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Thread: River access

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Somerset lad exiled in Surrey
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    Default River access

    Thought I would delve into a bit of high tech wizardry and post some pictures

    If you have read some of my earlier posts you will know that I have just ordered a Mad River 14tt - can't sleep for excitement!!!

    Anyway I will be able to practice those strokes on the River Wey which runs along the bottom of the garden, however the bank is fairly steep and overgrown [where I cannot reach with the mower or strimmer] so yesterday I decided to cut in some steps.



    There were a few big stone slabs at the the bottom. Looks like the bank may have had some sort of reinforcement many years ago, which have since fallen away.

    This has meant that I was unable to put the posts in where I wanted, so two odd-shaped final steps!



    Oh well they will just have to look rustic. Anyway I have easier access to the river now

    This is the view looking upstream:



    Plan to cover the steps in wood chippings.

    Looking into the future I thought I might construct a small jetty. Any thoughts on how I could do this?

    Cheers for now.
    Last edited by Sprout; 30th-April-2006 at 02:10 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
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    Default

    You're going to make so many people jealous

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Nr Rochester in Kent
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    Default

    Always thought these look pretty easy, though maybe not very pretty! They advertise in the BCU magazine regularly.

    http://www.easyfloat.com/eng/index_1.html
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


  4. #4

    Default

    wow! what a fantastic thing to have at the end of your garden
    “Who can long watch the ceaseless lapping of a rivers current, without conceiving a desire to set himself adrift”

  5. #5
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    Bolton, Lancs
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    Default

    Oh to have a garden, never mind a river!
    Damian


    I would rather have an amusing story to tell than a unfulfilled dream.

  6. #6
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    Default

    MK - everyday I think how lucky I am to live here.

    Matto - great info, just what I was looking for.........Many Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default

    This must be everyones dream - certainly one of mine.

    I just wonder if constructing a jetty requires some consultation with the authority responsible for the river. I would guess that they would like to interfere in some way if it may affect the flow of water, they usually do.
    Though I can't see that a floating one would be a problem.
    Q

  8. #8
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    Good point Quercus [by the way are you sessile or pedunculate?].......... I think a floating jetty would,as you say be less intrusive to water flow.

    Would appreciate any advice from those with such knowledge.....

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Hunter Lake, Minnesota, USA
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    Beautiful site!

    We have a floating dock, though nothing near as fine as the one on the website listed above. The floating part is an old life raft off a 1000 footer (ore boat). We get it in and out of the water by means of a couple old all metal farm machinery wheels.

    I was wondering what local authorities would have to say about a dock on your river. We are kind of "grandfathered in" on such things - as our place was built in the 1920s. New restrictions on such things (locally) are much more stringent.
    The perfect canoe -
    Like a leaf on the water

  10. #10
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    "Quercus [by the way are you sessile or pedunculate?].......... "


    I was born a pedunculate but now I'm an adopted sessile.

    or to explain for those who are wondering what that means.

    Quercus Robur, the pedunculate or English oak is more common to the southern and easterly parts of UK the Quercus petraea, Sessile oak is common to the wetter western and northern parts.
    I was born in London now living in Skye.

    Though the pedunculate oak tends to produce the better timber there is something very beautiful about the stunted and twisted lichen covered oaks of the western oakwoods. Britains own rain forest!

    Q

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