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Thread: Living full time in a community of Tentipis

  1. #1
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    Default Living full time in a community of Tentipis

    I'm new to the site,but I live in a community of Tentipis, with a mixture of the actual Tentipis and the Helsport Lavvus. We have had some heavy Gales recently, and both models held up fine, but we did have to add extra guy ropes to the Helsports, and put rivets on the snow skirts to stop lift. Once done, they performed as well as the more expensive models. They are slightly taller and thinner, and the tentipi is apparently the exact ratio that battens down in a high wind, so they feel very stable. Also we replaced the centre poles with small trees, as we heard of a chap on Skye who's pole snapped in a gale! The difference is remarkable as even in a storm, the hurricane lamps attached to it are still, whilst the aluminium poles sway about, and everything goes flying.
    We have found the best model of Tentipi to be the simple Arran, as you can fasten the top opening tight, whereas the more expensive Varrie's smoke hole cover can lift. Also in favour of Tentipi is the colour: The green Helsports are dark inside.
    We also have a mixture of expensive tentipi stoves and the new much cheaper ones from MadBear Outdoors, which we are thrilled with. Hundreds of pounds cheaper, and you can cook on them.
    Look forward to chatting,
    Sara

  2. #2
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    Wow - someone who LIVES in a Tentipi ! How does that work - is it a permanent arrangement ? How fascinating ! Sounds like a wonderful way to live
    PWC
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  3. #3
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    Talking

    Hi, yes, it's pretty good.I keep a journal, and it's interesting to see how we start tuning in to the weather, and what time it is. We don't have mobiles, but I can log on at work to see what's happening in the world. (The shipping forecast is the most important piece of outside contact for us). We currently rent a field on a farm, and have to move two or three times a year, but it's a rural area, and landowners seem glad of the rent. We are all in land management, (except me who runs a cafe), and so we leave the land in good order. We ask at building sites if they would like us to remove their off cuts, as it saves their skip fees,and so far we have amassed tons of wood this way.Apart from not having or wanting much in the way of possesions, it's a pretty normal life. I cook Sunday roasts in a Dutch oven, and we usually have fresh fish. (Will sort out photos.) Last Sunday a pigeon crashed into a tree, and it was plucked and in the pot before it knew it was dead.
    We live as close to nature as possible, and have a structure to the community to resolve any conflicts, and to admit new members.
    One of the main changes in outlook for all of us has been that we really celebrate the changing seasons, and pull together to mark key events, like the solstices and equinoxes.
    I think we all really enjoy this way of living, as we have a strong sense of community, good shelter, warmth and food we have worked hard to provide, and NO TELLY. Far from roughing it, we're SMOOTHING it!
    Caspar Odqvist has designed a new Lavvu which we will be road testing, as I am convinced that nowhere in Britain, even the Isle of Skye, is as windy!!

    Pierre, I love the photo. I am the one with the pipe!

    Sara

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    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    Hi, yes, it's pretty good.I keep a journal, and it's interesting to see how we start tuning in to the weather, and what time it is. We don't have mobiles, but I can log on at work to see what's happening in the world. (The shipping forecast is the most important piece of outside contact for us). We currently rent a field on a farm, and have to move two or three times a year, but it's a rural area, and landowners seem glad of the rent. We are all in land management, (except me who runs a cafe), and so we leave the land in good order. We ask at building sites if they would like us to remove their off cuts, as it saves their skip fees,and so far we have amassed tons of wood this way.Apart from not having or wanting much in the way of possesions, it's a pretty normal life. I cook Sunday roasts in a Dutch oven, and we usually have fresh fish. (Will sort out photos.) Last Sunday a pigeon crashed into a tree, and it was plucked and in the pot before it knew it was dead.
    We live as close to nature as possible, and have a structure to the community to resolve any conflicts, and to admit new members.
    One of the main changes in outlook for all of us has been that we really celebrate the changing seasons, and pull together to mark key events, like the solstices and equinoxes.
    I think we all really enjoy this way of living, as we have a strong sense of community, good shelter, warmth and food we have worked hard to provide, and NO TELLY. Far from roughing it, we're SMOOTHING it!
    Caspar Odqvist has designed a new Lavvu which we will be road testing, as I am convinced that nowhere in Britain, even the Isle of Skye, is as windy!!

    Pierre, I love the photo. I am the one with the pipe!

    Sara
    Saami are interesting people. Some of the kids I grew up with, Ylitalas (means hill) , were Soumalina Saami. Whole family looked liked Santa's elves.
    The perfect canoe -
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    I think we all really enjoy this way of living, as we have a strong sense of community, good shelter, warmth and food we have worked hard to provide, and NO TELLY. Far from roughing it, we're SMOOTHING it!


    Sara
    So what do you use for transport ?? or are you just living in tents.

    I find this interesting but it seems someone elses thread has been hijacked ??
    Originally it was in Introductions ??? but seems to have drifted out of it.

    MickT
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    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

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    Question

    Sorry Mick, should I go back to the 'Intros'? Don't understand forum etiquette, and thought it was more appropriate to be here.
    We have vehicles to get to and from work, which are parked at the nearby farm, and then we walk onto the site. Last night was beautiful and still. Woke up to heavy rain, which is what I like best, as you can only stoke up the stove and stay in. However, as I was due in at work, I had to break the peace for a mad dash across the fields and back to the rat race.

    Someone from this forum came into my cafe yesterday! How cool is that!

    Sara

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    Quote Originally Posted by bothyman View Post
    I find this interesting but it seems someone elses thread has been hijacked ??
    Perhaps you should start a new thread ("Living full time in a community of Tentipis") and one of the moderators could transfer relevant posts there.

    I am interested in the 1001 details of life like this. How/where do you get your internet access? etc and photos

    This certainly justifies a thread of its own.
    Keith

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    And as if by magic
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly View Post
    And as if by magic
    Thanks MK
    Keith

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    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post

    We have vehicles to get to and from work, which are parked at the nearby farm, and then we walk onto the site.

    Someone from this forum came into my cafe yesterday! How cool is that!

    Sara
    I thought you would have been using reindeer ??? but I suppose Santa has all those booked up??


    Whatever you do don't offer them a discount

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    and NO TELLY. Sara
    I bet you still get those annoying letters reminding you that you don't have a TV license.
    Aslan




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    Quote Originally Posted by aslan View Post
    I bet you still get those annoying letters reminding you that you don't have a TV license.

    how? addressed to second tentipi along from the left, in a field, next to a farm, !!! just move the tent across and send it back as address unknown!!

    sounds an idylic lifestyle tho!!!
    sod work, im off for a paddle.

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    Well this is fun, to have a thread. Watch this space as we all fly off over the cliffs (Severe Gale's forecast tonight!) Internet access is at work, so I log on 5 days a week. At the moment we all have houses, but the plan is to all sell up in the next 18 months and buy land together.Until then,we are watching other communities and how they get on with planning permission, and seeing how we get on living together. My adult children live in our house, as do another couples...normally the kids move out,but......
    Had a bit of a nerve racking day today when the wind blew so hard that two guy ropes snapped and the centre pole went off centre and the whole tent veered over. It was like a galleon listing. We could hardly push it back up due to the wind's force. So now there is para cord doubling up on all the guy ropes and boulders pinning the skirt down. How different they look to the catalogue pictures of happy bushcraftmen making coffee and admiring the view!
    Will let you know how the Lavvus fared over the weekend: there is Force 11 coming in in the next sea area. This has got to be the ultimate test-drive.
    Caspar Odqvist has designed a Lavvu which I am going to try out over the Winter. The Helsport Tundras have had to have quite a bit of extra support added, but that was easy and cheap, and they are holding up as well as the heavier Tentipis. Even a light Tinde3 is sitting pretty.
    See you Monday,
    Sara

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    Good luck for the weekend!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    I'm new to the site,but I live in a community of Tentipis, with a mixture of the actual Tentipis and the Helsport Lavvus. We have had some heavy Gales recently, and both models held up fine, but we did have to add extra guy ropes to the Helsports, and put rivets on the snow skirts to stop lift. Once done, they performed as well as the more expensive models. They are slightly taller and thinner, and the tentipi is apparently the exact ratio that battens down in a high wind, so they feel very stable. Also we replaced the centre poles with small trees, as we heard of a chap on Skye who's pole snapped in a gale! The difference is remarkable as even in a storm, the hurricane lamps attached to it are still, whilst the aluminium poles sway about, and everything goes flying.
    We have found the best model of Tentipi to be the simple Arran, as you can fasten the top opening tight, whereas the more expensive Varrie's smoke hole cover can lift. Also in favour of Tentipi is the colour: The green Helsports are dark inside.
    We also have a mixture of expensive tentipi stoves and the new much cheaper ones from MadBear Outdoors, which we are thrilled with. Hundreds of pounds cheaper, and you can cook on them.
    Look forward to chatting,
    Sara




    Hi sara ,im so happy to make your (albeit cyber)acquaintance...and im not going to drivel on too long about how jealous of your nomadic lifestyle i am, i wish i was in a position to be "in your position"-but then maybe when the kids *ahem* leave home or are of age ,maybe then we can think about it-but for now there is no way Mrs me is going to convert-(joke), id love too -tomorrow ,only, work is a major part of my (37 yr old) life at the moment and its just not viable but that is definately in my mind.

    The main reason for my post is to thank you for raising the issue of which tipi is best.I have had a request for such info on many forums of late & you have almost single handedly made up my mind..
    http://www.trekoverland.com/arran_tipi.htm
    ... is this yours ??? and which stove DO you have.

    Im off to here next year ( but maybe not with these outfitters)...

    http://www.naturetravels.co.uk/categ...FQltMAodtRpCXA


    ...and although im happy to bivi/basha it, im gonna be looking at the aforementioned tipi soon-get it while i can afford it type scenario,something that is easy enough to put up-unlike these n 3 compartment jobbies that we have at the moment that take best part of an hour to erect & secure ... Im assuming that the (your) Arran is of superior quality fabric (waterproof etc) ,as i see the ripstop tipi's advertised but then can they take the beating yours has endured ???.. God bless & thanks -hope the storm dint blow you away. Lee
    The purpose of life is to live a life of purpose...

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    Sara:

    Something I though you might be interested in. I have some friends who've built a waganogan, which is a teepee shaped Ojibwe dwelling. This one is 20 some feet across and they use it for several months every autumn for hunting camp. The poles are quite substantial. The lower part of the dwelling is covered with cedar bark and insulated with six to eight inches of cat-tails. The upper part is covered with birch-bark. It is a very livable dwelling.

    The most ingenious part of the dwelling is the hearth - which has two drafts, dug underground - which causes the fire to draw (most don't - believe me). This keeps you from having the sensation that you're living in a chimney.

    They just moved out last weekend with the close of muzzleloader deer season, though they will be using it some weekends through the winter.

    I know I have photos somewhere. I'll try to resurrect a couple.
    The perfect canoe -
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  17. #17
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    Best thread on the forum at the moment. Really fascinating !
    PWC
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    Know less, carry more - you're in a canoe !

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    Default Saami

    An Interesting Video on You Tube about the Saami.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0Bzj...eature=related

    This is the First of 6 parts very interesting

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

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    Sounds familiar. We had woodland caribou here until 1918. My grandfather used to love the coming of the caribou. It was a large herd and would range from upper Ontario down into Minnesota. After 1918 they never came again. There have been many reasons given for their disappearance here. My grandfather says there was a blight of the reindeer moss that year and that's why they never came back.

    In the late 1990s there was a plan to re-introduce them into NE Minnesota. In 1999 there was a huge storm in NE Minnesota, known as the "blow-down." In a large swath of the area where they'd hoped to re-introduce the caribou much of the old growth timber was knocked down. Without the old growth forest - reintroduction of the caribou was impractical.
    The perfect canoe -
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    Mickey, thanks for posting the video. It's lovely to hear the Yoiking: we also sing those songs. Very much of the spirit of the land.
    Lee, Yes, my own lavvu is the Arran. It has sufficed just as well as the more expensive Varrie, and less to go wrong:although if you were in snow, the ripstop snowskirt of the Varrie would stop the wicking effect. You would be able to put stones around the inside without getting puddles of water. I live with the puddles, as they don't take away from the comfort. Although I waterproof each season, I think there is still a saturation point on the canvas, and it's important not to touch the sides when it's raining. The ripstop is obviously waterproof, but it doesn't have the weight behind it in the wind, and it doesn't batten down as hard. So I will go for the Tentipi every time.
    My stove is the Tentipi one, which I can't fault. Had it 4 years, and it boils a kettle or small pan. It has a substantial chimney which doesn't rock about in the wind, and it can be emptied from the bottom. It is made from stainless steel, and when it's really hot it glows, which is such a lovely sight on a wintry night. I have seen other tipi stoves, but the ONLY one which is any good is the one Oli MadBear is selling, because you can cook on it, and also inside it, and empty it in situ.
    Pierre, I would love to see photos of this Ojibwe dwelling.It sounds perfect.

    Well we didn't weather the storm too well last night. So we can say that the Tentipis can go up to Gale force 8 okay,but after that, there was some damage. Mostly pegs coming out because of the ground getting saturated, and then the wind getting underneath, and knocking the centre poles off, which brings the Lavvu down like a sinking ship. So regular patrolling in turns round the site. The big Gaise is amazing: some guy ropes, which are made of Paracord snapped, and left the seams intact on the tent.
    It has 32 storm cords, goal post pegs, and rocks inside holding it down, and it looks like a giant UFO trying to lift off it's moorings. The big Helsport centrepole snapped,(aluminium) so we will put a tree in it's place.

    Thankfully the storm's abating for now, so we survived!
    Thanks for the good feedback,
    Sara

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    Glad the storm is over. I hope there is not too much damage and that things get back to normal soon.
    Keith

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    i did wonder whether it would be possible to actually live in one of these tents, as the price seems great, but common sense got the better of me, ive enough projects on the go !!!

    http://www.britishmilitarysurplus.co...shopscr83.html
    sod work, im off for a paddle.

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    This looks great, After the weekend's damage, I might look into getting one. The trouble is that at 38 kg it's not so portable, and dark inside. Does it have a smoke hole? I suppose it would be easy enough to make one.
    Thanks for the link, a definite possiblity considering the price.

    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnr View Post
    i did wonder whether it would be possible to actually live in one of these tents, as the price seems great, but common sense got the better of me, ive enough projects on the go !!!

    http://www.britishmilitarysurplus.co...shopscr83.html

    I bet the price goes up when they have them in stock.

    If I remember correctly these come with a hole for a stove pipe

    I have a Lavvu/ Pyramid Tent, I made myself from much the same stuff, but I use only 4 Spruce Poles to hold it up.
    But it can be rather dark inside.

    But it was all free

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bothyman View Post
    I bet the price goes up when they have them in stock.

    If I remember correctly these come with a hole for a stove pipe

    I have a Lavvu/ Pyramid Tent, I made myself from much the same stuff, but I use only 4 Spruce Poles to hold it up.
    But it can be rather dark inside.

    But it was all free

    MickT

    i almost bought one last year. they had a fair few in stock, and i kept checking back every week or so, and the numbers slowly fell. then i decided to go ahead and buy one, but when i checked, they were all gone!! DOH!!! theyre probably cheap because, aside from the military and those living in the wilds, there probably isnt much of a market for such a specialised tent in the uk. though if you email them that youre interested, they might get some in stock. theyre selling camp beds too, for 8 quid each !!!!!
    sod work, im off for a paddle.

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    Thanks Motherherne-(pm sent).I appreciate your time in replying ... .
    Ahem--(told you i was ignorant-or lack of knowledge !!). I knew i recognised the Purbecks Name place-is your shop in corfe castle village??? We visit the Purbecks regularly- Worbarrow-&dancing ledge-(boy thats a hike ??) Gorgeous area...but yes ,windy .... Chat soon....
    The purpose of life is to live a life of purpose...

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    My cafe's in Swanage, and the community is fairly near Dancing Ledge. So DO come by, it would be great to meet you.

    Those arctic tents look so good, but they are 300/350 on other sites, so I bet they won't be 125 for long. Good tip for the bed though as mine has collapsed and is now propped up with logs.

    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

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    camp beds,

    http://www.britishmilitarysurplus.co...shopscr52.html

    check out the contents of the vehicles section of that site, theyre selling armoured cars and armoured saloon cars too!! bullet/blast proof vectra/mondeo anyone?
    sod work, im off for a paddle.

  29. #29
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    Thanks, will get a bed. My husband was in the forces, and his dream vehicle is a Humvee. Actually, it would be a great option, but hard to pull by goat when the petrol runs out.

    See ya, Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  30. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    . . I have seen other tipi stoves, but the ONLY one which is any good is the one Oli MadBear is selling, because you can cook on it, and also inside it, and empty it in situ.
    Sara
    I have just got my stove delivered have you got any tips for cooking inside it cos the only recipies i have seen are stove top ones, we are hoping to do some serious camping in our new Tundra Larvvu next year

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy's charles river View Post
    I have just got my stove delivered have you got any tips for cooking inside it cos the only recipies i have seen are stove top ones, we are hoping to do some serious camping in our new Tundra Larvvu next year
    First thing I would do with it is use it outside and get it hot to burn any nasties off it.
    Nothing worse than lighting a stove inside to discover it gives off smoke and fumes when first lit, but they are usually fine after that..

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

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    Hello,
    well anything that you can wrap (in tinfoil, I suppose). So Potatoes,fish,sweetcorn and peppers etc. I get a bed of good hot embers going with wood or coal, and than put a food parcel on. It's only a small door, but it makes a good extra bit for cooking.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

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    This weekend, we are going to construct an earth oven, as I hear we are going to have visitors for the Midwinter Solstice, and I will be cooking a big bit of meat. Will let you know how successful it is, as for a small oven, you only need an aluminium can.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

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    Sara

    What do you do for lighting during the long winter nights - paraffin lamps ? coleman lamps ? candles ? Any favourites among the group ?

    Also do people tend to have stoves in their tipis or open fires ?

    Really very interested in your lifestyle choice and way of life
    PWC
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    Why 'The Purbecks' area and have you lived in the area for long?

    TGB
    May the gentleness of morning, greet your silent passage through endless waters...

    May all your winds be gentle. And for ww - May it rain the night before.

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    Just to answer before we close up and I have two whole days off work....... we all have stoves in the Lavvus, no open fires. It's a lovely sight on a frosty night.The big Gaise model from tentipi which we use as a communal lodge also has a wood burner, but because the smoke hole is 3.6 metres high, the chimney is supported by metal butresses. In the recent storm of force 11, some guy ropes broke, and the centre pole started to keel over, but we held it up in time. If it had gone with the fire on, we would have probably burnt down! So now we have supported the centre pole and the stove chimney. Force 11 is a bit rare, so I think these tents are very safe for general camping. Our favourite lighting is paraffin hurricane lamps. Candles work out way too expensive.

    I have lived on Purbeck for 24 years, and know a few farmers, so to rent a field was quite easy: but when we come to buy our own land, I know we will be looking in Devon, Cornwall or Scotland, where land is cheaper, and the planning is not so restrictive.
    Thanks for the interest. Will take picures this weekend.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  37. #37
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    I used to deliver babies in benders (tarpaulin cover with bent branch frame) and old buses when I was a GP in Co.Sligo, as we had a good few New Age Traveller encampments). Very cosy, with stoves made from old gas cylinders with a door cut in the side and chimney welded into the top.

    Get a diesel Humvee and run it on vegetable oil. (it would take a few acres of rapeseed however :-( to get in and out to work)

    Glad you survived the storm - didn't know they existed on the south coast. :-)

    Best Wishes

    Frank

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    Unhappy

    Umm, yes, we get storms. And we are near a cliff, so we are windy at the best of times. Caspar has sent us a new Lavvu to try out. It's called the 'Afrika' and is heavy (38.5kg), although still portable. It has a built in floor, so no draughts, and is made of canvas and rubber, I think. He says it is totally waterproof, so we shall see if it gets condensation. The features on it are good and strong,and there is a chimney vent in the mosquito net over the smoke hole, which means you can be tucked in tight and still have outside light. It's dark green, so quite dark inside. I am going to move into it this weekend. If it's good, I shall buy it, as it is Cheaper than the tentipis, which we have had a few troubles with when it came to extreme weather.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  39. #39
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    Default

    I'm surprised you are using single pole Lavvu's rather than multipole ones as these will stand up a lot better than the single pole ones.
    Tentipi singlepole ones seem very expensive for what they are they seem to have got to the stage where Fashion meets Function, and their multipole Lavvu's seem expensive compared to such like as Northern Lavvu ones ?? how much difference would there be in price even after carriage and tax ???????????

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

  40. #40
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    Default

    Yeah, the multipole 'tipi' looks really cool. Very strong compared to the singlepole one.

    Must get to stay in one on a meet somewhere. I got a catalogue off 'Nordic Outdoor' at the Padlefest, and it is certianly a well thought out and functional design. Relativley cheap too.

    Got to be a good thing in winter wet weather.

    Nick
    Last edited by Scots_Charles_River; 19th-December-2007 at 05:32 PM.

  41. #41
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    Default

    I like the look of the multipoles, and there is bound to be a nicer space inside without a pole cutting the room in half. But the reason we don't go for multipoles is that they are less portable: the single poles pack up and can be carried in a pack. We replace them with trees when we get settled, which are 100% stable in storms.
    If we get a permanent piece of land, I will definately look to getting one of those, so thanks for the link.
    I am trying out a new model now, which is fitting the bill very well. It's called the Afrika, and retails at 599 for a 7-man. The built-in groundsheet means no more draughts. Bliss. Has a centrepole, and weighs 38 kg, so just about portable for one person.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    This weekend, we are going to construct an earth oven, as I hear we are going to have visitors for the Midwinter Solstice, and I will be cooking a big bit of meat. Will let you know how successful it is, as for a small oven, you only need an aluminium can.
    Sara
    we do earth oven with the Scouts food is always wonderful and never overcooked fish my fav

  43. #43
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    Default

    Cooking for 30ish to celebrate the MidWinter Solstice this weekend. Really looking forward to it. We have been out catching rabbits, pheasant, pigeon, and er, some venison. Beats throwing prawns on a barbie.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  44. #44
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    Default

    So who makes the "Afrika" Tent ??? by the spelling I presume it could be German??? more details please.
    The only problem I see with a sewn in Groundsheet is it could get warm in summer through lack of ventilation.

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

  45. #45
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    Default

    I've really enjoyed reading this thread, partly because I try not to live in a house whenever possible, partly because I was born in Swanage and partly because it's really good to hear how others adapt to life outside the 'norm'

    Keep the yarn going MH

    And Happy Solstice to everyone for tomorrow morning- Blessed Be!

  46. #46
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    Default

    Bright Blessings!

    What a fantastic blogg!! This has made me ignore 4 phone calls and 3 shouts from my staff asking questions!! FAB!

    Really interesting how you have adapted to the surroundings that you live in and I am sure that I speak for my partner (HawthornTree) and many of the members. You Lucky So and So!!

    I hope your weekend goes well and that you have a fab, safe and warm Christmas!!

    FlyBoy
    If it's outside then count me in!

  47. #47
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    Default

    I'm always interested in this kind of living. Wing and I lived in a 10'X10' tent for nine months, in the 1970s, while building a log house for a friend. Another friend lived in a teepee for one year - quite a feat in our area. There are a number of people, in our area, who live in the BWCA while the water is liquid and move into teepees in Superior Nat'l Forest during the winter. These are mostly hobo types, however, who make quite a mess of the environment. Law requires BWCA users to up-camp every two weeks - and they don't. In Superior Nat'l forest, you can camp where you like, but the camps these people have look like a pig sty. It would be nice to see it done right.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  48. #48
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    Default

    Wow, who'd a thought there would be that much interest! To answer Mickey, the Afrika is being imported by Caspar at Nordic Outdoor. It's made in Africa. The material is so heavy, that condensation forms around the perimeter, which is disappointing. It didn't happen with the Tentipi fabric. But the trade-off is no draughts. I don't find the name Afrika very inspiring, as when do they get storms and gale force winds in Africa?Ventilation is through three vents which are velcro'd down when not in use. The condensation occurs when I'm out at work and the Lavvu is shut down.
    I have to say that I'm finding the dark fabric a bit enclosing.The only real test of this new one is to wait for the next big storm.
    The last two days have been glorious: clear and frosty. I went to the recycling plant and if you stand on top of the bottle bank, you can see the Lavuus nestling in their field with the sea beyond. The landscape was bathed in a pinkish frosty light which threw long shadows. It was one of those moments when your heart bursts at the beauty before you.I felt so grateful that I have the freedom to live this way.
    Some of the community have been coppicing willow for the farmer, and we made some nice hurdles this afternoon.
    Will be off site now for a bit, but have a great Solstice everyone, and looking forward to longer days.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  49. #49
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    if you stand on top of the bottle bank, you can see the Lavuus nestling in their field with the sea beyond. The landscape was bathed in a pinkish frosty light which threw long shadows.
    This sounds like it 'd make a great photo.
    Keith

  50. #50
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    Nov 2007
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    Portstewart, Northern Ireland
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    Default Windbreak

    It sounds like your field may be rather exposed.

    I was brought up on Achill Island (west coast of Ireland) and even the stone houses had to have windbreaks there to survive.

    A good line of trees upwind makes a big difference to the force of the wind. Even a line of hurdles (as you mentioned constructing from the willow coppice) can help.

    Happy Solstice,

    Frank
    (Christian, but in touch with Mother Earth)

    Link to the Solstice webcam at Newgrange, Ireland:
    http://www.heritageireland.ie/en/Solstice2007/

  51. #51
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MotherHerne View Post
    Wow, who'd a thought there would be that much interest! To answer Mickey, the Afrika is being imported by Caspar at Nordic Outdoor. It's made in Africa. The material is so heavy, that condensation forms around the perimeter, which is disappointing. It didn't happen with the Tentipi fabric. But the trade-off is no draughts. I don't find the name Afrika very inspiring, as when do they get storms and gale force winds in Africa?Ventilation is through three vents which are velcro'd down when not in use. The condensation occurs when I'm out at work and the Lavvu is shut down.
    I have to say that I'm finding the dark fabric a bit enclosing.The only real test of this new one is to wait for the next big storm.
    The last two days have been glorious: clear and frosty. I went to the recycling plant and if you stand on top of the bottle bank, you can see the Lavuus nestling in their field with the sea beyond. The landscape was bathed in a pinkish frosty light which threw long shadows. It was one of those moments when your heart bursts at the beauty before you.I felt so grateful that I have the freedom to live this way.
    Some of the community have been coppicing willow for the farmer, and we made some nice hurdles this afternoon.
    Will be off site now for a bit, but have a great Solstice everyone, and looking forward to longer days.
    Sara
    Sara:

    Have any of your members considered plains style tipis? What do you see as the advantage of the dwellings you use over a tipi?
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  52. #52
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    Default Coffee

    A bit off Topic but as there are a few Coffee drinkers here thought it may be of interest to people who want to live in Lavvu's.

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

  53. #53
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    Default Coffee and Health

    Coffee was found to increase cholesterol (if boiled, but not if filtered or espressoed) in research in Finland. It is thought that it may be a factor in the historically high level of heart disease in Finland. A lot of the early research into risk factors for heart disease was done in Finland, and nowadays they do not have a higher level of heart disease than other West European countries - there's hope for us yet in UK.

    A Happy and not too healthy Christmas to all!

    Frank
    a GP in my spare (non-paddling) time

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windblown View Post
    Coffee was found to increase cholesterol (if boiled, but not if filtered or espressoed) in research in Finland. I

    A Happy and not too healthy Christmas to all!

    Frank
    a GP in my spare (non-paddling) time
    That's ok for me then .

    I don't even like the stuff .

    One of my favourite websites is

    >> http://www.nicecupofteaandasitdown.com/

    MickT
    It'll be right, trust me, I'm a Yorkshireman.



    ::>>> I'd rather be lucky, than good.

  55. #55
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    Hi Guys, just dipping in quickly as I had to cover for someone at work. It gets harder to leave the Tentipi village the longer you stay. We had an awesome Midwinter solstice. The weather was clear and still, with a light frost and a full moon, absolutely stunningly beautiful. All the chimneys were smoking and we sat in the big tentipi and told ghost stories and drank homebrew. The moon rose over the sea and it set the next morning exactly as the sun rose. For a few moments the tips of them were in the sky together. I don't suppose many house dwellers would have seen such a site. We crunched our way back over the frosty field and exchanged gifts which we had made for each other. I got a really neat gadget for making bowls with and a necklace made of rowan berries.Lots of Sloe liqueur and home made chocolates changed hands,knitted things and useful animal parts! We had a game stew with baked potatoes for lunch, with game we had caught ourselves. It was the best 'Christmas' I have ever spent. No commercialism, no pressure.
    Hope you all had a good one too,
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  56. #56
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    Default What a way to see the new year

    Hello Sara,

    I've been following your threads and think you've got it made! I look forward to hearing more of your exploits in 2008

    Glad you had a great Christmas, any chance of some pics of your home?

  57. #57
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    Default Living full time

    Bliss

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by bothyman View Post
    A bit off Topic but as there are a few Coffee drinkers here thought it may be of interest to people who want to live in Lavvu's.

    MickT
    We sometimes bring green coffee beans on canoe trips and roast them in a fry pan. To "grind" them, we place them in a sock (preferably an unworn sock) and, placing the sock on a rock - hit it with another rock. This doesn't do your socks any good.

    One store we stop at, about once a year, has a small brass coffee grinder. You can grind only a dozen, or so, beans at a time. It is small, expensive, and so far I've never bought one. Maybe this year.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  59. #59
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    After the storms of the last few weeks, I can say hand on heart that the Tentipis stand up to extreme weather the best. You definately get what you pay for. But after the new models were coming out with inferior stitching which leaked, we are going to design a lavvu based on our experiences this winter and get it run up by a firm in Chandlers Ford. (I think Tentipi have rectified the stitching problem now.) Other models, whilst probably good for many seasons in moderate weather, showed signs of strain, like holes appearing in the fabric. Very sad as they held up fine in Force 8's. The most depressing tent has been the prototype I have been testing which was badly let down by the stitching which ripped away, leaving the webbing straps still pegged in the ground and the tent only held down by the hearth stone!
    Mind you it was a Force 9. Also, the dark green colour was getting me down, and the fabric being 100% waterproof formed condensation. It felt like a cave!
    So I packed up me family and moved into the Tentipi Gaise, which WAS a communal lodge, but now I've comandeered it. The first night I had gone to bed, and everyone came in anyway, which was fun. It is 3.5 metres high, seats 30 people and has 32 storm cords. We nearly lost it in a force 11 when some guy ropes snapped and the centre pole was leaning, but now we have reinforced the pegs, and taken the advice of knowledgable folks on here and made shock absorbers from bungees at the peg ends. The force 8 at the weekend hardly moved it.
    I looked at the Norwegian Lavvu with retractable multipoles, but they are only for the 3 metres version, so no good for living. A family of 4 needs a 9-man for living if you aren't to kill each other.The great attraction of the tentipis is their portability.
    Well the field looks like a swamp, and the dogs keep jumping on my bed with muddy paws, but inside tentipi land our hearts are full of bliss that we don't have to worry about what to do when our energy saving light bulbs break and we get mercury poisoning.

    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

  60. #60
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    Big project this weekend is to make a Saami Kota out of the Tentipi canvas which is still viable after the seams ripped in that famous force 11. We have been gusting force 9 here all weekend, and replacing guys ropes which are snapping, but the tentipis are holding fine. I realise that being 4 years old, my canvas had gone brittle in the U.V. and I should have sprayed it.There is a farmer doing some coppicing nearby, so I am going to get 8 sycamore poles and wrap the old tentipi skin round and make myself a new home. Bought an SAS sleeping bag , and it is BLISS.Plenty of room to move around in, and SO toastie.
    Sara
    "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room"

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