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Thread: Gatz Canoki 13RX

  1. #1

    Default Gatz Canoki 13RX

    Gatz Canoki 13RX - just to get it started
    Last edited by KeithD; 5th-October-2011 at 11:43 AM.
    Keith

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    Is that the whole review?

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    Let's at least have some details. This is from the WWC (importer) website...



    Length: 400 cm / 13' 2"
    Width: 92 cm / 36.2"
    Side height: 36 cm / 14.2"
    Bow height: 50 cm / 19.7"
    Weight: 24.5 kg / 54 Lbs

    Freeboard with
    160 kgs - 24cm
    240 kgs - 20cm
    300 kgs - 17cm

    Interpreting the figures, with 160kg (> 350lbs) on board... the Canoki is at the 12cm waterline: 12cm is just over 4.7"... so that's close to the 5" limit that's recommended for most tandems (and beyond the 4" maximum waterline recommended for most solos). The 240kg and 300kg figures are meaningless (as the Canoki would be overladen).

    The length of 4m (13'2") is probably overall, and looking at the layout at the stems, the waterline length may not even be 3.7m (12')... which is spectacularly short for tandem paddling. The length would be comparable to small solo pack canoes like the Placid Boatworks Spitfire...

    The beam of 92 cm (36.2") is perhaps also a maximum overall figure... but the photos suggest minimal tumblehome and a pretty substantial waterline beam (especially as the hull is so short that the 4" waterline is likely to be more meaningful than the 3" waterline) - in short, the beam of the Canoki would more usually be associated with a much larger tandem.

    At first glance, the closest equivalent that comes to mind is the Mad River Angler. This is Mad River's description of that boat:

    The Angler 14 is not so much a “here to there” canoe as it is a canoe to make the most of where your might be. Steady, reassuring, reliable yet light, it is particularly well-suited to sportsmen, but also makes a great “cottage” boat or summer camp canoe.
    Basically a floating platform: short, wide and slow... but stable and to some eyes, I'm sure, very attractive
    Last edited by GregandGinaS; 5th-October-2011 at 08:47 AM.

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    Default First impressions of Gatz Canoki 13RX

    Although we have paddled hire boats in the intervening period, several years have elapsed since I smashed the last family boat to pieces coming down the Hackfall on the River Ure, so this spring Sally and I decided to bid for a nice yellow Apache 16 with iroku gunnels on eb*y. I soon discovered I hadn’t done my research properly and although I enjoyed the Apache as a solo boat it was wholly unsuitable for family day tripping. My bow paddler is wary of all water, boats in general and canoes in particular and the Apache 16 has the stability of an unmedicated schizophrenic. So bearing in mind that the two primary considerations in our choice of canoe were stability and light weight, the Apache and Family ‘nigelphoto’ soon parted company. That was replaced with an Apache Tribe which was a whole lot more stable, but weighed 90 lbs and Benenden Health wouldn't cover the hernia op so that had to go within a few weeks. Luckily Apaches are popular and sell very well so I didn't loose out on either deal.


    I had seen the Gatz Canoki 13RX in Brookbank Carlisle earlier in the summer and was torn between this and the Nova PAL 16. Having put a thread up here asking for opinions on which boat to go for, consensus definitely favoured the PAL but I am a contrary ole codger and don't always do what I'm told. At the Big Meeting at Ullswater in September I took the opportunity to try several boats and within a few minutes in the Canoki I knew it was the one for me. I want a canoe for short river and lake trips with wife, picnic and sometimes small grand children as well as the occasional solo paddle when I have to car top it on my own. The Gatz Canoki 13RX does both very well; the full hull shape is inherently stable and engenders a feeling of safety, and weighing just 54lbs is 10% lighter than the PAL making it easy to portage and car top. I haven’t tried it yet but it seems to me that this boat would lend itself well to standing and poling.


    At an overall length of 13’3” the Canoki is short and rather wide, 36”, and has little rocker. Surprisingly it tracks fairly straight and is not as slow through the water as one might think despite the lack of length. The shape is pleasing to the eye with a certain amount of sheer; the sharp entry, flare behind the bow/stern and the slight upturn at the ends make it a reasonably dry boat in a chop. I bought the green ‘holz rand’ (wood trim) model that Brookbank had in stock, which I happen to prefer since I find it easy to outfit as one can drill holes and the ash gunnels looks so nice, although there is more maintenance involved applying tung oil every 3 months or so. There is no tumblehome, the centre section bottom is quite flat but the hull has volume and with good depth at 14” the Canoki will take a fair load without compromising freeboard, although space is a limiting factor. It would certainly be less than ideal for a tandem camping trip, but as my missus prefers overnight trips to be a gentle 10 miles between B&B’s or pubs with rooms, then that’s not a problem for us. The Canoki edges well and it’ll spin round on a sixpence. It is quite important to add weight up front when solo, as there is insufficient room to paddle from the bow seat facing the stern - in this position the yoke would be directly under one’s chin! I fill a 5 gal water container placed for’ard of the bow seat which trims the canoe just fine for my 13st 8 weight.


    The Royalex construction seems to be stiffer than some other canoe designs and there is not even a hint of oilcanning. On the German website Gatz claim that it is especially tough in encounters with rocks - as Google Translate quaintly puts it “Even with brutal contact with rocks keep your canoe Gatz are generally largely unbeschädigt”. So after a month’s use on a variety of rivers, some landings on sand, some scrapes over rocky riverbeds, my Canoki remains ‘unbeshagged’! What scratches there are can be taken out with car polish as long as they haven’t penetrated the foam core - it is, after all, the same material from which car bumpers are made. I have added a small measure of protection by putting short lengths of duct tape under bow and stern which absorbs any impact on getting in and out from gravel or sandy launch sites.


    I haven’t had the opportunity to do any WW as yet and with the BCU’s agreement with local riparian owners and fishing clubs that Northumberland’s rivers are verboten to canoeists during September and October it looks like I’ll have to wait until November if I want to avoid hassle with ghillies and the fisherfolk. Did someone start a thread on naming canoes? Well the Canoki is made in Cologne so the name (see images) was obvious - although so far I haven’t tried it at periscope depth!


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nigelphoto2011/sets/72157627565743411/

    ‘Thought comes before speech’ Ota Kte (Chief Luther Standing Bear of the Lakota Sioux)
    Last edited by nigelphoto; 5th-October-2011 at 09:42 AM.
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

  5. #5

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    I guess it depends on what you're used to, and what you use it for. I'm sure it's pretty stable with that very wide beam, but from my point of view it's too heavy, too slow, and with WAY too small load-capacity. I really wouldn't want to paddle it very far, or carry it either. By way of comparison, my fibreglass 14' comes in at 20.5 kg, and my carb/kevlar 14' at 17.5 kg. and both have a much faster profile.

    Just my 2-cents worth.

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    Default Read the review . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by sk8r View Post
    I guess it depends on what you're used to, and what you use it for. I'm sure it's pretty stable with that very wide beam, but from my point of view it's too heavy, too slow, and with WAY too small load-capacity. I really wouldn't want to paddle it very far, or carry it either. By way of comparison, my fibreglass 14' comes in at 20.5 kg, and my carb/kevlar 14' at 17.5 kg. and both have a much faster profile.

    Just my 2-cents worth.
    Exactly - I don't want to paddle it far, I don't want to carry a heavy load and at 24kg it's just 3.5kg heavier than your 14' boat . . . ie the weight of a lunch box. It suits my particular needs and the reason I put the review up is that some others may have similar requirements in a boat. Its like saying to a family man 'why did you buy a Ford Fiesta when you could have had a Maserati Quatroporto?' !!
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelphoto View Post
    .......you could have had a Maserati Quatroporto?' !!
    I dunno what that is, but I think I want one!

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    love Gaze lets start a fan club lol


    mick

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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8r View Post
    I dunno what that is, but I think I want one!

    You might have a problem getting your canoe on the roof, but if you manage it you'll get to your put in point quite fast !!
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    Smile Just for you

    Quote Originally Posted by sk8r View Post
    I dunno what that is, but I think I want one!
    Well here's a nice snap of one - just for you!

    Last edited by KeithD; 14th-October-2011 at 06:34 PM. Reason: helping with photo
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    L O L gatz

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    Hello all,

    After lurking for far too long, this seems like an excellent moment to make my first real posting (my first post was an hasty attemp to make a bid for a canoe that is slightly different from a Canoki).
    How nice to have met a fellow Canoki paddler and a lot more people with an opinion on this lovely rubenesque craft.

    I am absolutely biased when it comes to the Canoki since this is my first paddling love.
    I have owned a royalex with wood trim just like Nigel's (congrats :-) for about ten years now.

    With my budget and the lack of good secod hand canoes at the time (in the Netherlands) was between a plastic Mad River Teton, a Grumman and this once used wood-trim royalex Canoki.
    Perhaps it were the luscious hips that won me over.

    I've had loads of fun in the Canoki must say the Canoki, doing many different things.
    It has taken me almost everywhere: canals, lakes, streams and even surfing at sea.
    For an impression, see some pics here

    I must admit that my 18ft Jensen KU does seem somewhat faster (-; but I've mostly been able to keep up with my fellow paddlers paddling longer boats, also on longer trips.
    I've paddled it solo a lot as well, but then you'll want to sit near to the yoke and lean it because of the width, which it does really nicely.

    The Canoki got me tripping as well (most notably beautiful Rogen in Sweden), but then you'll have to leave the kitchen sink at home, or go on a diet to keep adequate freeboard.
    Class 3 white water with two inexperienced paddlers was somewhat of a tall order, but I don't want to blame that on the poor boat (after we left ship, Canoki showed it's playing potential by doing a rather nice loop)

    The last few years my flock of canoes has seen a remarkable growth, and with the arrival of different boats for specific purposes (Perception Slasher/converted ForPLay, Wenonah Solitude and Jensen 18) the trusty Canoki didn't get the attention it deserves. I'm emotionally preparing myself to sell it in the near future, but before that I want to do some tandem whitewater with the pedestals I have around and particullary some sailing with a rig fron an "optimist" sailing boat.

    Last weekend I took the Canoki for the first time in a while for attending a workshop by Becky Mason.
    I had great fun to paddling it again, leaned to the gunwhale en feel it respond and turn smoothly.

    Best regards,
    Martijn.

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    Yo - Canoki surfing - way to go, Martijn!
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelphoto View Post
    Although we have paddled hire boats in the intervening period, several years have elapsed since I smashed the last family boat to pieces coming down the Hackfall on the River Ure, so this spring Sally and I decided to bid for a nice yellow Apache 16 with iroku gunnels on eb*y. I soon discovered I hadn’t done my research properly and although I enjoyed the Apache as a solo boat it was wholly unsuitable for family day tripping. My bow paddler is wary of all water, boats in general and canoes in particular and the Apache 16 has the stability of an unmedicated schizophrenic. So bearing in mind that the two primary considerations in our choice of canoe were stability and light weight, the Apache and Family ‘nigelphoto’ soon parted company. That was replaced with an Apache Tribe which was a whole lot more stable, but weighed 90 lbs and Benenden Health wouldn't cover the hernia op so that had to go within a few weeks. Luckily Apaches are popular and sell very well so I didn't loose out on either deal.


    I had seen the Gatz Canoki 13RX in Brookbank Carlisle earlier in the summer and was torn between this and the Nova PAL 16. Having put a thread up here asking for opinions on which boat to go for, consensus definitely favoured the PAL but I am a contrary ole codger and don't always do what I'm told. At the Big Meeting at Ullswater in September I took the opportunity to try several boats and within a few minutes in the Canoki I knew it was the one for me. I want a canoe for short river and lake trips with wife, picnic and sometimes small grand children as well as the occasional solo paddle when I have to car top it on my own. The Gatz Canoki 13RX does both very well; the full hull shape is inherently stable and engenders a feeling of safety, and weighing just 54lbs is 10% lighter than the PAL making it easy to portage and car top. I haven’t tried it yet but it seems to me that this boat would lend itself well to standing and poling.


    At an overall length of 13’3” the Canoki is short and rather wide, 36”, and has little rocker. Surprisingly it tracks fairly straight and is not as slow through the water as one might think despite the lack of length. The shape is pleasing to the eye with a certain amount of sheer; the sharp entry, flare behind the bow/stern and the slight upturn at the ends make it a reasonably dry boat in a chop. I bought the green ‘holz rand’ (wood trim) model that Brookbank had in stock, which I happen to prefer since I find it easy to outfit as one can drill holes and the ash gunnels looks so nice, although there is more maintenance involved applying tung oil every 3 months or so. There is no tumblehome, the centre section bottom is quite flat but the hull has volume and with good depth at 14” the Canoki will take a fair load without compromising freeboard, although space is a limiting factor. It would certainly be less than ideal for a tandem camping trip, but as my missus prefers overnight trips to be a gentle 10 miles between B&B’s or pubs with rooms, then that’s not a problem for us. The Canoki edges well and it’ll spin round on a sixpence. It is quite important to add weight up front when solo, as there is insufficient room to paddle from the bow seat facing the stern - in this position the yoke would be directly under one’s chin! I fill a 5 gal water container placed for’ard of the bow seat which trims the canoe just fine for my 13st 8 weight.


    The Royalex construction seems to be stiffer than some other canoe designs and there is not even a hint of oilcanning. On the German website Gatz claim that it is especially tough in encounters with rocks - as Google Translate quaintly puts it “Even with brutal contact with rocks keep your canoe Gatz are generally largely unbeschädigt”. So after a month’s use on a variety of rivers, some landings on sand, some scrapes over rocky riverbeds, my Canoki remains ‘unbeshagged’! What scratches there are can be taken out with car polish as long as they haven’t penetrated the foam core - it is, after all, the same material from which car bumpers are made. I have added a small measure of protection by putting short lengths of duct tape under bow and stern which absorbs any impact on getting in and out from gravel or sandy launch sites.


    I haven’t had the opportunity to do any WW as yet and with the BCU’s agreement with local riparian owners and fishing clubs that Northumberland’s rivers are verboten to canoeists during September and October it looks like I’ll have to wait until November if I want to avoid hassle with ghillies and the fisherfolk. Did someone start a thread on naming canoes? Well the Canoki is made in Cologne so the name (see images) was obvious - although so far I haven’t tried it at periscope depth!


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nigelphoto2011/sets/72157627565743411/

    ‘Thought comes before speech’ Ota Kte (Chief Luther Standing Bear of the Lakota Sioux)

    IMGP0240 by nigelphoto2011, on Flickr



    IMGP0243 by nigelphoto2011, on Flickr


    IMGP0276 by nigelphoto2011, on Flickr


    IMGP0245 by nigelphoto2011, on Flickr


    IMGP0265 by nigelphoto2011, on Flickr

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    Default Thanks Gordon . . . .again!

    I did do what you said and removed the 'permissions' restrictions but I still can't put my pictures into a thread, whatever I try. I think its a 1 star CLAIT course I need, not BCU!!
    Last edited by nigelphoto; 15th-October-2011 at 01:32 PM. Reason: Spelling, sa uasul
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelphoto View Post
    I did do what you said and removed the 'permissions' restrictions but I still can't put my pictures into a thread, whatever I try. I think its a 1 star CLAIT course I need, not BCU!!
    It's easier now you'e removed the restrictions. All you need to do is, go into Flickr, bring up the picture you want, click on 'Share', then click on BBCode. Then copy the text in the box and paste it into your post here. And Bob's your uncle.

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    Nigelphoto

    I now feel the need for an Apache 16 just from your stability description

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks View Post
    Nigelphoto

    I now feel the need for an Apache 16 just from your stability description

    Paul
    The Apache is a great boat, just not for persuading my better-half to paddle with me!
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

  19. #19

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    Hi martin,i apologise if i disturb you,during a tread on this forum i asked advices about canoki behaviour on the sea and Nigelphoto say me to contact you.
    Could you tell me anything?
    Nigel shoe me your phtos too,fantastic!Waves are really high...

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    Hello Samuel,

    No worries, Lennart already told me that there was another possible Canokist active here (-:
    I used the Canoki a few times on calm seas, no problem and only one time in a real waves, as shown on the photo's.
    It is stable and predictable.
    It did really well surfing in the waves as well, only thing is that for reasons of stability and control I find kneeling to work much better than sitting legs forward, but that's my experience in any boat.
    When your being "tumble dried" rolling arround in the waves, however kneeling on a canoe seat makes exiting your boat rather nasty for your legs.
    That's why I have bought the Gatz saddle seats, but i must still finish installing them...

    However fond I am of the Canoki, I understand that you mainly want it to use paddling solo.
    Here the width comes into play. Sitting in the middle for solo paddling your paddle is rather far aside.
    On flatwater (when there's not to much wind) you can counter this because it really leans wonderfully (see one of the pictures on the picasalink above) and is capable of reaching an acceptable speed if you do your best as well (no point in trying to keep with a Wenonah Advantage tough..).

    Leaning is not the first thing I would think of at sea and in strong winds. It also makes cross strokes and switching paddling sides much harder.
    If you are ever around in the The Hague Area (half an hour from Hoek van Holland where the ferry from Dover lands), you are welcome to take the Canoki for a spin at sea or elsewhere.
    As noted above I am mentally preparing myself to sell it next year, wanna take it to sea a few times more, though. It is in Royalex however.

    So if solo paddling at sea is your main goal, I would suggest something narrower, and perhaps (I understand that in some regions this might be regarded as a strange notion ;-)) a proper solo boat.
    I just bought a Mohawk Solo 13, which I think would be very nice considering your intended use (very light, solo, stable), except for the wooden gunnels.
    But you save a lot of money to spend on other nice wooden things.

    Please let me know if you wanna know anything else.

    Best regards,
    Martijn.
    Last edited by Martijn; 24th-November-2011 at 09:57 PM. Reason: Spelling..

  21. #21

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    Hi,Martin,thank you very much,and what do you think about yaqui (gatz-kanus)?

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    Hello Samuel,

    You're welcome. I haven't paddled a Yaqui, so it's hard for me to tell.
    A quick look at the german Gatz-webskite (below) gives me the impression that between the Canoki and the Yaqui, the latter as a proper solo boat would be prefferable to a Canoki when it comes to solo paddling at sea (or elsewhere for that matter..).
    The spraydeck, for which the hull is already prepared, might be a nice option at sea, but it might be good to ask some advice from users about the possibility to exit your boat in rough conditions and getting water out of the bouw after a capsize. And try before you buy, also with possible sitting options and positions.

    One other thing is the specific upper deck shape of the Yaqui (and Yoho's)
    It looks like it could give you a dry ride, especially with the spraydeck, but you might want to test the effect that winds have on the raised edges.

    Also using the gunnel as leverage point on the end of your stroke works differently. I have only once paddled a Yoho, but my paddling mate cut open his hand from the spraydeckrail on the side. So if you like to paddle close to the hull, this is also something you might wanna test out.

    In short: try to paddle as much boats as you can, especially solo's and perhaps anyone else here has got experience with the "decked" Gatz canoes or perhaps other solo's that work well at sea.

    Anyways, what in what kind of seas will you be paddling, calm, big waves..?

    http://www.secure.kanu-gatz.de/index...EINER-CANADIER
    Last edited by Martijn; 26th-November-2011 at 04:10 PM.

  23. #23

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    Well, i dislike sea when it's too rough,i don't swim too;if waves are 1 metre or more i dislike to swim too

  24. #24

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    Hi Nigel,I'm Samuel again,do you remember?I'm going to order from gatz at least,and so i'd like to ask you a last information about weigt you must add to canoki,using it as a soloid you fill it weightless?Could you tell me if it rise from the water?Many thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    Hi Nigel,I'm Samuel again,do you remember?I'm going to order from gatz at least,and so i'd like to ask you a last information about weigt you must add to canoki,using it as a soloid you fill it weightless?Could you tell me if it rise from the water?Many thanks
    Hi Samuel
    I weigh 85kg and I fill a 25 litre water container which is available in the UK on Amazon at £5 + postage and place it forward of the bow seat in the Canoki. I always paddle from the stern seat as there is not enough room to paddle from the bow seat with the canoe travelling 'backwards' in the conventional manner. I mostly sit as my knees are old and tired and my legs get sore quickly, unless I am going through a bit of Grd 1/2 and I kneel on a Gatz Knieplatte hintern http://www.secure.kanu-gatz.de/index.php?id=36&lang=e . The only other thing I would advise is that if you can afford the extra money it is well worth getting the Holz Rand (wooden gunnel) model as it is easier to outfit with airbags and it does look a lot nicer. I am including a picture in which you can see the water container in the bow - best of luck and let me know when you have got your canoe!!

    Alnwood
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

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    I paddled one of these at the Big Meet too, and it was SO much nicer than I expected, though the windy conditions were hardly perfect testing weather. I assumed it would be a tub, but it went surprisingly quickly, turned well and was definitely fun, even though the laws of physics and hydrodynamics say it probably shouldn't be.

    In fact, I was pleasantly surprised with all 3 of the Gatz I paddled. The Racoon was hilarious fun.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

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  27. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelphoto View Post
    Hi Samuel
    I weigh 85kg and I fill a 25 litre water container which is available in the UK on Amazon at £5 + postage and place it forward of the bow seat in the Canoki. I always paddle from the stern seat as there is not enough room to paddle from the bow seat with the canoe travelling 'backwards' in the conventional manner. I mostly sit as my knees are old and tired and my legs get sore quickly, unless I am going through a bit of Grd 1/2 and I kneel on a Gatz Knieplatte hintern http://www.secure.kanu-gatz.de/index.php?id=36&lang=e . The only other thing I would advise is that if you can afford the extra money it is well worth getting the Holz Rand (wooden gunnel) model as it is easier to outfit with airbags and it does look a lot nicer. I am including a picture in which you can see the water container in the bow - best of luck and let me know when you have got your canoe!!

    Alnwood
    Thank you very much Nigel;some days ago i illustrated the problem to Gatz and they answer me saying there're 60 cm between yoke and bow seat;what do you think?I'm 178cm tall and i weigh 93 kg...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    Thank you very much Nigel;some days ago i illustrated the problem to Gatz and they answer me saying there're 60 cm between yoke and bow seat;what do you think?I'm 178cm tall and i weigh 93 kg...
    Hi Samuel, I think something has got lost in translation between you and the Germans because the actual measurement on the Canoki from the yoke to the bow seat is 37 cm, and the distance from the yoke to the stern seat is 75 cm. It just is not possible for anyone, not even a child or a Springer Spaniel to sit in the bowseat and paddle the canoe backwards. Anything else you need to know then don't hesitate to post up on here.
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

  29. #29

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    Thank you very much Nigel!!!Paddle backwards means sitting on bow seat facing the stern,really?

  30. #30

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    Another thing,the model would be canoki 400 wood gunnel....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    Thank you very much Nigel!!!Paddle backwards means sitting on bow seat facing the stern,really?
    Anything a little longer like a PAL, Prospector or anything over 14' when paddling solo it is usual to sit in the bow seat but the 'wrong way round' so the canoe is going in the direction opposite to that which you would normally paddle when with 2 people. In a bigger canoe the balance would be just about right without having to put in any weight to counterbalance it. In the Canoki because it is so short if you were to sit this way, it would be extremely dangerous as your knees would get trapped under the yoke and your feet under the seat if you tipped over. Glad you have ordered the 400 Holz Rand - what colour?
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

  32. #32

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    Works fine on a symmetrical hull.

  33. #33

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    I don't order yet(luckly!).If this is so,i think i will just order yaqui.I'm not going to take to the sea a water container at all,expecially while i'm taking canoe on my shoulders and paddle,in the paddle bag,shoulder belt!And i'm not going to fill and empty the container each time!For a bit of stability more it's useless,are you agree!Yaqui is quite stable as canoki.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Stone, Staffordshire
    Posts
    381

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    I don't order yet(luckly!).If this is so,i think i will just order yaqui.I'm not going to take to the sea a water container at all,expecially while i'm taking canoe on my shoulders and paddle,in the paddle bag,shoulder belt!And i'm not going to fill and empty the container each time!For a bit of stability more it's useless,are you agree!Yaqui is quite stable as canoki.
    You don't need to fill the water container until you reach the water, and then empty it when you get out - that way you are not carrying any more than 1kg for the plastic container and you can secure it to the bow seat with a buggy cord when you are portaging the canoe. I don't think the Yacqui will be suitable at all for paddling in the sea with that bow shape - I think it would be far too wet - but that is only my opinion as I have not paddled one but only have observed one being paddled.
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

  35. #35

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    Excuse me,"it'd be far to wet" cause the bow shape or height?Cause it's a bit less high than canoki...It's just that shape that go in water?!Please,explain me this,please

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Stone, Staffordshire
    Posts
    381

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    Excuse me,"it'd be far to wet" cause the bow shape or height?Cause it's a bit less high than canoki...It's just that shape that go in water?!Please,explain me this,please
    With a canvas deck cover any boat is a drier than without but without a back-to-back trial in the same conditions it would be difficult to predict the different ways in which the Yaqui and Canoki would react. I have no experience of the Yaqui apart from watching someone else paddling it, but I would think that in sea conditions the long nose bow could dig in at the base of a wave whereas the Canoki bow rises up and over which I know from experience. Is there a Gatz dealer close by where you live so you can try the two types? We have the advantage in the North of England of a dealer (Brookbank) who puts on demonstration days where we can try many different types of boats, which is why I ended up buying my Canoki.
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

  37. #37

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    Hi Martin,about something narrower,what do you think of argosy(wenonah) and yaqui(gatz)?Many thanks

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Stone, Staffordshire
    Posts
    381

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    Gatz Canoki sea paddling









    'If you think I'm getting in that, then you're gonna have to catch me first'!
    'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis

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