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Thread: Airbags - Do we really need then Take 2

  1. #1
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    Default Airbags - Do we really need then Take 2

    You may recall that I asked this question earlier in the year. I have to confess that until Wednesday evening I had done nothing other procrastinate for the following reasons.
    • I have been sticking my head in the sand telling myself they are not necessary for us.
    • Given that we paddle with kids and sometimes camping kit I am reluctant to surrender a large amount of stowage space
    • I suffer from the standard genetic Yorkshire trait of having short arms (and extremely long pockets).
    Joking apart I had a little incident whilst paddling my k k on my own which unexpectedly left me in the water thinking how did that happen? No harm was done; I clipped my swim line to the front and swam to shore, emptied out the water and continued on my way.

    However it did get me thinking. Most of the time we paddle the canoe on our own and therefore if we do ever capsize it is more than likely that we are going to have to self-rescue. I can now understand how difficult is would be to recover a swamped canoe without airbags, which would substantially heavier than a kayak, 2 (possibly upset) children plus our gear to the nearest bank

    My advice therefore to anybody who paddles solo (as in 1 canoe) is listen the more experienced SotP members make sure you properly prepared and get yourself some airbags.

    I would therefore like to thank Dave at Endless River for his patience while I dusted of the moths and prised my card out of my wallet.

    My therapist has recommended the following treatment, J-Stroke 45 times per minute, 5 hours a day, 3 times a week, 50 weeks a year.oh, and a couple of practice capsizes
    Last edited by MagiKelly; 10th-June-2006 at 09:32 AM. Reason: Fix Font

  2. #2
    monkey_pork's Avatar
    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
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    Airbags were the very first bit of outfitting to go into my boat.
    I had mine done in the shop before the boat even hit the water.

    My view is that I'd prefer to surrender a couple o' hundred litres of storage space, knowing that the same couple hundred litres wouldn't fill up with water either. I know gear displaces water, but not quite like big vinyl bags of air.

    Good call in getting yourself a set.


  3. #3

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    Airbags. Bigger the better! 60" air bags in each end of my prospector 16. They went in before the seats etc... The seats fitted around the air bags.

    You want them to stay in the boat as well so if fitting them attach them to your boat not the Gunwhales. P clips work really well but gunwhales can fall off. Taking your air bags with them. Lace your boat, attach to the lacing and then secure to as many other points as you can. D Rings etc... At the last scottish symposium I drove to Grandtully and there was a trail of air bags at the side of the road. Hopefully this won't be happening at this years!

    Hope the air bags mean you enjoy your boat for longer.

    G

  4. #4
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    I used P-clips to secure them which wasn't too difficult.

    I have found one disadvantage, I found these little blighters hidding under the bow airbag when we got back from Saturday's trip..... I have no idea how we managed to pick up these two stowaways.


  5. #5
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    Some interesting comments here. I have just bought a boat spending everything I had on it. Instead of spending 90+ on bags i have used old Land Rover inner tubes covered by sleeping mats secured by a strap with D-ring and laced into the boat. Will this be suitable or just me being to coin a phrase 'a yorkshire man with short arms and deep pockets'?

  6. #6
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    Your inner tubes are probably better as long as they are big enough and securely fastened. Less likely to get punctured I reckon ...
    Happy paddling ,
    Rob.


  7. #7

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    Inner Tubes are heavier than air bags so will make the boat weigh more. If you are worried about punctures then go with Aiguilles light weight blocks. Light and tough. What could be better. (Well cheaper)

    Enjoy

    G

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunburyAndy
    I used P-clips to secure them which wasn't too difficult.

    I have found one disadvantage, I found these little blighters hidding under the bow airbag when we got back from Saturday's trip..... I have no idea how we managed to pick up these two stowaways.

    These will not cause problems, but grit and sand etc will cause your air bags to wear out faster than otherwise. I remove airbags after every major trip, and after every couple of short river trips, maybe whilst the shuttle is being run. The airbags move about during transport, if only a little, and the grit abraides the nylon.

    It is quite a bit of hassle, and most folk don't bother. Maybe I'm just fussy?
    If it wasn't for the rain in our lives there would be no rivers. X 2

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