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Thread: Bannock

  1. #1
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    Default Bannock

    I've been around the block a few times and I've done a few expeditions but I've never been the cook.

    So today I made my first Bannock. And it was a truly enlightening experience. Firstly, it was great to actually make something and to understand the process. But secondly it was the ability to connect the activity to canoeing. To be able to say, hey, canoeing here is over for the season but I've got so many things to try which will connect me to next year's experiences.

    It wasn't the best bannock, but it was mine

  2. #2
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    I was thinking to do that. How easy did you find it? I want to do this with the kids in our little expeds.

  3. #3
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    It was very easy. Flour, baking powder, salt, butter and water (next time I might add a little sugar). Mix into a dough and then flatten it out (Mine was a little too thick at an inch so half an inch would probably be better). Then fry it in a pan with oil. The trick is not burning it before it is cooked through.

  4. #4
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    The great thing about bannock is that you start off with a flour and lard goo and go from there. To keep it less messy you can mix the ingredients in a plastic bag and cut the corner off to squeeze into the pan (this will be the bag you carry the flour in). You can add raisins and sugar or herbs or a little cheese (too much and it gets greasy). Using vegetable shortening is useful on journeys where butter can be messy.

  5. #5
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    I tried it once......could find any quantities/how many portions, but made some god awful stuff that was baked.....ate it with jam and said at the time, "how delicious", but I lied. Will try again......

  6. #6
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    Simple version:

    2/3 self-raising flower to 1/3 milk powder. A little salt, a little sugar or honey. Add water, a bit at a time, you want it fairly thick. Cook as slowly as possible in a cast iron pan if possible, over embers.

    Add bilberries, dried fruit, or whatever takes your fancy. Chocolate chips are popular with kids and adults alike.

  7. #7
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    Brilliant, thank you.....(I'll leave out the dried fruit)....but honey...........mmmmmmmm.

  8. #8
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    I use a similar recipe to Mal's - works really well.
    Fran

    Photobucket stole my sig



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fran View Post
    I use a similar recipe to Mal's - works really well.
    Funny, that, as I got it from some woman I met in a green Prospector with a kangaroo leather hat on...

  10. #10
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    I've got a Kangaroo leather hat..............and I make Bannock (now). Who knew

  11. #11
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    I was almost going to say "kindred spirits" but then I realised that none of my canoes are green.

    Anyway, back to the bannock. So, I'm guessing that the milk powder replaces the butter but works well enough?

    The thing with Bannock is that it is synonymous with Voyageurs and Canada and Canoeing. It was a staple of that era. What other food ties so clearly to Canoeing? Possibly Pemmican? Any others?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Funny, that, as I got it from some woman I met in a green Prospector with a kangaroo leather hat on...
    Fran

    Photobucket stole my sig



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobt View Post
    Any others?
    http://www.quietjourney.com/recipes/

    We enjoyed cinnamon buns baked in a reflector oven

  14. #14
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    It doesn't have to be complicated - I carry flour, salt & baking powder already mixed together. When I wanna eat, I just add water and a bit of vegetable oil (which is fine for weeks without refrigeration. I never carry butter or anything like that). I pour the mixture onto some foil which I put on top of an enamel plate & close it up so it's sort-of a Dutch oven effect. Put it on some hot rocks next to the fire. 20 minutes or so - voila.














  15. #15
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    Lovely.

    I also love that you have a photo of the waiting for it to cook.

  16. #16
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    Rotis. Flour, water, optional spicy bits. Insert optional curry, stew, hummus etc and you are away

  17. #17
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    I use the flour, salt, baking powder recipe and like sk8r, like a bit of oil or fat.
    Olive oil, along with some herbs and garlic (fresh or dried) makes for tasty. I use proper butter if at home.
    To be honest, I'm not sure if what I make is bannock; it comes out with a texture somewhere between a scon(e) and a pitta-bread !!??

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigyellowtractor View Post
    I use the flour, salt, baking powder recipe and like sk8r, like a bit of oil or fat.
    Olive oil, along with some herbs and garlic (fresh or dried) makes for tasty. I use proper butter if at home.
    To be honest, I'm not sure if what I make is bannock; it comes out with a texture somewhere between a scon(e) and a pitta-bread !!??
    Sounds like Bannock to me

  19. #19
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    Of course you could do it the way Mrs P is being shown here by a Cree lady in Fort Smith NWT. Simply make the dough and curl it around a stick and place it in the fire. Add fruit, berries and you've cake too.

    I innocently asked the lady if she'd ever done this 'for real' in the 'bush', as the wilderness is called up there. "Yes" she said, "All my life I've lived in the bush -that was my husband you were talking to", referring to the Cree gentleman I'd just been talking with about his hunting and travelling adventures across the northern forests of Canada by canoe and dog team.
    http://www.davidwperry.blogspot.co.uk/

  20. #20
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    Wrapping it around a stick is known in Scouting as dampers. For young people filling with chocolate spread works well.
    https://scouts.org.uk/news/2015/06/recipe-dampers/
    "Oh, Eeyore, you are wet!" said Piglet, feeling him.Eeyore shook himself, and asked somebody to explain to Piglet what happened when you had been inside a river for quite a long time.

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