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Thread: Non-disposable BBQ

  1. #1
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    Default Non-disposable BBQ

    I notice that there are some people using disposable BBQ's, I used to use them a lot when camping because the bbq's you can buy tend to be bulky, dirty, and cheaply made. However I quickly realised that disposables were a) rubbish, not enough charcoal, grill too close to food and b) expensive if you use them a lot. c) not very eco friendly, you end up throwing most of what you have paid for in the bin. So I made my own bbq that suited my needs. Just buy a large, rectangular, stainless caterers baking tin, the type you might use to roast a turkey in (around 14 x 8 x 3 inches). Makro do one for under _ tenner that has a stainless steel grill that fits in the bottom, this can be turned sdeways across the top as your grill platform. Get some holes drilled in the side of the tin for vents. Buy a bag of charcoal. So tin plus coal is around 15 queen quids. That will do you for at least ten bbq's. Then just keep buying charcoal. Ten disposables at 3 queen sheets each????? Well you've probably done the math by now! Highly portable, fairly light, eco friendly and works much, much better than a disposable.
    Mahalo!

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    Quote Originally Posted by junglegusset View Post
    I notice that there are some people using disposable BBQ's, I used to use them a lot when camping because the bbq's you can buy tend to be bulky, dirty, and cheaply made. However I quickly realised that disposables were a) rubbish, not enough charcoal, grill too close to food and b) expensive if you use them a lot. c) not very eco friendly, you end up throwing most of what you have paid for in the bin. So I made my own bbq that suited my needs. Just buy a large, rectangular, stainless caterers baking tin, the type you might use to roast a turkey in (around 14 x 8 x 3 inches). Makro do one for under _ tenner that has a stainless steel grill that fits in the bottom, this can be turned sdeways across the top as your grill platform. Get some holes drilled in the side of the tin for vents. Buy a bag of charcoal. So tin plus coal is around 15 queen quids. That will do you for at least ten bbq's. Then just keep buying charcoal. Ten disposables at 3 queen sheets each????? Well you've probably done the math by now! Highly portable, fairly light, eco friendly and works much, much better than a disposable.
    How many times have you used it so far? I ask because I expect the metal tin would burn through rather quickly.

    It all started with a folding boat I built at school...

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    I've not made this one yet, just waiting for the last few christmas choccies to be eaten by the kids!

    Another simple way to make a portable bbq, Get a leftover Roses/Quality Street family tin. Drill 3-4 holes in the base, depending on whether it's a round one or the hexagon shape, near to the edge and put 3-4 bolts through. Use 2 nuts per bolt so the bolt head sits on the floor, 1 nut to the outside of the tin and then 1 on the inside. Tighten these 2 against each other and that will give you a stable leg. Drill a few small holes around the sides and base to allow air to flow. Pour in your charcoal, or use pieces of wood and light it up. You can use an old piece of grill from a used disposable bbq.

    The beauty is you can fill it up with charcoal before you leave home (put it in a paper bag so it doesn't fall through the holes, fit the lid and it's all self contained.
    Not quite boatless anymore!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobgoblin View Post
    How many times have you used it so far? I ask because I expect the metal tin would burn through rather quickly.

    I used it all last summer, probably around 15 to 20 times, and with heat beads which get hotter than normal charcoal. Apart from the inevitable colour change its showing no signs of wear. It's fairly thick stainless steel, can't see it burning through in a hurry, if at all. Even if it burnt out next week (which it won't) it will still have paid for itself twice over in didposable barbeque terms.
    Mahalo!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobgoblin View Post
    How many times have you used it so far? I ask because I expect the metal tin would burn through rather quickly.

    I dont want to sound like a wikipedia-know-it-all, but........... I've just looked up the burning temp of charcoal, it's around 2000 F and that's with air being blown at it i.e blasting. The melting point of Stainless Steel is around 2500F .

    I'll try and get some pics tomorrow so people can see the type of thing I used.
    Mahalo!

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    isnt it oxidisation rather than melting which eats metal in fires?

    It should be fine, definitely better than the disposable ones

    If you bought another cheap cooking tray, a reasonably shallow one, turned it over and bashed it with a hammer to make a dish on the bottom (not so deep it touches the floor) then poked some holes in it it would raise the fire off the SS steel and allow better ventilation to the coals. I use up old trays this way for summer bbqs and my el cheapo bbq still has the original paint on the bottom after 3 yrs of heavy usage.

    Im sure no one here would, but dont put the thing down on grass, there is nothing more ugly than comming across a perfectly rectangular patch of scorched grass.

    Some pictures would be nice - Ive been saving old computer cases to make a portable BBQ so its nice to share ideas.
    It all started with a folding boat I built at school...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobgoblin View Post
    isnt it oxidisation rather than melting which eats metal in fires?

    It should be fine, definitely better than the disposable ones

    If you bought another cheap cooking tray, a reasonably shallow one, turned it over and bashed it with a hammer to make a dish on the bottom (not so deep it touches the floor) then poked some holes in it it would raise the fire off the SS steel and allow better ventilation to the coals. I use up old trays this way for summer bbqs and my el cheapo bbq still has the original paint on the bottom after 3 yrs of heavy usage.


    Some pictures would be nice - Ive been saving old computer cases to make a portable BBQ so its nice to share ideas.
    Hmmm, not sure oxidation will be a problem, it's stainless. Doesn't really show any signs of damage as I say. I realise that extreme heat can alter the properties of alloys though, I wouldn't want to leave it in the rain now after all that heating.

    The tray in the bottom to raise the charcoal is a great idea. Will try that. I'll try for some pics tomorrow.
    Mahalo!

  8. #8
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    I've moved these posts to their own thread as they would get lost in the Recipies thread and also merited it.

    I use disposables both at home and when away camping or in the big boat as they require no cleaning or tidying up. They are also a lot cheaper than purpouse built bbq's. I like the idea of your baking tray, I'll need to have a look at that.

    As for the disposables, there are good ones and poor ones. To be honest the best ones I have found are the Bar Be quick (not sur of the spelling) or as I do any that I can buy in the late autumn in the supermarkets when they sell them off for 50p a time, brilliant value. I think we probably use about 10 - 15 bbq's a year so this works out very cheap for us.
    Chris


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    I use disposables when camping because disposables do what they say on the tin. You still have to carry a dirty roasting tin and grill round with you when the bbq is over.
    Regards Retro


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    Quote Originally Posted by retro View Post
    You still have to carry a dirty roasting tin and grill round with you when the bbq is over.
    Regards Retro
    Just rinse it and wash it. I wash mine and scrub it with grass to get any fat stains off it, of course this requires more effort than simply disposing of it. I don't like carrying dirty bbq's around in any vehicle, canoe or car or anything else. I urge you to free yourself from your disposable lifestyle! You'll feel better for it! Trust me. Seriously though, if that works for you then great. If you were doing an extended (or even a few day) wilderness camping trip though you might struggle to find a bin.

    I met an Australian last year. He was on his first visit outside of Oz and he said that he had never seen a disposable bbq till he came to the UK and was amazed with them. I'm not sure what the moral of this little story is but at the time I was having big ideas about being Australias sole importer of disposable bbq's! Talk about selling snow to Eskimo's! One of you will probably do it now and make a fortune. Its okay, pay me later.

    Chrish, nice one for re-threading this, didn't realise it was such a 'hot' topic and yeah I/we were wandering a tad off-topic .
    Mahalo!

  11. #11
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    Red face not quite a BBQ but.....

    Ok I know that it's not quite a BBQ but I came across an old stainless steel culander and an idea sprang to mind... a fire "pot" I found the dogs water bowl fitted perfik as a base when turned upside down. Out came the drill and popped a hole in the base of Ozzys bowl now I can attach them together with a bolt and a wing nut. Ok it does look like a culander bolted to a dog bowl but using an old base from a camp kitchen as the grill I can (after burning the paint off) cook with it. As to burning the grass I field tested it in my back garden for several hours with charcoal and the grass was untouched! All in all it only cost me a few quid don't worry about the dog he had a spare bowl.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  12. #12
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    Default Piccies

    Here are some pics:









    Mahalo!

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    Default Protecting the ground

    The problem of burning the ground and the things that dwell there. If you have no option but to bbq on top of vegetation then often a selection of carefully chosen rocks can do the trick. Rock is a plentiful, naturally occuring substance that can often be found near rivers and the ground. It comes in apparently random and sometimes highly amusing shapes and sizes (whoa! look how big that one is! And it's shape almost exactly like an iPod! ).

    It is usually free, unless you go to B and Q for yours and pay 6.00 for a 1kg lump of fairly standard limestone

    It has relatively poor heat conducting properties.

    I am considering thinking about planning at looking at getting some thermal safety matting of the type familiar to anyone who had the sense to turn up to high school science lessons. I will report back on this as and when.
    Mahalo!

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    you could of course, buy another stainless steel tray and store it nested inside the one you have, if you drilled holes in different places in it, you could alternate which one you used each time, one as the barbie, and the other, upside down as its stand. it wouldnt take up any more space than you already use, and it would lift the bbq off the ground. a few small nuts and bolts in one of the trays would make the small gap between the two trays that would allow air to circulate between them.
    sod work, im off for a paddle.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by junglegusset View Post
    The problem of burning the ground and the things that dwell there. If you have no option but to bbq on top of vegetation then often a selection of carefully chosen rocks can do the trick. Rock is a plentiful, naturally occuring substance that can often be found near rivers and the ground. It comes in apparently random and sometimes highly amusing shapes and sizes (whoa! look how big that one is! And it's shape almost exactly like an iPod! ).

    It is usually free, unless you go to B and Q for yours and pay 6.00 for a 1kg lump of fairly standard limestone

    It has relatively poor heat conducting properties.

    I am considering thinking about planning at looking at getting some thermal safety matting of the type familiar to anyone who had the sense to turn up to high school science lessons. I will report back on this as and when.
    you junglegusset, are Too Cool for School ! i applaud you.

  16. #16
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    An idea for the fireproof matting to protect the ground are the heat protecting mat from the plumbing section at B&Q, Wickes etc. Very cheap and light...
    ------------------
    Life is not a rehearsal so no 'I wish I'd...'

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    Default bbq food for thought

    in the disposable/ non disposable debate. i think your idea and design merits i give it a go this year. as a user of typically a dozen disposables a year and never having been impressed with the performance of any i have tried ,i conclude this is a go!! thanks w
    "Every action of our lives touches on
    some chord that will vibrate in eternity"

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    Quote Originally Posted by toptox View Post
    An idea for the fireproof matting to protect the ground are the heat protecting mat from the plumbing section at B&Q, Wickes etc. Very cheap and light...
    nahhh, buy a domestic fire blanket and make half a dozen!!!!
    sod work, im off for a paddle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lunar View Post
    you junglegusset, are Too Cool for School ! i applaud you.
    Lookin' pretty damn fine yourself there lunar!
    Mahalo!

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnr View Post
    nahhh, buy a domestic fire blanket and make half a dozen!!!!
    That's a great idea but it's knocking the price up, and even I, at the zeitgeist of my bbq career never managed to use six 'units' at once. I suppose you can cut a bit off and use the rest as, er, well.....a fire blanket! I'm sure there is someone on here who is fire blanket mad and (probably correctly) reckeons they can be used for all sorts, is that you?
    Mahalo!

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    Quote Originally Posted by junglegusset View Post
    That's a great idea but it's knocking the price up, and even I, at the zeitgeist of my bbq career never managed to use six 'units' at once. I suppose you can cut a bit off and use the rest as, er, well.....a fire blanket! I'm sure there is someone on here who is fire blanket mad and (probably correctly) reckeons they can be used for all sorts, is that you?

    then offset the cost by selling the other 5 at cost to others on here, in fact, pm me your address, and i'll send you an old asbestos free fire blanket, we throw them out at work.
    sod work, im off for a paddle.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnr View Post
    then offset the cost by selling the other 5 at cost to others on here, in fact, pm me your address, and i'll send you an old asbestos free fire blanket, we throw them out at work.
    Thanks john, nice one, I'll take you up on that.
    Mahalo!

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    there is a portable BBQ which folds to the size of a large pen, its called a grilliput, they are amazing not bad at about 20 with a firebowl, good things I use it for biking trips, but there not huge so 4 burgers is a limit

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmatt View Post
    there is a portable BBQ which folds to the size of a large pen, its called a grilliput, they are amazing not bad at about 20 with a firebowl, good things I use it for biking trips, but there not huge so 4 burgers is a limit
    As you said, they are small, and no way you could put a heavy(ish) pan on one

    These look OK (no connection to seller)
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/STAINLESS-STEE...QQcmdZViewItem
    All the best,
    Richard
    Retired bushcrafter now happy camper

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    I've been using this for the last month or so as a firebox:



    So far I'm very impressed. Because you can get pans underneath you can bake stuff, and it's a big enough size to get a decent fire going and lots of pans on, and it's sturdy too. It folds flat too (it's the briefcase one):



    24.95 from http://www.iwantoneofthose.com
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  26. #26

    Thumbs down Feedback on Grilliput:

    I bought a Grilliput a couple of weeks ago and ended up really regretting it. See below for a review of my experience that was previusly posted on the SOTP forum


    I ordered a Grilliput and Firebowl from I Want One of Those (IWOOT) on Tuesday afternoon http://www.iwantoneofthose.com/searc...liput&x=11&y=8

    The order arrived the following morning (incredible turnaround as I live in Northern Ireland). The pleasant surprise was short-lived: I unpacked the Grilliput and found a stainless steel screw cap detached from the main tube of the assembly. No amount of trying could get the screw cap to fit: it was not damaged but was simply too small for the tube it was supposed to fit. A very poorly-engineered piece of kit

    On assembling the Grilliput, a fiddly but quite simple operation I was left with what appeared to be a rather flimsy array of metal rods on a reasonably sturdy metal frame. The rods bowed, flexed and shifted when subjected to the slightest pressure. Not good and I certainly had the impression it would not support more than a few sausages or burgers. The product was disassembled for return to the supplier.

    My experience with the Firebowl was equally disappointing. The apparatus was flimsy and shoddily asembled. The unit showed signs of damage although the product box was undamaged. On opening and closing the leaves once, one of the flimsy metal leaves broke off. Needless to say it was packed up for return.

    Verdict: The Grilliput is an expensive piece of kit for being a simple but clever array of thin stainless steel rods and two tubes that pack nicely into one tube. The Grilliput is on the heavy side but when assembled it would double up as a priest for dispatching fish before grilling. However, the assembled product is rather flimsy and would not bear any substantial weight. The product I received was faulty and I understand that other users have highlighted potential problems with the screw on cap. This component is vital for retaining the metal rods in the tube for storage and transport. A Mark II version with better engineering of components and heavier guage grill rods may be more successfull.

    The Firebowl was simply a piece of flimsy, shoddy workmanship that I doubt would last too many real uses in the field even if it had arrived undamaged.

    The manufacturer of these items would appear to have issues with quality assurance and should be hauled over the coals for the poor quality of the products.
    The good news is that the supplier IWOOT refunded the cost of the purchase in full and appeared to have a good customer service dept. Pity about the product though.

    I ended up buying a cheapish BBQ bucket in Tesco (about one fifth of the the price for a Grilliput and Firebowl and a lot sturdier). The bucket is bulkier but is pretty versatile, with the ability to use components (e.g. grill rack, fire bucket and handly little BBQ tongs) separately and even with all compnents being carried there is enough space for packing cookings odds and ends. Not one for backpacking due to bulk but I imagine it would be fine for transporting by canoe.

    I believe Morrsions and ASDA sell the same or similar products cheaper at 6.00 and 5.00 respectively, howver I don't live near either outlet.
    Last edited by Esox; 6th-June-2008 at 11:14 AM. Reason: updating information on Tesco BBQ bucket.

  27. #27
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    This is what I use instead of disposables now.

    http://www.towsure.com/product/14895...rcoal_Barbecue



    Another cheaper alternative is http://www.east-coast-leisure.co.uk/...?Prodcode=3621



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