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Thread: Hiya

  1. #1
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    Default Hiya

    Just like to introduce myself

    name: Roddy
    age: 34
    canoe: Mad River Explorer RX
    experience: 4 years
    canoe buddy - Joanna
    location: western isles (Scotland)
    job: ecologist/civil servant
    favourite paddle: Glenfinnan to Eilean Shona (Loch Shiel - Loch Moidart)
    other interests: bushcraft, outdoor living, wildlife watching, photography, travel & erm football
    aspiration - north canada (Yukon & NWT)

  2. #2
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    Hi Roddy

    Sounds like you have plenty of information to share.Have you always been into Open Canoes or are you a convert tot he dark side from the world of kayaks?

    How are the Western Isles for Lochs and Rivers. I always tend to think of islands as being pretty devoid of paddling places except the sea. I am sure I am wrong but it is just one of these things that gets stuck in my head.

    Anyway, welcome aboard and make yourself at home.
    John

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    Hi Roddy

    Sounds like you have plenty of information to share.Have you always been into Open Canoes or are you a convert tot he dark side from the world of kayaks?

    How are the Western Isles for Lochs and Rivers. I always tend to think of islands as being pretty devoid of paddling places except the sea. I am sure I am wrong but it is just one of these things that gets stuck in my head.

    Anyway, welcome aboard and make yourself at home.
    Been paddlin for 4 years and its always been open canoes for me, dont really like the kayaks as much. The canoe club here pretty much concentrates on sea kayaking so we've really just taught ourselves from the Mason video & books with a little help from the McGuffin one

    Western Isles is pants for rivers I am afraid but the loch situation is pretty good (Grimersta/Langavat system being a good un) theres plenty of opportunities on the sea as well with offshore islands being a favourite (Scarp, Pabbay, Taransay, Little Bernera etc). Theres some good tidal channels about that are quite like rivers as well (8 knots is pretty fast!). The main problem here is the wind which always seems to be howling when you've got a few days of work - ho hum.

    we try and get over to the mainland 2x a year for week long trips as well - favourites have included Loch Shiel, Loch Morar, Loch Sunart and Loch Quoich.

    Thanks for the welcome

  4. #4
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    I've still to try sea paddling. Tide and currents are things I have never had to deal with. Next year once the weather improves I will try some sea trips
    John

  5. #5
    monkey_pork's Avatar
    monkey_pork is offline a wind age, a wolf age - before the world goes headlong Super Moderator
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    Ah yes, the sea, the sea ...



    I found the following quoted passage on the South West Coast Path website: (It's from Tarka the Otter by Henry Williamson).

    "One evening, when the ebb-tide was leaning the channel buoys to the west, and the gulls were flying silent and low over the sea to the darkening cliffs of the headland, the otters set out on a journey. The bright eye of the lighthouse, a bleached bone at the edge of the sandhills, blinked in the clear air. They were carried down amidst swells and topplings of waves in the wake of a ketch, while the mumble of the bar grew in their ears. Beyond the ragged horizon of grey breakers the day had gone, clouded and dull, leaving a purplish pallor on the cold sea".

    This was written from the land between the Taw and Torridge Rivers in North Devon, but for me there is such a feeling for the SW Sea in that simple passage...
    Last edited by monkey_pork; 19th-December-2005 at 09:54 PM.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly
    I've still to try sea paddling. Tide and currents are things I have never had to deal with. Next year once the weather improves I will try some sea trips
    Hmm ... watch out for the waves! They come at you from all directions!

    Seriously though there are some fantastic sea lochs in Scotland well worth a long weekend. It adds a whole new dimension to paddling.

    H - x

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquanaut
    we try and get over to the mainland 2x a year for week long trips as well - favourites have included Loch Shiel, Loch Morar, Loch Sunart and Loch Quoich.
    Hi Roddy,

    We're hoping to paddle one or more of these lochs next spring. We'd also like to explore Loch Teacuis, off Sunart. Have you been there and if so any tips on putting in and car parking?

    Thanks

    Sally

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leafletter
    Hi Roddy,

    We're hoping to paddle one or more of these lochs next spring. We'd also like to explore Loch Teacuis, off Sunart. Have you been there and if so any tips on putting in and car parking?

    Thanks

    Sally

    Hi Sally

    we put in off Loch Teacuis' western shore at the very southern edge the access and parking is tricky though and we ended up driving down the landrover track a wee way and leaving the car at the shore. dont know how "legit" this is but nobody stopped us....?

    check that tide tables & possibly the yachtsman's guide before you go as the gap between Oronsay and the mainland dries at low tide plus the west sound at Carna is very shallow at low tide (it migt dry completely too), there are fairly strong currents at a couple of places on the loch (mid and carna channels) at peak flow. Teacuis is good for paddling with common seals and we saw otters (1 mother and 2 wee uns) close up there too, its also an excellent entry point to south sunart, glen cripesdale, poll luachrain and that area. note loch na droma buidhe is popular as a yacht anchorage and has a salmon farm so although it looks remote it may be busy(ish) its all relative

    dont know if you've seen this but it may be useful

    http://www.gla.ac.uk/medicalgenetics...ing_sunart.htm

    be aware that its a very long walk up loch morar pulling your canoe if the west wind picks up - theres tales of a few canoeists getting storm bound at the east end of the loch for days! so check the forecast (even more so than usual), let someone know your plans and take extra food on that journey.

    hope that helps, let me know if you'd like any further info

    Roddy

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