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    Pic of current partly-finished stripper with ribs. The ribs are radial to the curved edge of the bottom instead of running across the width, which is why they are half-ribs.

    Terry Haines

    Boats are like rabbits: you can have one or many, but not two - A. Onassis

  15. #15

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    For those who are interested I am testing a modified version of the cylindrical molding method with a scale model of a strip-built canoe. There is a thread in the boat forum, this link will take you to the start of build.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boa...tml#post500642
    Terry Haines

    Boats are like rabbits: you can have one or many, but not two - A. Onassis

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