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Thread: Adult and child paddles

  1. #1

    Default Adult and child paddles

    We've just bought our first canoe but now need some paddles.
    Looking for two adult paddles for a 6' male and 5' 4" female and three children's paddles (4 1/2, 3 and 5 months - he doesn't need a paddle yet but will do soon!). I saw a thread on here which recommended wooden owl paddles - has anyone got some which their children have outgrown?
    And any tips on adult paddles - we're going to be out on the Norfolk Broads mainly, and probably, not that regularly, so preferably cheap ish, light and robust.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Cheap, light, strong; the three countering properties of materials. Selecting one of these generally negates the other two.

  3. #3
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    About the cheapest wooden paddle you can buy is from Decathlon. I got one as a first paddle. Not actually too horrible at all; 59" so a tad short for you perhaps but might be about spot on for your bow paddler.

    I bought a Grey Owl "Owlet" for my Grand Daughter who has just turned four. Canoe and Kayak store are keenly priced on G.O. paddles and I can't fault their service.

    I have a G.O. guide (amongst others now) which is a very nice paddle considering it only cost about 70.00

  4. #4
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    Sep 2014
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    Lancaster
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    If you can't pick any up second hand I think the redtail from Norfolk Marine are both good value and good quality for adult and children's paddles: https://www.norfolkmarine.co.uk/shop...1270_1271.html

  5. #5
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    Bangor, Co Down.
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    Check out the Norfolk Marine website and look at Redtail paddles. Can't fault them for price or quality.

    Edit.
    Ooops should have read previous post.
    Last edited by Big Al.; 31st-December-2018 at 08:33 PM.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    Almeria, Spain
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    Cheap, light, strong; the three countering properties of materials. Selecting one of these generally negates the other two.
    What an unhelpful comment!

    The original post actually reads 'cheapish, light and robust' - which is perfectly feasible with paddles for general use.

    Happy New Year to all the forum readers and contributors.

    Regards,
    Nick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    S-o-T, U.K.
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    Everything is relative and it depends on your personal definitions of cheap, light & robust.
    As a "do anything" robust general canoe paddle I really like the Ainsworth c100 paddles, plastic sheathed aluminium shafts and pretty bombproof blades. Our club have virtually every standard size length they do and there is the option of asking for the "Dragon Boat" blade profile ... which can also give a smaller blade area for smaller/junior paddlers. I recently cut down one of my old C100s and converted it into a junior paddle, it's been loaned out and was returned today after being used by various youngsters on a Pontcysyllte Aqueduct paddling trip. If you want robust & dependable these work well.
    OK so I've upgraded my Ainsworth c100, it's my old one that was converted. My new one has a carbon shaft ... it's a tad more expensive ... probably weighs about the same as the aluminium shafted ones but it should survive my prying off the gunwales better than the standard c100.
    Small lightweight wooden paddles will work really well for younger paddlers, you've suggestions above, younger paddlers are unlikely to inflict the damage that I occasionally inflict on my wooden paddle shafts and as your blade is likely to be deeper in the water you'll find the rocks first
    I've an all carbon Ainsworth river paddle and a ZRE carbon racing paddle, I regard them both as light & robust at least for their intended purposes ... one is almost exactly half the weight of the other.
    Wooden blades can be a delight to use. My usual bow paddler Diana has her own personalized and cherished Downcreek wooden paddle and now her own personalized c100 (I've laser engraved the blade ) for use in shallower/rocky areas.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  8. Default

    Thanks for the tips and thoughts, will have a look at redtail if I can't find any second hand.

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