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Thread: NW Canada Gaelic Film - Tonight

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    Default NW Canada Gaelic Film - Tonight

    May have some 'Voyageur' type film. Think only BBC Scotland beeb 2.

    Ãompaireachd nan Gaidheal

    Thu 3 Jan, 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm 60mins
    They were the sons and grandsons of men who had fought in Culloden. They were a far cry from the wretched of the earth of later Highland clearance. Their ruthless vision, Mafia-like instincts and the muscles of their canoe brigades made them millionaire lords of the lakes and forests. Their achievements contributed in large measure to the shaping of modern Canada. They were the men of the North West Company and the story of their short-lived but incredibly successful wilderness empire and their struggle with the Hudson's Bay Company for fur-trade supremacy is told in this illuminating documentary account of a little-known area of Highland history.

    Nick

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    Sounds great - I wish it would show here. We have a number of NWCo forts close by. An ancestor of mine (Joseph Girard) is listed as an interpreter at a nearby fort in 1805.

    Went snowshoeing with a Buchanan lass the other day. Her ancestors were in the NWCo.

    PG
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

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    It maybe on the BBC player for seven days later on tomorrow.

    Nick

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    Thanks for the information, SCR - just watched it and really enjoyed it, despite the sub-titles.

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    It is a Gaelic TV programme so hence the subtitles, one way of preserving my nations native tongue and unique culture.

    Cool origin of the 'wigwam' word and cool canoes. Some big rapids for those 'York' boats to go down.

    Doesn't seem to be available on the BBC Web player.

    Candian Help Pease
    I have a great Uncle who's second name is Cree, presume he is of The 'Cree Native' descent ??

    Nick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scots_Charles_River View Post
    May have some 'Voyageur' type film. Think only BBC Scotland beeb 2.

    Ãompaireachd nan Gaidheal

    Thu 3 Jan, 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm 60mins
    They were the sons and grandsons of men who had fought in Culloden. They were a far cry from the wretched of the earth of later Highland clearance. Their ruthless vision, Mafia-like instincts and the muscles of their canoe brigades made them millionaire lords of the lakes and forests. Their achievements contributed in large measure to the shaping of modern Canada. They were the men of the North West Company and the story of their short-lived but incredibly successful wilderness empire and their struggle with the Hudson's Bay Company for fur-trade supremacy is told in this illuminating documentary account of a little-known area of Highland history.

    Nick
    Is that film about a combination of "Voyeur" and "Voyager" ?

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    Did anybody tape it?

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    OOps should have DVDed it.

    Nick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Pad View Post
    Is that film about a combination of "Voyeur" and "Voyager" ?
    No, A coureur des bois was an individual who engaged in the fur trade without permission from the French authorities. The coureurs des bois operated during the late 17th century and early 18th century in eastern North America. The term literally means "runner of the woods". Later, a limited number of permits were issued to coureurs des bois who became known as voyageurs.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Scots_Charles_River View Post


    Candian Help Pease
    I have a great Uncle who's second name is Cree, presume he is of The 'Cree Native' descent ??

    Nick
    Well I'm not a "Candian," but it is possible. Seems like an odd name to carry around otherwise.

    Ask him, "Gee Yee mindiquay mukada, muskeki waboo ina"? If he says, "With cream and sugar, please." - Chances are...
    The perfect canoe -
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scots_Charles_River View Post
    No, A coureur des bois was an individual who engaged in the fur trade without permission from the French authorities. The coureurs des bois operated during the late 17th century and early 18th century in eastern North America. The term literally means "runner of the woods". Later, a limited number of permits were issued to coureurs des bois who became known as voyageurs.

    Uh, that's not quite right either. The Voyageurs were the engages, usually French or Native. The permit was issued to the bourgeoise, under the French regime, though often the permit holder would sell or rent out the permit.

    Under the British regime, the bourgeoise was often Scottish or English, though there were a few who were French, and sometimes American (such as Peter Pond). The Voyageurs were still French or Native.

    The Hudson's Bay Company employed Orkneymen, though these were never Voyageurs in the true sense of the word.

    The NWCo hierarchy went something like this:

    Partner - Scots or English
    Bourgeoisie - Scots or English
    Clerk - Scots or English
    Interpreter - French or Native
    Avant - French or Native
    Governai - French or Native
    Milliu - French or Native

    The last four groups were considered to be Engages. Among them there was one other important hierarchy, that of Mangers du Lard (Porkeaters) and Hivernaunts (Winterers). The Porkeaterss propelled the canoe between Montreal and the Grand Portage. The Winterers "wintered over" beyond the Grand Portage. Besides propelling the canoe, the Winterers were sometimes entrusted with trade goods and spent the winter living with and trading with bands of Natives, returning to the post with furs in the spring.
    Last edited by pierre girard; 5th-January-2008 at 01:24 AM.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

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    Lloyd

    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...


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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard View Post
    Uh, that's not quite right either. The Voyageurs were the engages, usually French or Native. The permit was issued to the bourgeoise, under the French regime, though often the permit holder would sell or rent out the permit.

    Under the British regime, the bourgeoise was often Scottish or English, though there were a few who were French, and sometimes American (such as Peter Pond). The Voyageurs were still French or Native.

    The Hudson's Bay Company employed Orkneymen, though these were never Voyageurs in the true sense of the word.
    Sorry, just quoted it from Wikipedia.

    What you say is what the programme said althoguh the Battle of Seven Oaks had highlander against highlander.

    Just been reading about the Pemmican war too, amazing stuff.

    Used as an Army Ration in African Wars
    In Africa, biltong was commonly used in all of its forms, but during the Second Boer War (1899-1902), British troops were given an iron ration made of four ounces of pemmican and four ounces of chocolate and sugar. The pemmican would keep in perfect condition for decades, even in sacks worn smooth by transportation, and thus it was considered much superior to biltong. This iron ration was prepared in two small tins (soldered together) which were fastened inside the soldiers' belts. It was the last ration pulled and it was pulled only when ordered by the commanding officer. On this a man could march thirty-six hours before he began to drop from hunger. The British Army Chief of Scouts, the American Frederick Russell Burnham, made pemmican a mandatory item carried by every scout.[3][4]

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhyAyeMan View Post
    Interesting stuff.

    My name is Norse but there is a village of people all with the same surname as mine in the Trentino area of the Dolomites, Italy.

    Nick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scots_Charles_River View Post
    What you say is what the programme said althoguh the Battle of Seven Oaks had highlander against highlander.
    Now we are talking about Selkirk, that SOB! I wish he'd never been born.

    It's not quite correct to say it was Highlander against Haighlander. The battle of Seven Oaks was Metis against Highlander. Some of the Metis had Scots names. A friend Of mine from Two Harbors, MN, Robert Cummings (a descendant of the "Black" Cummings circa the time of Robert the Bruce), had a Metis ancestor who was involved in the Battle of Seven Oaks (also known as the Seven Oaks Massacre). Cummings is also descended from Gabriel Dumont, Louis Riel's General during the Riel Rebellion. Robert Cummings is Metis, being more than half Cree.
    The perfect canoe -
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    I used to like history
    Lloyd

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    Just found this, looks like a lot of books for free. Great for reading on the PDA, dark nights camping.

    Here is a Voyageur one

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=u...KKZcw#PPP11,M1

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