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Thread: Snowghillie have u a Cormorant recipe?

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    Default Snowghillie have u a Cormorant recipe?

    Snowghillie did Mad alf the Norweeegie canoeist black powederist kill anything that you can eatist ever give you the cormorant recipe?

    Those guys who have a license to shoot them just dump the birds and I fancy a bbq to try it.

    By the way your mink recipe was good.

    Woodsmoke
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    Default Cormorants a TV recipe

    I will not take the bait as my last mink thing upset people. But I will say this, can you imagine David Beckham being done for poaching? No! he is too clean living. Well it happened in Norway to their most decorated nordic racer Bjorn Dale. At a sort of celeb dinner party filmed at his hunting setter he served cormorant and grouse both shot out of season.
    I was shocked to find out there was a season for cormorant. I saw the programm and it involved the bird being wrapped in bacon. I know you have to skin it well to get the fat off as this is the fishy tasting bit. Some say you soak it in milk others say wine but this would be a waste of wine in Norway.

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    We call cormorant's "SCARTS", just can't imagine anybody cooking or eating them here on the West Coast

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowghillie View Post
    I will not take the bait as my last mink thing upset people. But I will say this, can you imagine David Beckham being done for poaching? No! he is too clean living. Well it happened in Norway to their most decorated nordic racer Bjorn Dale. At a sort of celeb dinner party filmed at his hunting setter he served cormorant and grouse both shot out of season.
    I was shocked to find out there was a season for cormorant. I saw the programm and it involved the bird being wrapped in bacon. I know you have to skin it well to get the fat off as this is the fishy tasting bit. Some say you soak it in milk others say wine but this would be a waste of wine in Norway.
    On the contrary, although I object to the inhumane killing of anything I'm not against them being eaten when humane culling is necessary. In fact when I'm made ruler of the universe it will become compulsory - especially if they taste particularly vile
    Happy paddling,
    Rob.

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    Don't forget that the Cormorant is protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, and the EU birds directive.

    A licence to shoot Cormorants is available, but the application needs to demonstrate that there is a serious risk of damage to fisheries stock, and that there is no other satisfactory, non-lethal alternative to their 'managment'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwing View Post
    In fact when I'm made ruler of the universe it will become compulsory - especially if they taste particularly vile
    When I am made supreme ruler of the universe there will be a cull of about 4.5 billion humans (or maybe I will send them to one of those new planets they found) and humans must taste particularly vile from all the smoking drinking and fast food.


    Cormorant would be quite greasy... the best way to cook birds like that is to cut the meat up into cubes, wrap it with bacon and deep fry it, then dip it in your favorite sauce (Teriyaki for Canada Goose).
    Lloyd

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    [quote=WhyAyeMan;14981]When I am made supreme ruler of the universe there will be a cull of about 4.5 billion humans (or maybe I will send them to one of those new planets they found) and humans must taste particularly vile from all the smoking drinking and fast food.

    In that case has anyone got any recipies for humans?
    There is nothing—
    absolute nothing—half so much worth
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    Quote Originally Posted by climb_paddle_play View Post
    In that case has anyone got any recipies for humans?
    Ask this guy.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/2569095.stm
    Lloyd

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    Old recipe for cormorant was to bind it between two oak boards, bury it for a week, dig it up, throw away the cormorant, & eat the boards...

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    When I am made supreme ruler of the universe there will be a cull of about 4.5 billion humans (or maybe I will send them to one of those new planets they found) and humans must taste particularly vile from all the smoking drinking and fast food.
    Cormorant would be quite greasy... the best way to cook birds like that is to cut the meat up into cubes, wrap it with bacon and deep fry it, then dip it in your favorite sauce (Teriyaki for Canada Goose).
    Quite greasy but nowhere near greasy enough judging by your recipe Lloyd . I don't think you need to do the cull of all those humans - just getting them to adopt your cooking style would do the trick nicely methinks.
    Happy paddling,
    Rob.

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    You know when I first tried Deep fried Canada Goose wrapped in bacon I thought I may as well just slice a piece off of a block of lard; but once I tried it it wasn't bad. I guess it depends on the oil you use. The guy who was doing the cooking used sunflower oil I believe. It turns out a lot like beef if you can believe that. My UK family used to have deep fried breakfast consisting of bread, eggs, and sausage all done in the cooker. I personally don't have much tolerance for greasy food as it makes me ill. You are right though I probably won't have to cull the herd, they are doing that themselves.
    Lloyd

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    Richard Feynman.

    www.senseaboutscience.org

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    Default Human Recipe

    This is absolutly true Woodsmoke gave me an anthropology book on the study of cannabils. Woodsmoke said that the wise people at his university said that groups of people who do mostly do it for religious reasons but in this book there is one tribe mentioned that did it cause they liked the taste! Most of the tribes in the book have canoe gods and use the canoe in its many forms as their main mode of transport. The moral of this story is do not take your canoeing too seriously or worship the canoe as you do not know where it will lead to. Eating neds, veggie A.L. folk or other rival tribes.

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    You know I really appreciate a group of people that will talk on a forum about canoe cannibals... You just don't find people willing to do that over here.

    I guess if you would eat a cormorant you would eat anything so we are not that far off topic.
    Last edited by MagiKelly; 7th-September-2006 at 09:38 PM.
    Lloyd

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    www.senseaboutscience.org

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    Default Real food and 4* Fungi

    Well I just returned home from a hard days doing nothing at work (according to woodsmoke ) to find my "other consenting adult" as I think you have to call them on such blogs as the P.C. people are watching. Anyway to find the kitchen full of fungi, bolets, chants, sporasis all being prepared for eating and drying. My little east europian soul went into raptures with the smell. My companion animal was not too impressed as he only "likes meeet" as the creature comforts jaguar used to say. So if any of the folk that I am doing the 4* training for this weekend read this you are all invited up to ours for some "vild meet unt fungi"

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    Default cormorant recipe

    Quote Originally Posted by GoneFishing View Post
    Old recipe for cormorant was to bind it between two oak boards, bury it for a week, dig it up, throw away the cormorant, & eat the boards...
    your recipe sounds more gourmet than the one I use

    Take one cormorant
    a big pan
    2 litres water
    lots of nice vegetables

    First throw away the cormorant......

    actually the first time I ate cormorant it was made with dried boletus edulis in the sauce and I put the bad taste down to poor quality mushrooms .....maybe I should have kept the cormorant and chucked the ceps....think I will try your recipe!!

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    Default Cormorant and mushrooms

    Does actually sound good but I know what you mean about dried boletus as sometines if they are a bit over when you dry them they can taste a bit strong. My other consenting adult has a food drier for her organic veg and wild foods. It dries mushrooms very well along with all sorts of veg which makes for handy meals when camping. Well the fungi are out and she has picked lots already cause she is a fantastic at all that wild foods stuff. I take it that you are telling the truth when you say that you have eaten cormorant as you join a rather elite group of gourmets. Cormorant cooked well is fantastic if it was not then it would not feature on national T.V. in Norway.

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    Strange, apparently Sainsburys don't stock cormorant, although one helpful soul thought it may be in the freezer section, near the fish fingers.

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    A fellow from Newfoundland told me about his seagull recipe once. They are protected over here but the Newfies have a cuisine all their own. Seagulls all to frequently eat at garbage dumps so I wouldn't want to try one. I doubt you will be seeing them in your grocers freezer anytime soon either.
    Lloyd

    I never pay attention to anything by "experts". I calculate everything myself.
    Richard Feynman.

    www.senseaboutscience.org

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowghillie View Post
    My other consenting adult .... she is a fantastic at all that wild foods stuff.
    snowghillie you are not kidding there mate! From the banks of the Tay to the West coast she has shared her home baking on reflector ovens, wild mushies on toast along with your road kill (or any other kill ) fry ups!

    Although I must say Snowghillie... you really ought to keep that cannabilism /cormorant fetish of yours quiet! Midgie (my good lady) is a senior psychiatric nurse and she'll have to sort you out!

    But hey I could be convinced if it were neds... as well you know you often flavour your roadkill with beer, wine or whatever and believe it or not buckfast is a tonic wine and I'm sure it would flavour and soften even the toughest one!
    Expand your mind there's plenty space for it...

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    Default Newfies

    By good old pal Boyd is a Newfey. We paddled together lots until he moved out of the area. Newfies are different and I have fond memories his recitations of Service poems round the fire. His child loved the "Cremation of Sam McGee" as a bedtime story aged four. Inspired by him I learned it and often recite it in snowholes when people are complaining about the cold. "talk of the cold through the parkas fold it stabbed like a driven nail" "if our eyes we'ed close then our lashes froze until sometimes we could not see" "it was not much fun but the only one to whimper was a none Newfey".

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    I must give you the classic recipe for the preparation & cooking of a cormorant. Having shot your cormorant, hold it well away from you as you carry it home; these birds are exceedingly verminous & lice are said to be not entirely host-specific. Hang up by the feet with a piece of wire, soak in petrol & set on fire. This treatment both removes most of the feathers and kills the lice. When the smoke has cleared away, take the cormorant down & cut off its beak…. bury the carcass preferablely in light sandy soil & leave it there for a fortnight. This is said to improve the flavour by, in part at least, removing the taste of rotting fish. Dig up & skin the bird. Place in a strong salt & water solution & soak for 48 hours. Remove, dry, stuff with whole unpeeled onions: the onion skins are supposed to bleach the meat to a small extent so that it is very dark brown as opposed to entirely black.
    Simmer gently in seawater, to which two tablespoons of chloride of lime has been added, for a further 6 hours. This has a further tenderising effect. Take out of the water & allow to dry, meanwhile mixing up a stiff paste of methylated spirit & curry powder. Spread this mixture liberally over the breast of the bird. Finally, roast in a very hot oven for 3 hours. The result is unbelievable. Throw it away. Not even a starving vulture would eat it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by potterer View Post
    I must give you the classic recipe for the preparation & cooking of a cormorant. Having shot your cormorant, hold it well away from you as you carry it home; these birds are exceedingly verminous & lice are said to be not entirely host-specific. Hang up by the feet with a piece of wire, soak in petrol & set on fire. This treatment both removes most of the feathers and kills the lice. When the smoke has cleared away, take the cormorant down & cut off its beak…. bury the carcass preferablely in light sandy soil & leave it there for a fortnight. This is said to improve the flavour by, in part at least, removing the taste of rotting fish. Dig up & skin the bird. Place in a strong salt & water solution & soak for 48 hours. Remove, dry, stuff with whole unpeeled onions: the onion skins are supposed to bleach the meat to a small extent so that it is very dark brown as opposed to entirely black.
    Simmer gently in seawater, to which two tablespoons of chloride of lime has been added, for a further 6 hours. This has a further tenderising effect. Take out of the water & allow to dry, meanwhile mixing up a stiff paste of methylated spirit & curry powder. Spread this mixture liberally over the breast of the bird. Finally, roast in a very hot oven for 3 hours. The result is unbelievable. Throw it away. Not even a starving vulture would eat it.

    I seem to recall a story about it now being illegal to bury whales in your garden in Iceland. Sounds a similar taste. Take one whale, bury for six months: dig up and cut slices!

    Tyro
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    Default kookin

    I just love these recipes........sounds like something i would rustle up
    love alot, trust a few but always paddle your own canoe

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    Perhaps it's just the proximity to Halloween, but this is the scariest thread I have ever read on SotP!
    Juvanile delinkwit (retired), vaguely faffing around with a pair of pliers.

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    reminds me of the Lewis folk who eat gannet or guga as they call it

    one of the suggested recipes

    Line the bottom of a large pot with pebbles, place the guga on top and fill the pot with water and heat over an open fire, it is preferable to do this outdoors pehaps on the beach. As the water comes to the boil cover the pot with a lid. When the pebbles will take a fork, the guga is ready to eat.

    W

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    Cormorants - no recipes, one poem.

    The common cormorant or shag
    Lays eggs inside a paper bag
    The reason you will see no doubt
    It is to keep the lightning out
    But what these unobservant birds
    Have never noticed is that herds
    Of wandering bears may come with buns
    And steal the bags to hold the crumbs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by potterer View Post
    I must give you the classic recipe for the preparation & cooking of a cormorant. Having shot your cormorant, hold it well away from you as you carry it home; these birds are exceedingly verminous & lice are said to be not entirely host-specific. Hang up by the feet with a piece of wire, soak in petrol & set on fire. This treatment both removes most of the feathers and kills the lice. When the smoke has cleared away, take the cormorant down & cut off its beak…. bury the carcass preferablely in light sandy soil & leave it there for a fortnight. This is said to improve the flavour by, in part at least, removing the taste of rotting fish. Dig up & skin the bird. Place in a strong salt & water solution & soak for 48 hours. Remove, dry, stuff with whole unpeeled onions: the onion skins are supposed to bleach the meat to a small extent so that it is very dark brown as opposed to entirely black.
    Simmer gently in seawater, to which two tablespoons of chloride of lime has been added, for a further 6 hours. This has a further tenderising effect. Take out of the water & allow to dry, meanwhile mixing up a stiff paste of methylated spirit & curry powder. Spread this mixture liberally over the breast of the bird. Finally, roast in a very hot oven for 3 hours. The result is unbelievable. Throw it away. Not even a starving vulture would eat it.

    "Country man's cook book" isn't it, when I first read that I fell about laughing
    "Everyone looks after themselves
    only I look after myself"

  28. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundowner View Post
    "Country man's cook book" isn't it, when I first read that I fell about laughing
    Yes, 'tis.

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