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Thread: Vango Force 10 Classic Review

  1. #1

    Default Vango Force 10 Classic Review

    The orange Vango Force 10 tent is one of a small number of design classics that is iconic and still identifiable over 40 years since it was first introduced with its distinctive shape (and stealth tent colour ).

    It is still the benchmark for robustness both in extreme weather and longevity. This is all despite the rise of the lightweight funky shaped tunnel, dome and geodesic tents. So how has the design changed over the years and how is the current model in comparison to one that is 15 years old. Our family tent is a Vango Force 10 Mk5 Standard and has been used all round Scotland both on sites and remote wild camping, at sea level and in the mountains. The new tent is the Vango Classic Standard Mk3 which I’ve had the chance to use this year.

    Looking at the bag, for a two man tent, it’s not that different from the current batch of funky whizzy pitch themselves do it all tents. When I compared it to a Wildcountry Quasar two man tent there was not much difference in size.

    The only real difference is that the bag is orange, very orange and the feel of cotton is just nice compared to the manmade fabrics of most other tents. The tent including poles and pegs weighs in at 5.6kg. Also included is a very nice wee repair kit with spare clips and material.

    Once out the bag, being a Vango Force Ten, erection is simplicity it’s self. Peg out inner with sewn in ground sheet, put up the two A frame poles connected with a straight ridge.

    Put the pole ends into the brass eyes which ensures everything has the correct positioning, connect the inner to the fame with two clips at the apexes

    and another mid ridge, throw over the flysheet, connect the two mid panel clips and then the pegging point and peg out.

    No threading colour coded poles and working out what goes where. I still found that I could pitch this tent from bag to finish in well under 5mins on my own which is testament to its simplicity.

    The basic design has not changed from the 15 year old F10 but I have to say there are quite a few wee innovations that have added to its functionality. The door with its single curved zip works really well though I’m unsure if it is the same on the new Vango Force Ten Mk4 /5 as opposed to the old style Central full length and foot zips.

    The Poles fixing to the inner at the groundsheet pegging point, which means that it is very easy to pick up and move like modern geodesics.


    Other than that, nothing’s changed except the groundsheet material which though seeming lighter than the old green one, still appears to be a lot heavier and more robust than any modern tent I’ve seen. Certainly having used it last summer (???) with some heavy rain and soaking under foot conditions, it never leaked. The modern solution of ultra light tents with groundsheets that you could spit through then buying a heavy footprint is daft. The old heavy duty groundsheet is still to be beaten. The cotton material that the tent is made from appears to be similar to the old stuff but is advertised as DWR Cotton Protex which is presumably a modern waterproofing. It does work well and again it never leaked despite many damp days over the last year.

    As with most modern tents, there are Velcro patches down the fly zip. I find these a pain in the backside as they always catch the zip. The vent at the top of the door worked well letting air in and out without any midges. Inside it does not have the same amount of head space as tunnel or geodesic tents which have vertical walls. Same groundsheet space which for a two man tent is fine as long as you are lying down or sitting up along the middle. Plenty of pockets around the bottom of the inner where the old tent only has two.

    The one big advantage of a cotton tent is evident when you get up on a cold morning to a dry tent as it breathes. I’ve yet to try a man made fabric tent that does not suffer from bad condensation on the inner of the fly at least. They also feel warmer though whether that is due to the orange colour or what I don’t know.

    So, all in all I was pleasantly surprised that on the whole the Force 10 has not gone the same way as most other design icons with cheap materials and cutting corners. Would I buy another one to compliment my existing Mk5, definitely, especially when I see the complexity and fragility of modern tents. This one seems to be well built and the materials up to the Vango Force 10 standard but only having used it for a summer, only time will tell.
    Last edited by Chrish; 12th-March-2009 at 01:08 PM.
    Chris


  2. #2
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    A classic! You can see that by looking at how little it has changed since mine arrived one Christmas morning about 20-25 years ago.

    It was the same camouflage design when it was new - a bit faded these days.
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  3. #3
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    That takes me back. When I was a Scout, I often cursed the weight of the Force Tens, but I never had a rain soaked night in one.

    Excuse me, I feel a nostalgia moment coming along....
    Cheers, Michael.


    Brute Force and Ignorance is Vastly Underrated.

    "There is magic in the feel of a paddle and the movement of a canoe, a magic compounded of distance, adventure, solitude, and peace."
    -Sigurd Olson

  4. #4

    Default

    Good review and pictures. Just reinforced my desire to go and buy one now

  5. #5

    Default Group use

    Having used these tents all through my childhood, I now use them with groups of kids. They are the easiest tent for a group to put up, I can stand in the middle of a group and get all the tents up in 10-15mins. They are also bombproof or easily repaired. I would not choose one for myself due to weight and the sloping walls, but would look very closely with group tents.

    Tallboy

  6. #6

    Default

    We have a Mk 4 - I bought it second hand about 20 years ago and its still going strong. Our has the old type groundsheet (nylon coated in PVC on both sides). Apart from one small repair to the groundsheet all I've needed to do is reproof the fly with Fabsil now and again and replace the 'rubber bands' which lost their elasticity. The vivid orange is more like a pale pink on the fly now.
    We love this tent for winter camping. Cotton is much quieter than nylon and 'feels' warmer, tho' I doubt it actually is.
    A classic.

    Nick

  7. #7
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    Excellent tents.

    I Bought a mk2 (no longer made) in 1972 and still use it though patched up and reproofed a number of times.

    I think the extra warmth experienced is real not just imaginery.

    My theory is that the mesh inners of many modern tents are very permeable to the air to reduce the condensation problems which means any wind that gets inside the tent will disperse the heat generated from the occupants. The cotton inner is much more wind resistant so heat is retained inside (or escapes at a slower rate).

  8. #8

    Default

    I've seen quite a few 'Force 10s' over the years. My brother owned and used one for 26yrs. But interestingly, allthose people I've recently bought one, had not owen on before. And those who had owned one, opted for something else, even if they didn't need extra space or portablity.

    Great original design and I'm glad they're now making new. (On a special order, you could get bright red but most went for bright orange. You can still get the bright red, though I've only seen two of these.)

    TGB
    Last edited by TGB; 16th-January-2009 at 08:38 PM.
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

  9. #9
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    Classics never go out of date - it does what it says on the label. bomb proof.

    Brought to mind a group of lads I had camping up at Sty Head in the Lake District when one tent group discovered they had packed everything but the tent poles. The culprit was made to sleep outside by himself while his mates squashed in with others. Bet he didn't forget to check his gear again.
    Aslan




  10. #10
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    Thumbs up Tent Review

    Hi Chrish, thanks for that review very well presented, its just a case of accepting the new, and to get a combination of both old and new is a good thing.
    Enjoyed it, thanks for the time you took to do and present the review.
    Regards Bill

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    Good review Chish

    The only tent I own (and I own a few) that pitches as quick as my 10's is a Hex 3.

    I've use them on and off since my first purchase back in the late 60's, superb performance. Although I think the Hex would be as stong in high winds I'd feel safer in a 10 and your spot on about condensation, there is none.

    I'm taking a Mk5 on my 30th Jan trip, this is an old one I've been given and it will be its first outing in a good few years, I'll post some pics
    All the best,
    Richard
    Retired bushcrafter now happy camper

  12. #12

    Default

    Gosh - that takes me back a number of years! I remember those force 10 camping days with fondness, D of E expeditions in the Lakes and North Wales. I particulalry remember the warm orange glow inside the tent that gave the impression of sunshine despite the rain beating down on the flysheet.

    I am amazed that Vango have managed to keep this classic going for so long!

    Thanks for a great review and sparking many happy memories.

  13. #13
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    It is amazing to see a tent design that is so old still hold its own with all the innovations that have become the norm. I see they do a lightweight polyester version which has the option of green. I would love to see the cotton version available in green as I am not sure I could get on with a bright orange tent.
    John

    Now doing for dog owners what I inflicted on canoeists
    www.DogWalkBloggs.com

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rik_uk3 View Post
    Good review Chish

    The only tent I own (and I own a few) that pitches as quick as my 10's is a Hex 3.

    I've use them on and off since my first purchase back in the late 60's, superb performance. Although I think the Hex would be as stong in high winds I'd feel safer in a 10 and your spot on about condensation, there is none.

    I'm taking a Mk5 on my 30th Jan trip, this is an old one I've been given and it will be its first outing in a good few years, I'll post some pics

    If it is that one, the trip before last was to Glastonbury in 2000 (check the pockets ), then a trip to Sctoland in 2002.

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    Default vango force 10 review

    hello chrish, the classic tent design gives me the nostalgia thing too, in my motorcycle rallying days these tents were the no 1 choice of the 4 season rider , no2 ....maybe the blacks gypsy line in similar materials and design.orange is great when you are inside !!w
    "Every action of our lives touches on
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  16. #16

    Default

    The green nylon fly suffers from a part problem with condensation. The inner still being cotton breathes but it all then condensates on the outer. So when you exit the tent, like a modern tent, you get wet!

    As to the colour, with bright red / blue / yellow canoes, multi coloured PFD's and all the other bright clothing we use, orange looks quite classy . Okay, that excludes the bushy crafty dudes with dull Duluth packs.

    I find that the sloping walls are a benefit as well as a downside. Makes for good wind / rain shedding properties but inside you can only sit up in the middle, but then when in a hike tent you want to lie down anyway to either sleep, read or cook.
    Chris


  17. #17
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    Default quality cover

    Still after all these years.......the dog danglies!!

    good review chrish
    love alot, trust a few but always paddle your own canoe

  18. #18
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    Hi don't know if anyone is looking for a force 10 but I notice they are on special offer here

    http://www.sportswarehouse.co.uk/aca..._MK5.html#aMK5

    Don't know if its a good deal or not.

    Neil
    Just realised lots of don't knows here - don't know why

  19. #19
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    Out scout troop had them back in the 70s.

    A good point is that you can put the frame and fly up before the inner. Which was quite handy after we'd walked 6 miles in heavy persistent rain. We then got the paraffin stove on to dry out and then put the inner up.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  20. #20
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    We have a set of these at school - the flys are now a very pale peach/ cream colour on the outside, but still that vibrant orange inside!
    Fran



  21. #21
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    Fantastic Tent. I, too, recently bought a new one because I always wanted one, and I also managed to acquire a second hand front flysheet bell-end extension and poles to go with it. What a tent !

    PWC
    PWC
    ___________________________________
    Know less, carry more - you're in a canoe !

  22. #22

    Default

    I got a second hand one for my 10th birthday when I was in the cubs some 28ish years ago, and it's still working well.
    Long Live the Force 10

  23. #23
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    Great review and great tent! My Relum Mk3 is very similar but an all over beige instead of the stealth option. Not sure I could get on with a bright orange tent, either!
    Chaste Snow-drop, venturous harbinger of Spring,
    And pensive monitor of fleeting years!


  24. #24

    Default

    Well a few weeks ago I went into nostalgia mode and bought a F10 Mk 3 on ebay, 30 years since I last used a bright orange ridge. Its been used several times since and is so much better than the nylon domes I have been using. Is the orange too bright.... NO.

    Its not got as much head room as some, its not trendy, but what a well made tent. As good today as its always been.

  25. #25
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    Default Force Ten

    Funny, I read this review 2 weeks ago, seaching for reviews on these very tents, I would like a MK 5, and am looking to get one, eventually. But reading this review has convinced me to get one, thanks, Andy

  26. #26
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    I paid a massive £36.00 for my first proper tent, a Force10 MK4. I got a bit of discount as I worked Saturdays at a camping and caravan shop (£1.50 a day wages. We're going back a while) It was used for backpacking all year round with the tent flysheet and pegs/poles split between 3 of us. It got flattened twice in Edale on two consecutive years, the alloy poles were the weak link in extreme weather. We used to hike frome home on boxing day (we would have gone on Christmas day but parents wouldn't let us) out into Kinder in the peak district and stop out until trench foot or hypothermia took hold. The knackered poles were eventually replaced with steel ones and the tent did years of motorbike rallies again in all conditions all year round. One January on the moors above Hebden Bridge we recorded minus 16 degrees. In the morning we couldn't get the pegs out of the frozen ground. If anyone wants a spare set I reckon I can more or less remember where they are. The tent must have spent months and months set up in all conditions and never let us down. the groundsheet would stay waterproof with up to 3" of water around like having your own waterbed. Eventually after around 25 years of use the flysheet, faded and deteriorated just gave up, ripping one windy night and with the cost of a new one a tad steep the inner went to the local scouts and a new 'high tech' tent was purchased,then another then another then another. They are all c**p by comparison. One day I'll buy another F10 and do it all again.
    Cheers
    Paul

  27. #27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyJ View Post
    Funny, I read this review 2 weeks ago, seaching for reviews on these very tents, I would like a MK 5, and am looking to get one, eventually. But reading this review has convinced me to get one, thanks, Andy
    The Mk5 is the business. Don't bother with the extention as it's made of nylon. When I get around to it I'm going to adapt a spare Mk5 flysheet which will be much better and more spacious. Might even put in a vent for a woodburning stove.

    Quote Originally Posted by paulsmith View Post
    I paid a massive £36.00 for my first proper tent, a Force10 MK4. I got a bit of discount as I worked Saturdays at a camping and caravan shop (£1.50 a day wages. We're going back a while)...
    You must be really old!
    Chris


  28. #28
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    Thanks for that Chrish, all the convincing I needed! SHMBO isn't convinced I need "Another" tent, 2 Juno Vango teepees, which are superb.
    My Daughter has just returned from Austria-a 2 week trip with the Guides, both Vango's perfomrmed spot on, surviving 2 major storms.
    But it's not a Force ten!! Have Gelert, Blacks, etc, good tents for what they are.....Thanks, Andy

  29. #29
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    You must be really old!
    Cheeky monkey. I'm not that old I just started early
    Paul.

  30. #30

    Default

    Nice to see these still around - I'm another one who's had good experiences with these, both my own and with Scouts.

    Two tips :

    1) Attach the A pieces to a pole section with a bit of cord - they tend to go walk-about otherwise! It's also worth carrying a spare - -

    2) The "spike" can easily tear the fly if it's just thrown over the frame - once we taught the Scouts to guide it on by holding the eyelet in their hand (at each end) we had far fewer damaged tents!

    I never, ever, had one of these fail in use - although we did find that the cotton flys beneffited from being treated with proofer as horizontal rain from the side did result in one rather wet night on Skye!

    Mike

  31. #31
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    Default blimey

    that takes me back to about 1985 I was kayaking down the Mon and woke up one morning in a force ten with the ceiling black with midges ............ it was like a vision of hell!!

    But great review and I think a cracking tent too - whats the RRP on them these days?
    www.nordmarkencanoeuk.co.uk Scandinavian specialist in canoe, hunting, fishing and bushcraft

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  32. #32

    Smile Vango Force 10

    I have just taken out of the attic and put up my 36-year old Mark 3 Force 10 which my son is using on his Duke of Edinburgh Award yomp over the South Downs this weekend. What a tent! It first "went high" with me in Montenegro many years ago and just the smell of it takes me back to that and many another holiday. It's as good as new, barring some slight ageing to the rubber loops. Well done Vango!

  33. #33
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    Default Superb tents

    When my wife & I were just married we bought a cheapy tent from Millets and went camping to Edale with friends. The first night the wind whipped down the valley and ripped the tent apart at the seams ... arggh! Millets said they'd had a bad batch (single, not double stitched) and offered to replace it ... we held out for a refund on the basis of "Not of merchandisable quality" ... and spent more too on a PROPER TENT. A Vango Mk5 with the cotton extension too, that was 30yrs ago and it's still going strong. Really warm, November camping in Norfolk the "hot orange" camoflage was obscured by thick white frost but we were toastie inside. It has the original lightweight nylon inner tent, I recently bought a second hand cotton inner test of the right (orange) colour ... and if we use that it's warmer still. When we needed a couple of extra tents, 6ft son & friend ... what did we get ... second hand orange Mk3s ... bombproof, unflattenable and if looked after last for ever.
    Last edited by Potty Paddler; 16th-January-2011 at 10:48 PM.

  34. #34

    Wink Vango

    Mine is as old as I am(41) and still works I think? as I've got so many tents,tarps,hammocks,teppees, family tents and swags that it doesn't get a look in any more. I blame this forum and the bushcraftuk for constantly flashing nice gear at me and my weak willed wallet!!! But boy did I love that tent and extention untill I had to lug it solo across Holland as my mates pack was to small to fit any of the cumbersome Force 10 in !!! I wish they had kilogram tents back then! \only damage sustained was when a mates Alsation decided to sleep on the front A frame both sides during the night. Now still a bit banana shaped. What gear they made back then!
    Last edited by climb_paddle_play; 17th-January-2011 at 12:35 AM.
    There is nothing—
    absolute nothing—half so much worth
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  35. #35
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    Default Vango Force 10 Classic

    Oh ... and Orange is far faster than Green

    I've a second hand green Mk3, synthetic fly not cotton, the previous owner tried reproofing it with (fabsil?) and it stripped the inner "rubbery" layer from the fabric ... still the rest of the tent is good as spares for the proper stealth coloured orange ones

  36. #36
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    You can get spares here - I can't vouch for the supplier personally as I have not used them.

  37. #37

    Default I bought one of these and can recommend

    I got one of the force ten mark 4's - officially a 3 man tent - but more like 2 man with room for equipment. Used it on district scout camp in wales and it was good. Cotton allowed the tent to breathe and didn't suffer from loads of condensation like modern polyester/nylon vango equinox 350's the scouts had. its a touch heavy at around 8kg although i have a 2 nylon summer tents (4/5 person) that weigh far more so depends on your perspective. It was fairly warm but best bit is it's VERY quick to erect and take down. ground sheet is tough as old boots and helps insulate you. I noticed a an old school scout leader and group with 4 x vango force ten mk2/3's - one scout fell on on of the force ten tents and bounced off! the tent was totally rock solid - would like to see a cheap dome with fibre glass poles stand up to that type of abuse! my force ten was fairly cosy - the kids complained it was cold in the equinox... interesting as they are not the cheap end of modern vango's. Love my force ten and can't wait to use it again - ASAP.

  38. #38

    Default on tripping on guy lines and postscript

    Kids tripped on my guylines of force ten loads and they didn't snap. Tripped on vango equinox and plastic rings snapped and had to be replaced. nuff said.

    When i take my force ten i "know" i'm going to be ok and not suffer from cold, equipment failure, etc. it gives you peace of mind you don't get with anything other than spending a lot on modern styles.

  39. #39

    Default 'Bell-end' extension???

    Quote Originally Posted by Perthshire Wood Canvas View Post
    Fantastic Tent. I, too, recently bought a new one because I always wanted one, and I also managed to acquire a second hand front flysheet bell-end extension and poles to go with it. What a tent !

    PWC
    Just wondered if you knew where to obtain these...
    Not for me you understand...
    It's for a 'friend'

  40. #40
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    Default "Bell End" Extension

    Quote Originally Posted by Potty Paddler View Post
    Vango don't seem to make the extensions any more ... options, I suppose, are ...


    1. Ring Vango and see if they can do you one?
    2. Search for a second hand extension (eBay etc)
    3. Get one made up by someone other than Vango (you'd still need the poles etc)
    4. Source a second hand tent ... just the ridge, one "A" frame and the flysheet (outer tent) would do and then adapt the flysheet to make your extension .... the advantage of the "adaption" method is that you'd end up with a bigger extension than Vango's own.

    Good luck, the extension makes a brilliant tent better still ... and no mine's not for sale .
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  41. #41

    Default Ah, Just the person...

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidSC View Post
    I have just taken out of the attic and put up my 36-year old Mark 3 Force 10 which my son is using on his Duke of Edinburgh Award yomp over the South Downs this weekend. What a tent! It first "went high" with me in Montenegro many years ago and just the smell of it takes me back to that and many another holiday. It's as good as new, barring some slight ageing to the rubber loops. Well done Vango!
    Hi david , i've just acquired one of these but , easy as it was to erect, I couldn't work out how to connect the poles with the mushroom feet , to the tent at the bottom.
    I can't believe they're just left unattached , as I'm sure the poles would end up
    'splaying-out' and damaging the plastic bits at the top that they slot in to.
    Any advice would be appreciated as, although I've got several tents, this one is crying out to be used!

  42. #42

    Default I phoned vango...

    Quote Originally Posted by Potty Paddler View Post
    Vango don't seem to make the extensions any more ... options, I suppose, are ...


    1. Ring Vango and see if they can do you one?
    2. Search for a second hand extension (eBay etc)
    3. Get one made up by someone other than Vango (you'd still need the poles etc)
    4. Source a second hand tent ... just the ridge, one "A" frame and the flysheet (outer tent) would do and then adapt the flysheet to make your extension .... the advantage of the "adaption" method is that you'd end up with a bigger extension than Vango's own.
    Good luck, the extension makes a brilliant tent better still ... and no mine's not for sale .
    .... But the young lady giggled and said 'ah, shame'! when I said I needed a bell-end extension!

  43. Default hip hip!

    So many good memories in these tents!

    Long-live the Vango Force 10's

  44. #44
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by green--arrow View Post
    Hi david , i've just acquired one of these but , easy as it was to erect, I couldn't work out how to connect the poles with the mushroom feet , to the tent at the bottom.
    I can't believe they're just left unattached , as I'm sure the poles would end up
    'splaying-out' and damaging the plastic bits at the top that they slot in to.
    Any advice would be appreciated as, although I've got several tents, this one is crying out to be used!
    Not David ... but they don't need attaching at the bottom of the tent ... the "Y" pieces on my MK5 are metal and stronger ... on my Mk3's plastic as you describe ... but they both work really well in the same manner, pin out the inner groundsheet, put together the A frames, bridge the inner and pop on the ridge, clip the ends of the inner tent to the "Y" pieces and clip the centre to the ridge pole. Ideally get a friend to cover the spikes with a hand as the flysheet is put in place taking care not to hole the tent. The side seams run down the "A" frames and the pegs holding the elastics at these points have the double function of stopping the "A" frames from splaying. Abridged instructions but you get the idea.

    If it's really wet it's possible to pitch the outer tent on it's poles and then put up the inner tent from the inside to keep it dry ... or at east drier.

    Can't imagine what the young lady at Vango was giggling at, shouldn't laugh at folks deficiencies, in the tent department.
    Last edited by Potty Paddler; 19th-April-2011 at 08:16 PM.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  45. #45

    Default Vango 'bandy-legs'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Potty Paddler View Post
    Not David ... but they don't need attaching at the bottom of the tent ... the "Y" pieces on my MK5 are metal and stronger ... on my Mk3's plastic as you describe ... but they both work really well in the same manner, pin out the inner groundsheet, put together the A frames, bridge the inner and pop on the ridge, clip the ends of the inner tent to the "Y" pieces and clip the centre to the ridge pole. Ideally get a friend to cover the spikes with a hand as the flysheet is put in place taking care not to hole the tent. The side seams run down the "A" frames and the pegs holding the elastics at these points have the double function of stopping the "A" frames from splaying. Abridged instructions but you get the idea.

    If it's really wet it's possible to pitch the outer tent on it's poles and then put up the inner tent from the inside to keep it dry ... or at east drier.

    Can't imagine what the young lady at Vango was giggling at, shouldn't laugh at folks deficiencies, in the tent department.
    Thanks for that - I just came in from the garden where i've been sewing up a hole in the inner tent - ( it's why I was given it for nowt!)
    The missus wouldn't come and look because it 'smells funny'. I keep tellin her - it's the smell of canvas - the smell of classic camping!

    The folk at vango are innocent - I just HAD to comment on a 'bell-end' extension!

  46. #46
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    Default "Smells funny"

    Quote Originally Posted by green--arrow View Post
    Thanks for that - I just came in from the garden where i've been sewing up a hole in the inner tent - ( it's why I was given it for nowt!)
    The missus wouldn't come and look because it 'smells funny'. I keep tellin her - it's the smell of canvas - the smell of classic camping!

    The folk at vango are innocent - I just HAD to comment on a 'bell-end' extension!
    At least your's smells of canvas, one of my Mk3s, bought from eBay smelt very strongly of a sickly flowery perfume , tried airing it in a scout hut for an hour or so, came back and had to open all the windows & doors to try and air the smell out of the hut jus so we could go back in there. It turns out the seller had added fabric conditioner to the tent, we'd guess a whole bottle. We washed it several times, put it up outside and left it for a week or two to be aired and washed by the rain. Eventually we got rid of enough of the pong that we thought it might be worth trying to re-proof it again with Fabsil. That worked and it now keeps out the rain as it should do ... but the pong still lingers, slightly.

    Never ever take fabric conditioner anywhere near a tent
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  47. #47

    Default Force ten ....

    ~ and never share a two man tent with someone with a 'bell-end extension'

  48. #48
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    Default

    If you want a Bell end extension, buy a set of poles and a ridge and a spare flysheet - either new or on *bay, and cannibalise it. 30 min job with a sewing machine.
    PWC
    ___________________________________
    Know less, carry more - you're in a canoe !

  49. #49
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    Default Pitching Instructions

    Good grief .... Vango have posted a web version of the pitching instructions for the classic Force Tens ... I can't remember ever getting something like this with my brand new Mk5 ... or that I needed it ... but that was about 35yrs ago.

    Here's the link ... http://www.vango.co.uk/index.php?opt...product_id=266 ... I must read it and see if I've been doing anything wrong for all these years ... as my tent is still going strong I suspect the answer is no
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  50. #50
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    Default

    Ah that's how you pitch it!
    PWC
    ___________________________________
    Know less, carry more - you're in a canoe !

  51. #51

    Default force ten for two quid!

    Reading this thread I realised that the tent that I bought from a car boot sale about two years ago for two quid is a force ten!

    The woman selling it said she was having a clearout whilst the husband was away - bet he was less than pleased to find his vango gone.

    It's an old one with faded canvas and a few patches to the ground sheet and the vango label on the fly came off in my hand when I looked at it, but it's still a good tent and we will be spending a month in it in Devon and Cornwall this summer.

    The missus thinks I'm mad, but old stuff that has survived has proved itself to be reliable. I, like others have bought new stuff that lasted a season or two and then needed replacing.

    cheers, winny

  52. #52
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by winny View Post
    Reading this thread I realised that the tent that I bought from a car boot sale about two years ago for two quid is a force ten!

    The woman selling it said she was having a clearout whilst the husband was away - bet he was less than pleased to find his vango gone ....

    cheers, winny
    Good grief ... he must have done something really really bad to deserve that

    Have fun with your £2 Vango ... here's our camp on the Wye last weekend, Mk5 + 2x Mk4s, magic tents ... and yes the canoe is strapped to the top of the car ready to go to our put-in.

    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  53. #53

    Default new vango Mark three

    I have just joined this site primarily so i could post my experiences with one of the new Mark111 vangos.

    Like most people I am familiar with the vango tent and had used them many years ago. So when looking for a new winter tent (camping in the Uk) I was delighted to see these at £160 (much reduced from RRP) and bought one. We have used it once last weekend on a windy night in the peak district.

    WORDS CANNOT BEGIN TO DESCRIBE HOW DISAPPOINTED I WAS WITH THIS TENT!!!!!!!

    The basic design has not altered and there are a few detail changes BUT. There is something wrong with the cut of the inner tent. It doesn't matter how you pitch it, the inner tent is very loose and saggy. The tensioner that links to the flysheet is too long and has no effect. The Fly puts up normally and is resonably taught but inside the tent the space available is drastically cut down by loose flapping material. So on a windy night two people huddle together in the centre of the tent and spend all night with a face full of flapping canvas.

    I actually took this tent back to the retailer and got a refund

    I strongly suspect (but have no proof) that this version is made by a different factory (china?) and hasn't got the pattern or design right. It is very noticable that this version is widely available in the UK from a range of retailers at a much reduced price which now makes me very suspicious.

    Anyway feel free to disagree with me, this was my experience and one of the reasons I bought it was because of this review and thread so I felt justified in registering to put in a counter argument. In all fairness to the original reviewer they did say they had only used it in summer and perhaps they had a different batch.

    I did want to put in a counter though to avoid other people having the same experience, don't buy one on the reputation and only buy if you can see it put up.

    Dave

  54. #54

    Default Still going strong...

    Perhaps you got a rogue unit????
    Mine's going strong after 30 years, only had four new flys and three new inners.
    (oh and some poles)

  55. #55

    Default Vango F10 MK5 pole feet problem

    Vango F10 MK5
    I could not erect my newly purchased Vango F10MK5 to looktaught and neat there was baggy wrinkles in the flysheet and the inner tent wasbaggy. I downloaded the pitching instructions for the classic standard and CN.I could not follow instruction 5: as my tent had large plastic feet with bluntpoints to them but the instruction 5: referred to the legs having spikes that should passthrough the eyelet of the ground sheet. The flysheet instruction 4: also referredto the need to secure the flysheet anchor strap via the eyelet tothe spikes at the base of the legs this I could not do as the
    legs had those bluntplastic feet?


    I e-mailed Vango to ask for clarification of there the pitching instructions and was advised tofollow the pitching instructions for the outdoor special .

    The tent was then erectedfollowing the outdoor special instructions as advised by Vango with the A frame legs not being secured atall to the ground sheet they were able to take-up whatever position this caused the inner tent to be lose andbaggy the flysheet was impossible to tension without diagonal ripples and wavy skirt line the whole thing looked likea Paralytic giraffe draped in a deflated hot air balloon.


    There had to be a reason for this I looked again at thefirst set of pitching instructions and focused on the reference of spikes atthe bottom of the legs that were absent from my leg poles I now worked out thatif the legs were secured in the position of the ground sheet eyelet and theeyelet of the fly sheet anchor strap were secured together the poles and canvaslooked like a tent. Now the modification to the feet of the legs I drilled and inserted spikes into the feetof the legs with epoxy glue and pined .



    This held the legssecurely in the correct position to the ground sheet when the anchor strapseyelets of the flysheet were secured with the spikes the tent had nowtaken on a ridged self supporting structure on its own. As I pegged the tent Inoticed that were the elastic loops were fitted this allowed the fly to self adjustso I then fitted elastic loops to all the other pegging points this allowed thetent to have equal tension all over the tent which was now was a totaltransformation from the flapping sagging disappointment that I first erected. Thetent was now taught with no sagging inner tent and those diagonal ripplesacross the flysheet had gone.


    So what have I used 4x spikes fixed with epoxy glue andpinned . elastic cord made in to loops cordless drill and scissors.

    What I have achieved is a neat taught sturdy tent.

  56. #56

    Default

    Just happened on this forum while looking for a Vango Force 10. Would like to add my endorsement. I first came across these tents when my flatemate persuaded me to go climbing in the Lake district in January. Absolutely fantastic tent and kept us warm and dry the entire weekend. When I bought my first Force 10 I was persuaded thatChris Bonnington used same on everest base camp. Later on a walking holiday in the peak district I had the priviledge of attending a talk by the lat Pete Boardman on a climb of K2. He had an amazing slide of a Vango Force 10 inner roped to a vertical rock face. Apparently after the first night they didn't bother to clip themselves to the mountain and just relied on th eForce 10 - Awesome. I would NOT recommend trying it though.


    Just about the best tent around and so easy to pitch I could even manage it in a state of seriously advanced refreshment in the garden of a pub.

    Back to the internet. I want one.

  57. #57
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    Default

    16 yrs of age, ns hall, joy's and tribulations of finding out about girls....! But hey, we, the three of us, decided to buy a tent.

    We bought a vango st mk5ot a clue as to what I want to do in life.

    two of my "Mates" went to Norwich City College to do A levls, why not thinks I, I haven't got a bloody clue as to what to do, so Ok! Frisbee in the sport

  58. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Default

    Hall, girls and a new tent a Vango ST Mk5, wish I still had it now... WE backpacked it everywhere and shared the weight between us...

    I really miss it, espicially when Vango brought out the extension.
    Why do company;s create something so iconic and then stop doing it/

    This was the tent which set thousands of climbers onto the high peaks....
    I would really love to be able to get one with the extension now.

    Alan L.

  59. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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    Default

    Sorry for the poor format, in austria, bad connection and very poor light....

  60. #60

    Default

    Just bought one on eBay - Mk4 Force 10..... GBP100

    Hey ho, some you win some you loose, but if it ias as the poster describes it is still a bargain,, new price GBP380

    best regards

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