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Thread: Sanding Dust Filler

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Ex Sunny Cornwall UK - Now Portland NW USA
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    Question Sanding Dust Filler

    Can I use the dust from a sanding machine as a thickening agent for epoxy on basic filleting and fairing on my build project?
    We have a 900mm wide speed sander in our workshops which produces a lot of of dust into bags.
    Its mainly solid timber dust but small amounts of MDF - Not sure if the adhesive in MDF will react with epoxy in a negative way
    I realise the hazard with MDF dust but I'm not sure it's no different to epoxy dust health wise, so mask is required
    Not that I'm a cheap skate you understand - I like to think of it as Re-cycling
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    I don't see why not!

    When I ran out of filleting blend, I switched to using the contents of my belt sander mixed in with small amounts of microfibres and colloidal silica for good measure. This worked just as well as the posh stuff, and even matched the colour better since it was essentially the same wood.

    I know someone who did a fibreglass repair on a chartered yacht by using talcum powder to thicken / colour up the epoxy. Blended in perfectly so you'd never have known......
    The Canoeist's prayer: "Lord grant me the serenity to walk the portages I must, The courage to run the rapids I can, And the wisdom to know the difference".

    John Muir Trust - Wild Places for Nature & People.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    West London, UK
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    I used tesco value plain flour to do the fillets on my stitch and tape pirogue, it did the job and the odd lumps of the stuff I keep finding around the garden are rock hard. (sold the boat)

    People actually buy 'wood flour' which I assume is just the sawdust from the mill.
    It all started with a folding boat I built at school...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    calgary alberta canada
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    Yes use saw dust it works great and like you say it matches the color better.I have also used chalk for my chalkline to do repairs on fiberglass boats,just takes a bit of testing to get the color right

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobgoblin View Post
    I used tesco value plain flour to do the fillets on my stitch and tape pirogue, it did the job and the odd lumps of the stuff I keep finding around the garden are rock hard. (sold the boat)

    People actually buy 'wood flour' which I assume is just the sawdust from the mill.
    Hi Hobgoblin
    if I need a loaf I know where to come ! for the record wood flour is not just sawdust or sanding dust, it is ground as you would grind bread flour only it is ground to a specific size the size we use is the finest you can achieve which is 200 mesh which is in fact finer than flour. Our high density filleting blend is not just ground wood but a combination of wood fibres and cotton microfibres and a couple of other organic ground flours to act as a thixothropic agent, it ain't just sawdust

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    West London, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by epoxymanuk View Post
    Hi Hobgoblin
    if I need a loaf I know where to come ! for the record wood flour is not just sawdust or sanding dust, it is ground as you would grind bread flour only it is ground to a specific size the size we use is the finest you can achieve which is 200 mesh which is in fact finer than flour. Our high density filleting blend is not just ground wood but a combination of wood fibres and cotton microfibres and a couple of other organic ground flours to act as a thixothropic agent, it ain't just sawdust
    epoxymanuk, my own personal assumption buster!

    That answer blows another assumtion out of the water too. I thought my plain flour would have been less than perfect because it was too fine, but it seems Woodflour is even finer. The other interesting thing is that I assume propper woodflour (even without the cotton) is much much stronger because it is ground and therefore keeps it fibres, where as sanding dust is just dust???

    I'd put a fresh loaf in the machine for you, but we had to throw away all the flour in the house last summer because someone 'tidied' my bag up and the risk of consuming GRP materials wasnt worth the cost of the flour.

    Cheers
    It all started with a folding boat I built at school...

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobgoblin View Post
    epoxymanuk, my own personal assumption buster!

    That answer blows another assumtion out of the water too. I thought my plain flour would have been less than perfect because it was too fine, but it seems Woodflour is even finer. The other interesting thing is that I assume propper woodflour (even without the cotton) is much much stronger because it is ground and therefore keeps it fibres, where as sanding dust is just dust???

    I'd put a fresh loaf in the machine for you, but we had to throw away all the flour in the house last summer because someone 'tidied' my bag up and the risk of consuming GRP materials wasnt worth the cost of the flour.

    Cheers
    I look forward to the loaf , can I have toast ?

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