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Thread: Building a stripper - gluing the strips: epoxy or balcotan/equivalent.

  1. #1

    Default Building a stripper - gluing the strips: epoxy or balcotan/equivalent.

    I gather when you build a stripper you glue each plank to the previous plank. In addition to using clamps or screws to keep the strips close to the moulds.

    Is it the case that most people opt for epoxy (when mixed with an appropriate filler) for its gap filling properties when gluing each strip to the next? Or could you get away with a polyurethane adhesive such as balcotan? Are the gaps typically large enough to justify epoxy?


    Any thoughts appreciated.
    Last edited by Jez55; 19th-November-2007 at 02:31 PM. Reason: bolding title? not sure it works that way though

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jez55 View Post
    I gather when you build a stripper you glue each plank to the previous plank. In addition to using clamps or screws to keep the strips close to the moulds.

    Is it the case that most people opt for epoxy (when mixed with an appropriate filler) for its gap filling properties when gluing each strip to the next? Or could you get away with a polyurethane adhesive such as balcotan? Are the gaps typically large enough to justify epoxy?


    Any thoughts appreciated.
    I've seen one done with Balcotan - worked well - But this assumes that you will sheath both sides, this done, the bond between the strips is of relatively trivial importance as the major loads are carried in the glass/epoxy layer and the timber acts as the core in a composite.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jez55 View Post
    I gather when you build a stripper you glue each plank to the previous plank. In addition to using clamps or screws to keep the strips close to the moulds.

    Is it the case that most people opt for epoxy (when mixed with an appropriate filler) for its gap filling properties when gluing each strip to the next? Or could you get away with a polyurethane adhesive such as balcotan? Are the gaps typically large enough to justify epoxy?


    Any thoughts appreciated.
    Hi I would go with epoxy the filled resin will add strength to the hull and balcotan although it is a good adhesive for large areas it is not a structural adhesive. You will have to sheath both the inside and outside with epoxy and glass fabric so you might as well use the one adhesive throughout and edge bonding strips does not use an enormous amount of resin. For a filler I would use cotton microfibre this acts as both a reservoir to ensure you do not get a dry joint and a reinforcement along every glue line.

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    Hi,
    When building my Prospector I just used ordinary carpenters glue, that white PVA stuff? I had quite a few gaps and used the same glue with wood flour(fine sawdust). That turned out very dark. Next time I will do my utmost not to have any gaps ie plane the planks so they're even and smooth, plus use better router bits for the bead & cove, and generally take more time over it. Good luck with yours!

    Busby

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    I'm sure there are better glues around today, but we've built many strippers over the years using Elmer's wood glue - which is not a water proof glue. As mentioned above - the wood is encased in glass on both sides, and unless the glass de-laminates - the glue that holds the wood together is not of supreme importance.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  6. #6
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    Default Cacamite anyone?

    Quote Originally Posted by pierre girard View Post
    I'm sure there are better glues around today, but we've built many strippers over the years using Elmer's wood glue - which is not a water proof glue. As mentioned above - the wood is encased in glass on both sides, and unless the glass de-laminates - the glue that holds the wood together is not of supreme importance.
    I've often thought that 'exterior' white PVA glue would work very well and although not totally waterproof does offer some water resistance. Has anyone used Cascamite, or Extramite as it now seems to be called? I used it to build one of Percy Blandfords designs 20 years ago, a fishing punt not a canoe but it is still as stuck together as the day it was built!

  7. #7
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    Default Glue choice

    Hi all,
    Just to put my two pence worth in, titebond original is a safe bet to use.
    I would be looking at purchasing a copy of canoecraft, this is invaluable for building a stripper. I might have a spare copy of ted moores (building a 15ft bobs special booklet lying around) voyager, i think it might be of great help to you, let me know, and i'll see if i can find it, although it might not be the canoe your building, the proceedures are the same.
    Steve

  8. #8

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    Hi, i always use Elch wood glue from screefix, d4 rated as strong as epoxy. Lumber jack is good glue but foams a lot. Gorilla glue very good but expensive and foams.

  9. #9

    Default Glue for strips

    If I were building a strip canoe I would use titebond III . It cleans up easy as is fully waterproof. Epoxy is unnecessary for inter plank gluing is expensive and difficult to clean up. Polyurethane is easy to clean off of the wood when cured, is very strong but near impossible to get off of your hands and clothes ,remember setting time is very influenced by temperature as well. I've done a lot of woodwork over the years and Titebond III is the best glue I've found so far, may be tempted with polyurethane on Teak or Iroko.
    Comments only applicable if you sheath the canoe in epoxy and glass, thats where the strength will come from.
    Ashley
    Can you do the Funky Gibbon?

  10. #10
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    This is a potential horrible mess

    Big discussion can be found Here on Wooden-Boat

    on Titebond
    The implications of all this can be minor if we are talking about a first-effort coffee table….but they can be serious and even dangerous if we are talking about a strip-planked boat hull made of 1 X 1 strips glued together using an unrepairable glue. Picture the requirement to feather in a large patch to repair hull damage, and you can see that patch will be pinstriped with unsound repair at every glue line, leading to early failure of the repair.

  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DougR View Post
    This is a potential horrible mess

    Big discussion can be found Here on Wooden-Boat

    on Titebond
    'Pritstick' it is then!

  12. #12
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    Default Ta very much!

    Quote Originally Posted by TOPTEC View Post
    Hi all,
    Just to put my two pence worth in, titebond original is a safe bet to use.
    I would be looking at purchasing a copy of canoecraft, this is invaluable for building a stripper. I might have a spare copy of ted moores (building a 15ft bobs special booklet lying around) voyager, i think it might be of great help to you, let me know, and i'll see if i can find it, although it might not be the canoe your building, the proceedures are the same.
    Steve
    Yes please! Would be very interested in taking a butchers at Ted Moores booklet.

    Thanks.

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