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Thread: Recommendations for a Kayak to take your dog out on.

  1. #1

    Default Recommendations for a Kayak to take your dog out on.

    Hello All,


    To start out I'm a novice at kayaking and looking to purchase a kayak for some recreational use. I've looked at several hard shells but haven't found one at a reasonable price that would fit myself and my dog (black lab, roughly 90lb's". I've read some good things about inflatable kayaks but never used one so I am a little skeptical. If any of you fine folks have a recommendation on a particular kayak, or can just share your experiences with kayaking with your pets that would be great!

    Interested:- Best Kayaks For Dogs

    If you have any experience those kayaks share with me.

    Thanks in advance for your recommendation.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    I'm not sure how one gets a large dog in a Kayak, much less in an inflatable although I guess someone does so?
    Wouldn't a Canoe....a solid one.....be preferable? Many do indeed take substantial dogs with them in those......for example my Charles River would have no problem with such an animal one or two up, nor would many designs, the animal being suitably trained!

    (Open to offers on the Charles River? to make room for another boat!!)

  3. #3
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    A tandem sit-on-top kayak might work although you might have more of a job persuading your dog to stay on it with you. Personally I'd use a canoe ... whatever you choose don't tie your dog to the paddle craft ... dogs are far safer able to swim free should you both fall in.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Somebody asked the same question a few years ago:
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/forum/showthread.php/44541-Suitable-kayak-for-taking-the-dog?
    Some suggestions there for fishing sit-on-tops which tend to have gear space which can be adapted as dog space.

    If you want to use an inflatable, I think you'll need one which is designed as a double, given the size and weight of your dog. I've had Gumotex inflatables (only singles) which are pretty tough, and I don't see why a double shouldn't work. I'd recommend some sort of non-slip mat for the dog, to protect the boat from claws, and also make the dog feel more secure and less likely to jump around.
    Not in Oxford any more...

  5. #5

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    There is a guy on another site who takes his springer out on his SOT kayak, however after having my spaniel try to topple us when we were out in our canoe when ducks or geese went past it is something I would not recommend in anything but a canoe and I hope it is a good obedient dog rather than a daft spaniel

  6. #6
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    There was a blog a few years ago from a lady who did the Caledonian Canal in a 10-foot inflatable, with a spaniel. Unfortunately no photos of how she managed to fit everything on.
    Not in Oxford any more...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Glasgow
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    I have a sit on top kayak, albeit a slightly tippy one, which i dont try to take my small spaniel on. Not enough space for her to be comfy, and shes also not keen on the tippyness of it. I think the higher sides of a canoe would make her feel a bit happier also.

    Maybe one of the wider more stable sots would be better, but it'll depend on how the dog takes to it. I dont know any makes offhand to recommend, but bear in mind wider and more stable also generally means slower and heavier.

    Depending on the paddling you want to do, it would be worth considering a canoe if you arent 100% set on it being a kayak.

  8. #8

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    Well, if you google image search 'inflatable kayak dog' you'll see that people do it in all sorts of boats. It will be like having a non-paddling, medium sized child so you'll want the extra room that a tandem kayak gives you. With inflatables, you pretty much get what you pay for. Entry level stuff like the Intex boats or the Sevylor Tahiti is fairly low quality, so you won't have a particularly enjoyable paddling experience and there is a risk of the thinnish, unprotected vinyl being punctured by a dog's claws. But you may be prepared to accept these compromises if your key concerns are not spending a fortune and just wanting to have a bit of a waft around.

    Tougher boats like the Sevylor Colorado/Zpro Tango/Itiwit 2 man have a more robust outer cover that would I'm sure be more than equal to a bit of dog claw scrabbling and will be fine to paddle. I'm not a huge fan but lots of people - including people who post here - are and there's usually a couple knocking around secondhand on ebay. If you're looking to buy new, retailers like Go Outdoors and Decathlon quite often have pretty decent discounts on these boats. RRP of the Itiwit is around 200, which isn't bad. Most of the Gumotex range that mary refers to are very good boats but they're more pricey and arguably a bit overkill for what you're looking for. If you do decide to go down that road then a Palava would probably be a very nice dog transporter that should give you years and years of trouble-free service. Gonna set you back 700 quid though. Similarly Sea Eagles (if you ignore their entry level Sport Kayak range) are super tough but you won't get any change from 1,000

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    I don't think anyone has yet mentioned folding kayaks (sorry if they have, I was skimming the earlier messages as I'm meant to be working!). The long and wide cockpit of kayaks like the Klepper, Pouch or Wayland might be just what you are looking for. You don't have to fold your kayak every time you go out, if you have the space to leave it set up. Many folks do just that. But they do also fold away, if you want to keep them in a flat or a cupboard, or an RV/caravan, or the boot of your estate car.
    Some people paddle the doubles as singles, which would give you lots of space for a dog—even a big one. Some people paddle their kayak with a single blade. Some people stick sails on them. There is more info at the foldingkayaks.org website and I know at least one person there takes his dog kayaking. Search for tsunamichuck and his dog (a terrier) Paris, who paddle in Alaska. (Some great photos of paddling amid glaciers and ice flows.)
    If you don't need the ability to fold you could also look at something like a PBK (Percy Bland Kayak) which has the same long and wide cockpit as a Klepper.
    Just a thought ...

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