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Thread: All Paddled out

  1. #1
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    Default All Paddled out

    This is my first attempt at blogging.
    So I thought I'd do one about the paddles I made whilst waiting for the weather to warm up so I could do the Stitch & Glue
    It started like this -
    Ash Shaft with Cedar wings.

    You can just see the panel pins, they are to locate the cedar when glueing up.




    Cut the panel pins back to about 2mm


    Then I pushed the cedar onto the cut pins without any glue so they made little indents into the cedar


    It save having to stop the wings sliding out of line when clamping .

    I used Cascamite for this as it is a glue I am used to using


    Clamped !

    Some severe sanding and shaping (apologies for no pics - but sanding is pretty boring) about 10 coats of Danish Oil later and Voila



    I let in some Iroko slips on the top of the handle just for aesthetics



    Then followed a second pair WTS
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  2. #2
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    Default

    Wow, what a lovely pair of paddles.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  3. #3
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    Default

    They're so pretty. I wouldn't be able to use 'em, I'd have to hang them on the wall in the living room.

  4. #4

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    Very nice, a proper credit to you. I just wish I had the time, patiance,and skill to make my own paddle.
    Last edited by retro; 13th-March-2008 at 09:42 AM.


  5. #5
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    They look first class. I am sure your canoe is going to be a cracker.

  6. #6
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    Default Class!

    Definitely a 'class act' there! The construction looked straight forward so thanks for posting, I might need it. What did the wood cost if I may be so bold? Also have you had much experience with cascamite? What limitations have you found using it.

    Cheers, Peter.
    Older, but no wiser!

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
    Definitely a 'class act' there! The construction looked straight forward so thanks for posting, I might need it. What did the wood cost if I may be so bold? Also have you had much experience with cascamite? What limitations have you found using it.

    Cheers, Peter.
    What he said.

    I've used cascamite for eons - no real problems but it is not gap-filling so a good supply of clamps is in order. - it sometimes goes by the name of "Extramite" - which is, I'm told, the same stuff.

  8. #8
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    Very, Very impressive. The best I can manage is to modify my existing paddles. Usually unintentionally
    Leone_blanco

  9. #9
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    Default Thanks Guys

    Thank you for the positive comments I think it took me longer to put the blog together than make the paddles
    ( only joking - I'm no tech head )

    So full credit goes to my lovely daughter for her help & advice on blogging and posting pics, IF IN DOUBT ask a teenager ( while they still know it all )

    I did actually stand back and look at these and thought they ought to be hanging on the wall but alas my good lady doesn't share my artistic leanings, so they will be limited to pond life only no rocks or shallow WW for these

    The timber was sourced from a selection of off cuts where I work ( a joinery company) one of the perks I guess. but our retail cost for these pieces would only be about £ 10
    I will be posting pics etc of others I've made in due course.
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  10. #10
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    Default Cascamite

    I've used cascamite for years in joinery applications and it is a superb adhesive. We did try Polyurethane glue on some framing applications and it was way too easy to dismantle the joint weeks later!
    For paddles Cascamite is fine as there is no real shock or stress that would break the glue line before the timber cracked. It is a resin based glue so it Sticks!!
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  11. #11
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    Default Ta!

    Thanks for the 'Cascamite' info guys, most useful!
    Older, but no wiser!

  12. #12
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    Default Second set of Paddles

    Not too many 'making' pics but the process was the same.
    I used a softwood broom handle for the shaft 95p from a DIY shop near you
    The blades are Utile which is a member of the Mahogany family -good straight grain fairly dense but not too heavy. between the blades and the shaft I have glued in a strip of 6mm birch ply



    I really like the laminated 'on edge' effect this gives especially as I tapered the shaft first which leads to this effect when the blades are feathered into the shaft profile like this



    Because I wanted to achieve a more tapered design I also glued on a softwood strip to each side for more width to work with. I had decided to model this VERY loosley on an Algonquin. but they have turned out with a heavy look to them though they are actually light.



    I do like contrasting timber and when its Oiled the colours are soooo rich



    The Tee handle was not supposed to be this wide but after swinging it about a bit in the garage and praticing the 'J' stroke sitting on a stool it felt very user friendly, besides I can always cut it shorter later
    It is a stub mortice & tenon joint with a couple of small hardwood wedges to help take the strain. The hardwood spots on the shaft are purely decorative.
    You can just see a slight 'scalloping' on the underside of the handle this is the beauty of making your own paddles they fit my hands

    Again I used lots of coats of Danish Oil, the first is thinned down 50/50 with white spirit so it really soaks in and gives a better seal to the surface.
    On the previous Paddles I brushed the Oil on then left it for 10 mins and wiped it off, which worked fine, this time I used a rag to apply the oil in a similar style to french polishing, this means no wiping off but also provides more of a lustre to the finished job
    More pics to follow Photobucket is on shutdown
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  13. #13
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    Default

    Really great paddles!
    Can´t wait to see your stitch´n glue. No I won´t, because then I have to burn mine. just kiddin´

    Best Regards from Germany

    Andreas

  14. #14
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    Default

    youve certainly got a skill for paddle making - I like the plywood feature stripes, very proffesional looking.

    So when do you start taking commisions?
    It all started with a folding boat I built at school...

  15. #15

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhand View Post
    This is my first attempt at blogging.
    So I thought I'd do one about the paddles I made whilst waiting for the weather to warm up so I could do the Stitch & Glue
    It started like this -
    Ash Shaft with Cedar wings.
    Those paddles look great. I have just ordered up two ash planks so that I can make paddles for my canoe when it’s finished. I hope they turn out to look as good as yours. If I get stuck I’ll know who to turn to!
    Cheers, Dave.
    Last edited by MagiKelly; 14th-March-2008 at 02:39 PM. Reason: quote tags

  16. #16

    Default

    Another very tasty looking paddle


  17. #17
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    Default

    So when do you get this new paddle wet?
    Pilot.



    Red is the New Yellow

  18. #18
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    Default Good question !

    Quote Originally Posted by Pilot View Post
    So when do you get this new paddle wet?
    Ah there's the rub - Making paddles is one thing I've not got anything to paddle- unless you count my daughters sit-on top, which may or may not be a good testing ground for paddles

    I've got the Peterborough all ready for assembly - ply cut, prebending the gunwales, holes drilled etc just waiting for the time and weather to co-incide
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  19. #19
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    Default Go For it

    I would encourage anyone to make their own paddles. It's not engineering and providing it allows you to move the canoe - that's all that it needs to do
    I appreciate blade shape,weight balance etc all play a part but if you never try making something you'll never have the opportunity to improve
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  20. #20
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    Nice looking paddles. Not seen the recess follow the outside edge on the handle before. (Not sure I'd get on with that but how does it feel to you?)

    TGB
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

  21. #21
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    So you're up a creek without a canoe. So I reckon, that should be next on the list.

    TGB
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

  22. #22
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    Default More pics as promised

    These are a few pics of the finished paddles. I have made pairs as I think it is just as easy to do two at a time as one, definately quicker than two individually anyhow.
    I reckon it took about 6-7 hrs to get them to a stage ready for Oiling, not including waiting for glue to dry
    I applied one coat of oil every evening for a week, leaving them in the utility room overnight to dry cos the boiler keeps the air nice & warm shame its too small to build a canoe in



    The perspective is a little out on this shot - the blades are not as tapered as they appear



    Similar shot to one above less flash bounce back



    Having not actually used these paddles yet I can only guess what they will react like in the water.
    The shaft on these being el cheapo broom handles ( see previous post )
    is quite flexy, possibly even whippy - easy Tiger
    I don't think I'd be happy taking the canoe out with just this paddle in case it snapped

    Paddle set number three to be posted soon.

    He who paddles last - paddles longest
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  23. #23

    Default

    Great idea with the cut panel pins preventing the wings from sliding during glue up...simple and effective. I've had a couple of laminated paddle attempts misalign while clamping that later needed some creative reshaping of the blade to retain symmetry. Ash and cedar make a stunning combo similar to ash and black cherry. Fantastic work!

    Regards,
    Murat
    paddlemaking.blogspot.com

  24. #24

    Default

    Another set of beauties. Love the sharp look of the spline contrasting with the darker blade. Looking forward to your next set...keep them coming!

    Murat
    Paddlemaking & Other Canoe Stuff - paddlemaking.blogspot.com/

  25. #25
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by TGB View Post
    Nice looking paddles. Not seen the recess follow the outside edge on the handle before. (Not sure I'd get on with that but how does it feel to you?)

    TGB
    Although I've not used the paddles yet I have sort ot worked around the fact that you rarely hold the paddle in one position for long periods of time therefore, providing the shape feels ok then it probably will be. As I get to use it I will feed back any observations.
    On the next set of paddles - yet to be posted - I have taken this a little further by reducing the thickness of the shaft immediatley below the grip and immediatley above the shaft / blade position which feels like an improvement, as yet untried though
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  26. #26
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    Default And the third set

    As promised the third set of paddles. My own remit for these was to make something 'cheap easy & quick' however the best laid plans...........
    The idea being that if anyone wanted to borrow the Peterborough they could take these paddles and if they got lost or damaged it would not matter (too much )

    This is the expoded view of the handle. 6mm birch ply between Utile side pieces and shaft



    This is all the component parts - the blades did sort of morph shape wise as the assembly progressed



    The rough shape of the blade



    The handle ready to cut shape.



    The blade end of the shaft shaped and slotted. I cut the slot on a table saw and the housed out a further 50mm or so for a little extra support.

    Apologies for the colour I forgot to reset the flash.



    The blade cut to 'slide' up the shaft



    An overview so far



    The blade in place



    This is a little jig I made to aid shaping the handle.




    Used in conjunction with a router and a bearing guided cutter like this it should make life easier




    However if the shaft is not held VERY firmly in the jig it can rattle about with devastating effect.


    .
    That'll be oops then
    Still I am a proffessional ( allegedly) so a little re-think and it goes like this




    Shaping the shaft the easy way





    HOWEVER if you don't heed your own advice this can happen...





    Double Opps then

    Assembly underway again








    Add a little Danish Oil and some time later....





    .

    A wise old joiner once said to me "Any fool can make a mistake - but it takes a good man to get over it"

    Humilty prevents me from saying that my wifes husband made a fair job of retrieving the handle devastation



    So here we are third set finished



    They took me way longer than I ever expected, Strangely enough the first set - Ash with Cedar were almost certainly the quickest to make.


    THE PADDLE COLLECTIVE





    .

    Thank you to all who have posted encouraging comments and those PM's I've received with regard to selling paddles, I am seriously thinking about it but not until the Peterborough is complete.
    Meanwhile if anyone feels inspired to attempt thier own paddles after reading this then my mission is accomplished

    GO FOR IT
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  27. #27
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    Default

    great work!

    i think the mistake with the router and jig was actually fortunate, because those grips look really nice with the light wood ends.

    It all started with a folding boat I built at school...

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhand View Post
    Some severe sanding and shaping (apologies for no pics - but sanding is pretty boring) about 10 coats of Danish Oil later and Voila
    Very nice work but I'd be interested to know a little more about how you do the shaping and with what tools.

    I have a half made Greenland kayak paddle in my garden shed. I have roughly shaped it using a draw knife but I now need to do some finer shaping before sanding and I am struggling. I find the draw knife tends to remove too much wood, especially working on the shaft. I bought a crook knife thinking the curve would help with the shaft but I have found it very hard to use.

  29. #29
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luke View Post
    Very nice work but I'd be interested to know a little more about how you do the shaping and with what tools.

    I have a half made Greenland kayak paddle in my garden shed. I have roughly shaped it using a draw knife but I now need to do some finer shaping before sanding and I am struggling. I find the draw knife tends to remove too much wood, especially working on the shaft. I bought a crook knife thinking the curve would help with the shaft but I have found it very hard to use.
    I think you are very brave using a Draw Knife, I have one and never even considered using it on the Paddle making projects

    My basic selection of tools for making the paddles seen here are as follows:
    Spokeshaves - Flat Base, curved base and the most useful one with an adjustable mouth.

    Plane - A Stanley 220 Block Plane I have used this plane for so many tasks over the years, it was one of the first tools I bought as an apprentice Joiner over 34 years ago it is so versatile.

    Surform - This one is a 'tubular' design about 16mm diameter 250,mm long.

    Files - Various, but mostly old and knackered metal working 2nd cut files.

    Glasspaper 80, 100,120 grit for final shaping also 400, 800 & 1200 grit for flatting between coats of Oil, oh and Cork faced sanding block for use with coarser grits, the finer grits I just use folded it gives a certain feedback about the finish underneath.

    POWER TOYS ( tools)

    Elu Router 1/2" collet and a selection of Cutters acquired over the years, principle ones being a 25mm radius cutter - for the Shaft & and a 12mm bearing guided follow cutter as seen on the blog above. this actually gets used to go around templates which is a way of getting consistant results in shaping, good if i ever get to make bespoke paddles to sell.

    Makita Power Plane - 85mm wide. For shooting off vast amounts of timber from the blade area in particular, very quickly.

    Belt Sander 75mm wide to consolidate what the Power planer has started.

    Makita Palm sander - This thing vibrates with a vengeance. so I always wear thick gloves. This is good for sanding once initial shape has been achieved - but it does leave little circlular scratches whinch are best removed by hand sanding with the line of the grain, otherwise they become very obvious as soon as it gets a coat of oil or lacquer
    It's all in the preparation, allegedly

    I hope that's been useful

    I find making Paddles a very theraputic exercise,
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  30. #30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luke View Post
    Very nice work but I'd be interested to know a little more about how you do the shaping and with what tools.

    I have a half made Greenland kayak paddle in my garden shed. I have roughly shaped it using a draw knife but I now need to do some finer shaping before sanding and I am struggling. I find the draw knife tends to remove too much wood, especially working on the shaft. I bought a crook knife thinking the curve would help with the shaft but I have found it very hard to use.
    Hi
    when you want to take fine shavings with a drawknife turn the drawknife blade over so tha the bevel is in contact with the wood and make sure it is as sharp as a razor, sharp blades tend not to cut you dull ones do

  31. #31
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    Default A spare Gauntlet !!

    I think I may have seen a gauntlet left laying around here somewhere - someone must have thrown it down
    So I Will pick it up and see if I can make a paddle using only a draw knife and maybe glasspaper - watch this space for those of you who want to know what one looks like



    I didn't know that I could do this with an image off Google image finder using cut & paste
    Last edited by Slowhand; 28th-March-2008 at 08:39 PM. Reason: included wrong quote
    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  32. #32

    Default

    Hi,
    Would you reccomend gorrila glue instead of epoxy???
    I have tubes full of GG, but can't find epoxy at any of my local hardware stores (odd huh?)

    Also, Does anyone know a good thread to help with choosing finishes for my latest paddle???
    (It is already oiled, need to pick a decent oil-based varnish or something.

  33. #33
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    Default

    Well done! I am learning to carve paddles mostly with a draw knife. It really helps to have a shave horse. It is very relaxing to work wood with hand tools you have less dust, noise and danger.
    Dr. Joe
    Electric Hospital
    Coos Bay Or
    http://electrichospital.com

  34. #34
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    Default Glue for you

    Quote Originally Posted by gmihir97 View Post
    Hi,
    Would you reccomend gorrila glue instead of epoxy???
    I have tubes full of GG, but can't find epoxy at any of my local hardware stores (odd huh?)

    Also, Does anyone know a good thread to help with choosing finishes for my latest paddle???
    (It is already oiled, need to pick a decent oil-based varnish or something.
    If you have already oiled the wood and you're not planning to use it to dig dirt then I would stop at that I have paddles which are coming on 4years old ans still look good, I am a bit anal about cleaning and drying after use and occasional re coat with danish oil

    As for glue I have only used Titebond PVA glue for all my paddles - I've had minimal experience with gg

    I hope this helps

    Better to do something and regret it - Than regret not doing anything

  35. #35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhand View Post

    If you have already oiled the wood and you're not planning to use it to dig dirt then I would stop at that I have paddles which are coming on 4years old ans still look good, I am a bit anal about cleaning and drying after use and occasional re coat with danish oil

    As for glue I have only used Titebond PVA glue for all my paddles - I've had minimal experience with gg

    I hope this helps

    I have oiled with linseed though, and I heard from some friends that it starts looking horrible after some time. Is this true?

  36. #36
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    Default

    Gorilla Glue is a brand, their original product was a waterproof polyurethane though now he range seems to include cyanoacrylates (super glue.)

    Assuming what you have is the polyurethane it should be fine for paddle making. It isn't gap filling but paddle making generally involves relatively large flat gluing areas.

    It does rely on the humidity of the wood for curing so there can be value in damping the faces to be glued slightly. Doing so seems to lead to better glue penetration. When I've used polyurethane glues on wood that was very dry the joints pretty easy to break later. Joints made where I wiped with a damp sponge first have stayed solid for years (gunwhales on a dinghy for example.) However, too much water seems to lead to a very frothy join, not weak, but with small air holes in the glue line that need filling before finishing. So just damped!

  37. #37

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Timoc View Post
    Gorilla Glue is a brand, their original product was a waterproof polyurethane though now he range seems to include cyanoacrylates (super glue.)

    Assuming what you have is the polyurethane it should be fine for paddle making. It isn't gap filling but paddle making generally involves relatively large flat gluing areas.

    It does rely on the humidity of the wood for curing so there can be value in damping the faces to be glued slightly. Doing so seems to lead to better glue penetration. When I've used polyurethane glues on wood that was very dry the joints pretty easy to break later. Joints made where I wiped with a damp sponge first have stayed solid for years (gunwhales on a dinghy for example.) However, too much water seems to lead to a very frothy join, not weak, but with small air holes in the glue line that need filling before finishing. So just damped!
    I can't tell if it is the polyurethane. It just says Gorrilla Wood Glue.
    Under that, it says: indoor/outdoor use, type 2 water resistance

    Is this the right product? If not, I will return it and hunt for the polyurethane.

    Thanks.

  38. #38
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    Default

    Sounds like the polyurethane. If it's a brown gloop rather than a thin clear liquid it's even more certain. If it then sets with a foaming action it definitely is!

  39. #39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Timoc View Post
    Sounds like the polyurethane. If it's a brown gloop rather than a thin clear liquid it's even more certain. If it then sets with a foaming action it definitely is!
    Thanks Timoc
    I guess ill just cross my fingers and hope for the best.

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