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Thread: Lough Erne, Derryvore Bay, Drumard Lough, Crom.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Default Lough Erne, Derryvore Bay, Drumard Lough, Crom.

    It’s the middle of August, the forecast is good, time for another Mothership trip.
    There are a couple of loughs near Crom that I wanted to explore.
    I motored through mirror glass stillness to the dock in Derryvore Bay then paddled round the bay, it is a lot bigger than I expected. (green line on the map.)


    Map

    The dock was busy with cruisers and water skiers, but they remained within 100yds of the dock and I was left in peace on into the bay.


    Derryvore Dock








    All the coots at the top end of the bay were not used to seeing a boat and took off for cover.


    I landed at the top end of the bay for a tea break.


    Then set up the sail for the run back to the dock.


    The sailing was gentle and relaxing


    A strong squall allowed me to show of my sailing prowess as I threw in a final jibe and crashed into the dock.

    Day two was forecast to be wet and windy, so I planned a relatively short paddle into Turfhouse Bay behind Crom Castle. The weather turned out better than forecast. (blue line)


    departing Derryvore Dock


    at the slipway for Crom Church


    Crom Church


    One of the Crom Estate cottages.


    tea break at the north entrance to Turfhouse Bay.


    local residents preparing for a fishing trip.


    through the reed beds and into Turfhouse Bay.


    lunch stop in Turfhouse Bay


    the bridge onto Inisherk


    the Crom boathouse.


    afternoon tea stop at Crom Old Castle.


    passing Gad Island on the way back to Derryvore.

    Day three was forecast to be bright and windy. I wanted to explore Drumard Lough which connects to the Erne system by a channel at Foalies Cut. I headed away south from the dock with a strong tailwind, so strong I did not need to put up the sail, just paddled and got blown along. (red line)


    Leaving Derryvore dock. All the rowdies have gone.


    Getting blown past Gad Island. It is so windy the Cormorants are all sitting it out.


    The swans have all gathered in a bay to shelter, this is on the approach to the Woodford river, and I cross the border into the Republic at this point.


    the junction of the Woodford and the channel through Foalies Cut to Belturbet.


    the entrance to Foalies Cut, I turned right here into the channel to Drumard Lough.


    family life on Lough Erne


    a holiday home development


    a tea stop in Drumard Lough


    an ex-rental Broom boat, an earlier version of my boat.


    entering Foalies Cut. The river flow here was significant and required some stiff paddling.


    I was followed into the Cut by 3 canoes with 6 teenagers doing their Duke of Ed expedition. They were having such fun.

    Back on the Erne River, partially sheltered by the land, I was able to set the sail up.


    the only cruiser I met all day.


    more family life.


    Lunch stop near Bloody Pass, and back into Northern Ireland.


    approaching Crom Farmyard.


    Tea and a portion of Rhubard Pie, in the Café.


    The dock at Crom Farmyard

    From here it was a long into wind slog back to Derryvore. A slog made much easier by my electric paddling friend Min Kota.

    A great 3 days exploring the Crom area, with the home comforts of the Mothership as a B&B
    Last edited by Mr Nick; 20th-August-2019 at 05:52 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Nottingham
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    Great pictures!
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

  3. #3
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    Lochwinnoch, Scotland
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    Great pictures and blogg but the thing I keep coming back to is the map. Just looking at that I can see so many paddling opportunities. It looks like an area with a lifetime of canoe exploring in it.
    John

  4. #4
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    Why didn't I know about this area?

    Looks like fabulous canoe or sail and oar landscape.
    This post may vanish at any moment.

  5. #5
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    May 2010
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    Looks like fabulous canoe or sail and oar landscape.
    It is. I paddled there in May, with the advice and assistance of Big Al and another of team Norn Iron. It's fascinating place, historically and geographically - the landscape is an area of flooded drumlins.

  6. #6
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    Dec 2007
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    Newtownards, Northern Ireland.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly View Post
    Great pictures and blogg but the thing I keep coming back to is the map. Just looking at that I can see so many paddling opportunities. It looks like an area with a lifetime of canoe exploring in it.
    I have been exploring Lough Erne with the assistance of the Mothership for 8 years now, and still there are many places to discover.
    I believe the Erne/Shannon system to be the most beautiful and unspoiled inland waterways of Europe. (I am biased though)

    Nick

  7. #7
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    Another excellent trip.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  8. #8
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    Surrey
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    Always interesting, Nick. I was worried for a while that there had been no mention of cakes or pastries, but you came through in the end...
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  9. #9
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    Aug 2008
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    Amersfoort, Netherlands
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    If we were to come back to Ireland one day, then Lough Erne and the Erne Shannon waterway is what we would want to paddle again.
    Thanks for the blog.

  10. #10

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    Nice report and nice pictures. Looks like you could get lost in there.

    My vocabulary needs some attention. Is Lough Erne pronounced Loff Urn? Also, what is a drumlin (Chris B)?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Lough is pronounced the same as the Scottish equivalent, Loch, so far as my ears can tell, and Urn is close enough. A drumlin is a rounded hill of glacial moraine, shaped like half an egg or the back of a spoon. In the case of Lough Erne, it wasn't just a glacier but the ice sheet that left them, so they're much bigger and over a wider area than typically - they cover much of the border area but it's only in L Erne that they're flooded.

  12. #12
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    We also have quite a few flooded drumlins in Strangford Lough too. And the area surrounding Strangford Lough is studded with them too. Makes it quite picturesque countryside.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

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