Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Cam Loch and Loch Veyatie advice please

  1. #1

    Default Cam Loch and Loch Veyatie advice please

    Hi

    Our introduction to canoeing continues. ( see previous posts) So with a grand total of 10 days experience in the last 30 years :-) ( couple of days on the great glen, couple of days on Loch Maree, a week on the Dordogne)we are aiming for a 4 day trip in a couple of weeks time wild camping on the shores. The plan as it is now is to launch into Cam Loch ( near elphin) at the Ledmore river middayish and spend that afternoon on Cam loch and camp overnight, spend the morning paddling back down it and do the portage into Loch Veyatie, couple of days on loch veyatie then paddle and portage back to cam loch and back to the river for pick up. We will be using a hire company to get us and a boat to the loch.
    Aim is to have a gentle paddle around in the wilderness. Its going to be more about exploring and nosing around, sitting looking at the scenery, less about travelling somewhere.
    We are in our late 50s now and although newbs for canoeing we have spent a lot of time walking and wild camping in the highlands
    So questions:
    1: How bad is the portage between Cam loch and Loch Veyatie? ie half an hour of walking with the boat or 3 hours dragging the boat thru swamps? ;-) My other halfs tolerance for taking a canoe for a walk will be very low.
    2: We will have two short half days and two full days on the water. I am guessing we can see most of both lochs in that time. Does this seem reasonable? Again I emphasise we want this to be relaxed and gentle not 12 hours a day paddling hard!
    3: Would we be better on the return getting out of loch Veyatie at the fish farm and going up the track or doing the portage back to Cam loch and getting out at the Ledmore river?
    Anything in particular we shroud avoid or must not miss on these two lochs?
    Ta for your help. You guys have been very helpful and useful for us

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    21,182

    Default

    Hi

    My thoughts having done this bit:

    1. Portage is fairly short at about 400m, with a path, but its quite rough. You get out river right well above the falls, follow the path, with a couple of awkward steps, to a footbridge, cross that then carry on down to the fish farm. It can be boggy. If you've never portaged in this sort of terrain, you won't find it easy, and will need to take care, but its all part of the adventure and perfectly possible. Treat it as part of the fun, and take your time. If you're doing say 1 trip with the canoe and 2 trips with the bags, maybe an hour?

    2. Plenty of time for a reasonable explore of the lochs. Both are beautiful. However, these are open Scottish lochs so "relaxed and gentle" will depend entirely upon the weather, particularly the wind. If its more than 10 miles an hour, it may be anything but gentle! Often, early morning and evening see lighter winds, it can be good to paddle then.

    3. On our return, we walked up from the fish farm rather than repeat the portage. On that occasion, we were able to fetch our cars and take them right down to the water, but this is not a given and the gate is sometimes locked I believe, so I'd view that as a bonus. If you have a trolley, using that up and down the fish farm track would be significantly easier than the portage around the falls. It would miss some of the feeling of an adventurous trip though.

    There are some good camping spots on Cam Loch, at the far end and also on the north side. On Veyatie, the best are probably at the far end, around Loch a Mhadail.


    This is a truly special part of the world, definitely worth a visit, but you do need to be aware of the challenges of travelling in this sort of environment. Sometimes its so easy, calm and utterly stunning, but it can change very quickly. I'd say look at the forecast, and if its for strong winds, go somewhere a little more sheltered but if not, go for it!

    Our blog of the trip, plus our portages beyond and onto Sionasgaig, is here: http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...-of-Inverpolly Cam Loch to Veyatie is only a few photos in.
    Last edited by Mal Grey; 6th-August-2018 at 09:36 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Hi Teej, I did a trip there last year. The portage from Cam Loch is downhill so fairly straightforward. Probably took me an hour, on my own, from water to water. It’s a lot easier to get out using the fish farm track. There’s a gate which may or may not be open. If you have a trolley it would be useful.

    There is a nice beach for camping at the far end of Cam Loch. The only thing that could make it an epic is the wind, but hopefully it will be behind you on the way back!

    It’s a nice area. Enjoy.

    Mike

  4. #4

    Default

    Ta chaps
    Given our trip on Loch Maree last year turned into an epic with headwinds all the way I do now have a bit of understanding of how the wind affects a canoe!
    We own neither a car or a boat so will be using a hire company to get us to the water.
    What do you guys use as footwear? Previous trips I have used my hiking boots for warmth and waterproofness but this made it difficult to get my feet under the seat to kneel to paddle. It would be nice to keep dry feet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    137

    Default

    I used to wear old wellies for this sort of thing. I’m now more sophisticated and use 5.10 canyoneering boots and dry trousers if it’s not too hot. Watersports sandals are my hot weather alternative with boots packed close to hand for portage wear. I had a lot of ticks there last year...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    21,182

    Default

    Either neoprenre kayak shoes or Teva water shoes when paddling, with walking boots for the longer or rougher portages, like this one! Decent wellies/Muckboots would work for this one if you have something with a decent grippy sole.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    St. Helens
    Posts
    451

    Default

    I personally prefer some lightweight walking boots and seal skin socks to back them up for waterproofness.
    The pair I used for Sweden last year where fell running boots, they had a lot of stick but gave me the support I needed over rough portages and I was still comfortable to paddle in them.

    They toke some cosmetic damage, but are still sound and im still using them now.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •