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Thread: Pims, Paddles and Pith helmets - Thinking of my Dad

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    Aldershot
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    Default Pims, Paddles and Pith helmets - Thinking of my Dad

    Bit of a ramble coming up.................

    As a nod to my Dad's 26 years of service to Queen & Country, I decided that my pith helmet should be fitted with his cap-badge.

    He was away for a lot of my early childhood; Malaya, Cypress, Borneo and Northern Ireland among others but polishing it with a tooth-brush and Brasso brought back vivid memories of him spending evenings in front of the telly polishing, bulling and darning.

    When he was home, he was a good Dad though; I only got a smack when I bloody-well deserved it.

    He taught me to be responsible by trusting me with responsibility. From a very early age, I carried a knife and matches, welded cars, rowed boats, fired rifles, rode motorbikes and drove cars.
    We shot and ferreted rabbits, and caught loads of mackerel in a dinghy powered by a Seagull 40 plus.

    He never fixed anything for me but taught me how.

    In his last years in the Army, he was in a training regiment and in the school holidays he would often take me to work. Before my teens I had pretty-much completed Basic Training and fired most infantry weapons; .303, SLR, Sterling SMG, LMG, GPMG and even a 66 rocket launcher. I even did NBC training in the gas chamber (CS gas is not a whole lot of fun !!!)

    I remember being with one group or Troggs (Trainiee soldiers) about to fire SLRs for the first time and being used to demonstrate it's safe use. At 12-years old, I was taller than my Dad and a more than competent shot.

    My Dad was always the fittest, strongest, toughest bloke and could out-run, out-lift and out-think many half his age.

    Unfortunately, he developed Alzheimer's in his mid 70s and I lost my Dad about three years before he died.

    He never got to meet his Great Grandchildren.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    3,570

    Default

    What great memories, it's good you remember your Dad with affection - I envy you that.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,343

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigyellowtractor View Post
    Bit of a ramble coming up.................

    As a nod to my Dad's 26 years of service to Queen & Country, I decided that my pith helmet should be fitted with his cap-badge.

    He was away for a lot of my early childhood; Malaya, Cypress, Borneo and Northern Ireland among others but polishing it with a tooth-brush and Brasso brought back vivid memories of him spending evenings in front of the telly polishing, bulling and darning.

    When he was home, he was a good Dad though; I only got a smack when I bloody-well deserved it.

    He taught me to be responsible by trusting me with responsibility. From a very early age, I carried a knife and matches, welded cars, rowed boats, fired rifles, rode motorbikes and drove cars.
    We shot and ferreted rabbits, and caught loads of mackerel in a dinghy powered by a Seagull 40 plus.

    He never fixed anything for me but taught me how.

    In his last years in the Army, he was in a training regiment and in the school holidays he would often take me to work. Before my teens I had pretty-much completed Basic Training and fired most infantry weapons; .303, SLR, Sterling SMG, LMG, GPMG and even a 66 rocket launcher. I even did NBC training in the gas chamber (CS gas is not a whole lot of fun !!!)

    I remember being with one group or Troggs (Trainiee soldiers) about to fire SLRs for the first time and being used to demonstrate it's safe use. At 12-years old, I was taller than my Dad and a more than competent shot.

    My Dad was always the fittest, strongest, toughest bloke and could out-run, out-lift and out-think many half his age.

    Unfortunately, he developed Alzheimer's in his mid 70s and I lost my Dad about three years before he died.

    He never got to meet his Great Grandchildren.
    Love this Col. I'll be proud to stand next to a chap wearing his dad's cap badge as we go "into battle" and raise a drink to him.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,343

    Default

    Doh, accidentally posted in the wrong thread
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

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