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Thread: Hi from the Highlands

  1. #1

    Default Hi from the Highlands

    Hello everyone. My wife and I got an inflateable canoe in spring, Sevlor something or other, was quite enjoyable but never felt particularly stable. Just picked up a nice rigid moulded plastic/fibreglass? job very cheaply, looks perfect for our needs, just need a seat repair. Looking forward to getting out on the lochs with it. Have noticed places selling bouyancy aids to go in the front and rear pointy bits, are these necessary? Not sure what make or model our canoe is, will post some pics if someone may know. Cheers.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Somerset
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    3,465

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    Welcome here, you live in the right part of the country for canoeing .
    Without being pedantic, buoyancy aids are what you wear to help keep you afloat should you end up in the water.
    It's flotation blocks or bags that you mean, and if your canoe is fibreglass or any other type of composite, you will need them because the boat will sink if capsized.
    If your boat is plastic, then they are not necessary unless you're paddling white water, but they will make the boat float a bit higher in the water if you swamp it. A plastic boat will fill right up with water, but it won't sink to the bottom like a composite boat.

    Hope that helps and if you don't know what your boat is made from, tell us the make and model, or show us pictures.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by OLD MAN View Post
    Welcome here, you live in the right part of the country for canoeing .
    Without being pedantic, buoyancy aids are what you wear to help keep you afloat should you end up in the water.
    It's flotation blocks or bags that you mean, and if your canoe is fibreglass or any other type of composite, you will need them because the boat will sink if capsized.
    If your boat is plastic, then they are not necessary unless you're paddling white water, but they will make the boat float a bit higher in the water if you swamp it. A plastic boat will fill right up with water, but it won't sink to the bottom like a composite boat.

    Hope that helps and if you don't know what your boat is made from, tell us the make and model, or show us pictures.
    Thanks, I get the bouyancy aid/life jacket thing, yes it was flotation blocks I was meaning. I have some photos if anyone knows anything about make or model I'd appreciate it. How do I add photos? I get asked for URL....??

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Somerset
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    3,465

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    You need to put your photos on a photo hosting site such as Flickr before you can post them here.
    There's a tutorial somewhere here but I can never find it.
    If you decide to use Flickr though, look at this thread where it explains how to proceed.
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...=photo+hosting

    Or just tell us the make and model if you know it, someone here will know what it is.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
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    Hello and Welcome!

    What OLD MAN says, mostly.

    Flotation blocks or airbags are mostly a whitewater thing, but if you are paddling on big open water, they can help if swamped. A fibreglass/other composite canoe may have a small built in buoyancy tank at each end, but if not, it won't float when full of water. A single airbag will stop it sinking, or even a dry bag clipped to a thwart, but to float in a way that aids recovery, airbags/blocks at each end will mean the gunwhales are (just) out of the water when swamped.

    I would say, though, that experience and judgement on open water are more important than anything, particularly the ability to say "no" if the wind is rising. Above about 12-15mph winds, its hard work and on big lochs the "fetch" can mean waves get nasty quickly, especially at the downwind end. Basically, if you're out on a loch with a likelihood of being swamped, you probably shouldn't be there in the first place. Even experienced paddlers will avoid such conditions.

    You're in a lovely part of the world. May I recommend Glen Affric as a wonderful place to paddle that can be more sheltered than a lot of the highland lochs, particularly on Loch Beinn a' Mheadhoin. The loch above the Aigas damn is also remarkable and sheltered, though I believe there's work going on at the put-in that might mean its best to wait a while as parking is affected.

  6. #6

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    Thanks, Glen Affric is where we intend to go, have paddled over to the castle on Lochindorb too......spoilt for choice really

    Will see how we get on re flotation. Regarding make and model, I have no idea as there are no markings, adding pictures seems to be a bit of a nightmare...... It is green, one piece moulded, curves up at each end like a native american type and has 3 seats and a 8inch hatch hole at one end.....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Hello and Welcome!

    What OLD MAN says, mostly.

    Flotation blocks or airbags are mostly a whitewater thing, but if you are paddling on big open water, they can help if swamped. A fibreglass/other composite canoe may have a small built in buoyancy tank at each end, but if not, it won't float when full of water. A single airbag will stop it sinking, or even a dry bag clipped to a thwart, but to float in a way that aids recovery, airbags/blocks at each end will mean the gunwhales are (just) out of the water when swamped.

    I would say, though, that experience and judgement on open water are more important than anything, particularly the ability to say "no" if the wind is rising. Above about 12-15mph winds, its hard work and on big lochs the "fetch" can mean waves get nasty quickly, especially at the downwind end. Basically, if you're out on a loch with a likelihood of being swamped, you probably shouldn't be there in the first place. Even experienced paddlers will avoid such conditions.

    You're in a lovely part of the world. May I recommend Glen Affric as a wonderful place to paddle that can be more sheltered than a lot of the highland lochs, particularly on Loch Beinn a' Mheadhoin. The loch above the Aigas damn is also remarkable and sheltered, though I believe there's work going on at the put-in that might mean its best to wait a while as parking is affected.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
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    That hatch hole might well be an entrance to a built in flotation tank, hard to tell. If so, it sounds like a fibreglass canoe which already has some added bouyancy.

    You can't add photos direct, but if you host them somewhere like Flickr, you can link to them and they will show.

  8. #8

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  9. #9

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    [IMG]_DSC0721 by martinmicro43, on Flickr[/IMG][IMG]_DSC0723 by martinmicro43, on Flickr[/IMG]

  10. #10

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    I've seen another similar one in red on google images described as a Roto Canadian Canoe, that is all the info I can find.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The space behind your walls
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    342

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    Yip! for me its definitely a roto sport ,,link here http://roto-group.co.uk/, but it could be another make using the same type generic mould ,, you might be able to get a hatch cover for your canoe from roto if you ask nicely

  12. #12

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    Thank you very much

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Avoch, Black Isle
    Posts
    78

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    Hi Martin,
    Came back on here after a long absence. Not far from you, so may be worth hooking up...if you don't mind squealing kids that is! Planning on mostly boating with my children. I won't take it badly if you turn that down- for many canoeing is about peace and quiet!

  14. #14

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    Sure, happy to hook up, I have a squealing wife and two pain in the arse terriers, so peace is something I am unaware of

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