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Thread: Rafting restrictions law proposed by fishermen rejected

  1. #1
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    Default Rafting restrictions law proposed by fishermen rejected

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...ntral-14063236


    Rafting row over River Tay salmon fishing

    Fisherman want to restrict commercial rafting on the River Tay
    Continue reading the main story Related Stories



    Salmon fisherman in Perthshire have said that "relentless" commercial rafting is destroying once lucrative fishing beats.
    Rafting companies using the Upper Tay are making the river a "highway", many fisherman claim.
    But one operator said they restricted rafting days and were sensitive to the presence of fisherman.
    A by-law proposal to restrict rafting in the area has recently been rejected by Perth and Kinross councillors.
    The sport has become increasingly popular since the 2003 Land Reform Act opened up access.
    Les Dargie, who said he had fished the six-mile stretch between Aberfeldy and Grandtully for a number of years, said many fisherman were now going elsewhere.
    'Staying away' He told BBC Scotland: "There's no question at all that the fishing is affected adversely by this relentless commercial pressure on the resource.
    Continue reading the main story “Start Quote

    If we see a fisherman all the messing about stops”
    End Quote Steve Thomas Raft river guide
    "If you come to fish you'll find that quite often if a lot of rafts have been through you won't catch fish.
    "The result is that people tend to say away - people like me who could be paying into the local economy."
    There are five rafting companies currently operating on the Upper Tay, catering for families and school trips as well as hen and stag parties.
    Freespirits owner and river guide Steve Thomas, who has worked on the Tay for 20 years, said he sympathised with the fisherman, but did not accept that the boats were a nuisance.
    "We do play about on the river, people do like to jump in the river," he said.
    "[But] we don't do it in sensitive areas and we don't do it in fishing pools. If we see a fisherman all the messing about stops... That's what should be happening."
    Mr Thomas said his company restricted rafting on Tuesdays, Thursdays and often on Saturdays.
    'Equally important' But he added: "Effectively what's happened in the last two years, the fisherman are asking us to stay off the river for three consecutive days - Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday - and it's just something that we can't work with."
    Last month, Fish Legal - a body operating on behalf of the Salmon Fisheries Board - asked Perth and Kinross Council to introduce a by-law that would set aside three consecutive days for fishing.
    The request was turned down on the grounds it was unenforceable, but the council's community safety convener Willie Robertson rejected suggestions that the council had failed to take into account fisherman's interests.
    "Both are equally important to the area," he said.
    "If we can do anything to help both parties I hope we can do that."

  2. #2
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    people like me who could be paying into the local economy
    Because of course all those people on the rafts aren't paying anything into the local economy

  3. #3
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    If you're concerned about bothering the fish, stop pulling them out of the river!!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhofmann View Post
    If you're concerned about bothering the fish, stop pulling them out of the river!!
    This is a great reply. Very funny but very true.

    Alan

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by bhofmann View Post
    If you're concerned about bothering the fish, stop pulling them out of the river!!
    Well said!

    I've often wondered about that, in the context of Brit fisher-folk, coz it seems they don't catch 'em to eat 'em (which I don't oppose - I catch 'em when I'm hungry out there...). Seems they just sort-of yank 'em around a little, tear up a little cartilege and flesh, and then throw 'em back in....I don't get that, at all......

  6. #6
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    Totally agree Sk8r.

    I don't understand unless you are going to eat them. Same goes for any animal.

    Alan

  7. #7
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    An amiable past-time - tormenting living creatures with hooks in their mouths. Hmmmmm
    PWC
    ___________________________________
    Know less, carry more - you're in a canoe !

  8. #8
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    Well it looks as if this one is going to court,

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...ntral-15624623
    Cheers
    Mark

    "When I wanted to know something, I wanted it undistorted by somebody else's imperfect knowledge" Milton Erickson

  9. #9
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    Er.....

    Does that mean that the rafters get three consecutive fishing free days too?

  10. #10
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    Rafting doesn't seem to be having too much of an effect according to this report http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/...al/7409963.stm

    ps Just spotted this is a report from 2008, but rafting was going on then. It's more likely that the 10% of fish that are not returned after capture along with the returned ones that are too stressed to survive has a more detrimental effect on fry numbers/returning large fish than rafting (a female fish lays approx 7000 eggs a dead one lays nothing). After all one of the duties of a riparian owner is to not put in place anything that could interfere with the passage of migratory fish. Surely placing an angler in the water is doing just that.
    Paul
    Last edited by paulsmith; 7th-November-2011 at 08:27 PM.
    Just goin with the flow

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanger_on View Post
    Well it looks as if this one is going to court,

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...ntral-15624623
    An ambiguous quote from the article "Landowners on the Upper Tay who believe "relentless" commercial rafting is destroying lucrative fishing grounds are to take legal action over access."

    Are they claiming that the rafting is destroying their income or the fishing grounds?

    It seems it's more of the former and very little of the latter judging by a later quote "whilst the rafting businesses expand and improve in their profitability, the fishing interests are on their knees."

    So there will be more fish surviving to breed thanks to the rafting activity.

  12. #12
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    It can't be denied that rafting is destroying the peace and quiet of the river - detrimental to enjoyment by a quiet canoeing party and by many other river users.

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