Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Pims, Paddles and Pith helmets - Thinking of my Dad

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Aldershot
    Posts
    490

    Default Pims, Paddles and Pith helmets - Thinking of my Dad

    Bit of a ramble coming up.................

    As a nod to my Dad's 26 years of service to Queen & Country, I decided that my pith helmet should be fitted with his cap-badge.

    He was away for a lot of my early childhood; Malaya, Cypress, Borneo and Northern Ireland among others but polishing it with a tooth-brush and Brasso brought back vivid memories of him spending evenings in front of the telly polishing, bulling and darning.

    When he was home, he was a good Dad though; I only got a smack when I bloody-well deserved it.

    He taught me to be responsible by trusting me with responsibility. From a very early age, I carried a knife and matches, welded cars, rowed boats, fired rifles, rode motorbikes and drove cars.
    We shot and ferreted rabbits, and caught loads of mackerel in a dinghy powered by a Seagull 40 plus.

    He never fixed anything for me but taught me how.

    In his last years in the Army, he was in a training regiment and in the school holidays he would often take me to work. Before my teens I had pretty-much completed Basic Training and fired most infantry weapons; .303, SLR, Sterling SMG, LMG, GPMG and even a 66 rocket launcher. I even did NBC training in the gas chamber (CS gas is not a whole lot of fun !!!)

    I remember being with one group or Troggs (Trainiee soldiers) about to fire SLRs for the first time and being used to demonstrate it's safe use. At 12-years old, I was taller than my Dad and a more than competent shot.

    My Dad was always the fittest, strongest, toughest bloke and could out-run, out-lift and out-think many half his age.

    Unfortunately, he developed Alzheimer's in his mid 70s and I lost my Dad about three years before he died.

    He never got to meet his Great Grandchildren.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    3,572

    Default

    What great memories, it's good you remember your Dad with affection - I envy you that.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigyellowtractor View Post
    Bit of a ramble coming up.................

    As a nod to my Dad's 26 years of service to Queen & Country, I decided that my pith helmet should be fitted with his cap-badge.

    He was away for a lot of my early childhood; Malaya, Cypress, Borneo and Northern Ireland among others but polishing it with a tooth-brush and Brasso brought back vivid memories of him spending evenings in front of the telly polishing, bulling and darning.

    When he was home, he was a good Dad though; I only got a smack when I bloody-well deserved it.

    He taught me to be responsible by trusting me with responsibility. From a very early age, I carried a knife and matches, welded cars, rowed boats, fired rifles, rode motorbikes and drove cars.
    We shot and ferreted rabbits, and caught loads of mackerel in a dinghy powered by a Seagull 40 plus.

    He never fixed anything for me but taught me how.

    In his last years in the Army, he was in a training regiment and in the school holidays he would often take me to work. Before my teens I had pretty-much completed Basic Training and fired most infantry weapons; .303, SLR, Sterling SMG, LMG, GPMG and even a 66 rocket launcher. I even did NBC training in the gas chamber (CS gas is not a whole lot of fun !!!)

    I remember being with one group or Troggs (Trainiee soldiers) about to fire SLRs for the first time and being used to demonstrate it's safe use. At 12-years old, I was taller than my Dad and a more than competent shot.

    My Dad was always the fittest, strongest, toughest bloke and could out-run, out-lift and out-think many half his age.

    Unfortunately, he developed Alzheimer's in his mid 70s and I lost my Dad about three years before he died.

    He never got to meet his Great Grandchildren.
    Love this Col. I'll be proud to stand next to a chap wearing his dad's cap badge as we go "into battle" and raise a drink to him.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,364

    Default

    Doh, accidentally posted in the wrong thread
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fleet, Hants..
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    That took some guts to post that Col. your opened up your soul there fella!

    I never knew my old man Col ,my mother told me before she died that he was a Danish skipper, that she met whilst helping Jewish refugees escape from 'central Europe'....Budapest!

    As as a young boy growing up in Bristol, as my mother then ran a guest house at the time, I not only met former Royal Marine Commandos that fought in WW2 but also German paratroopers! - One, who I remember by the name of Rudy -who taught me how to pin a man down with both knees & one hand...and then finish him off with your spare hand to the throat....not bad teaching for an 10yr old eh!

    8yrs later, I was a fully trained British Paratrooper stationed in Aldershot, who came top of his course! .....and reminded all along the way, by many seasoned instructors, how good the German Fallschirmjager were, and still are to this day...

    There have been one or two other engagements since...some of which I'm still fighting the demons.....

    I noticed your cap badge on the day, but didn't get the chance to ID it completely, I put it down at the time to the The Royal Corps of Transport, at first glance. Pls. now correct me if I'm wrong.

    A Brother in Arms....

    MB
    Last edited by Bonarmbj; Yesterday at 10:22 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    22,364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonarmbj View Post

    I noticed your cap badge on the day, but didn't get the chance to ID it completely, I put it down at the time to the The Royal Corps of Transport at the time, at first glance. Pls. now correct me if I'm wrong.


    Royal Army Service Corps


    (blog tomorrow, hopefully!)
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fleet, Hants..
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    I wasn't far off! - Nice shot Mal!
    Keep yer paddles wet, and powder dry....

    MB

    `..`. ><(((( ((>
    `..`..`. ><((((>

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Aldershot
    Posts
    490

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonarmbj View Post
    That took some guts to post that Col. your opened up your soul there fella!

    I don't know the date my Dad died (without looking it up) so don't think about him one day a year, there are loads of memory triggers and polishing that badge brought loads back.




    Quote Originally Posted by Bonarmbj View Post
    I never knew my old man Col ,my mother told me before she died that he was a Danish skipper, that she met whilst helping Jewish refugees escape from 'central Europe'....Budapest!


    As as a young boy growing up in Bristol, as my mother then ran a guest house at the time, I not only met former Royal Marine Commandos that fought in WW2 but also German paratroopers! - One, who I remember by the name of Rudy -who taught me how to pin a man down with both knees & one hand...and then finish him off with your spare hand to the throat....not bad teaching for an 10yr old eh!

    A useful skill in preparation for senior school :-)



    Quote Originally Posted by Bonarmbj View Post
    8yrs later, I was a fully trained British Paratrooper stationed in Aldershot, who came top of his course! .....and reminded all along the way, by many seasoned instructors, how good the German Fallschirmjager were, and still are to this day...

    My dad trained to "Jump out of perfectly serviceable aircraft" and for a while was part of the Silver Stars display team (I just looked on t'internet to check I had the name right and found that the RASC/RCT team pre-dates the Para's Red-Devils, how odd)




    Quote Originally Posted by Bonarmbj View Post
    There have been one or two other engagements since...some of which I'm still fighting the demons.....

    You do well to keep the bastards at bay.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bonarmbj View Post
    I noticed your cap badge on the day, but didn't get the chance to ID it completely, I put it down at the time to the The Royal Corps of Transport, at first glance. Pls. now correct me if I'm wrong.


    A Brother in Arms....MB



    That badge is as Mal said, RASC. My Dad did National Service and stayed in for a bit then was a civvy for a year or so before reinlisting. I think it changed to RCT while he was on his first stint. The only RCT badges I can find have been blacked and I thought the brass badge suited better.
    Although primarily a transport/logistics regiment, I know my Dad was an infantry soldier, parachutist, dispatch rider, Water-cannon operator, etc, etc, etc. And in latter years, tought spotty yoofs to wash, shave, dress, cook and how to kill people.
    Last edited by bigyellowtractor; Today at 07:31 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •