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Thread: A History of Canada in Ten Maps - Adam Shoalts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    Default A History of Canada in Ten Maps - Adam Shoalts

    Shoalts is a modern day explorer and his 1st book "Alone Against the North" is an intersting read in its own right.

    This book starts with the Vikings and ends with John Franklin's overland Arctic expedition. It takes us through the times of Champlain, Peter Pond, Samuel Hearne, Alexander Mackenzie and David Thompson and deals with the brief history of each and how they mapped what became the modern Canada. It is a fascinating book if you like history, exploration and adventure and it certainly filled in many of the gaps in my own knowledge of how Canada was developed.

    Shoalts is not a historian but I am confident that the historical accounts are accurate. There is a very detailed account of a battle between the Americans and the Canadians (British) in the war of 1812 which reveals a significant level of animosity between the two countries which seems largely to have been forgotten in modern times (although Donald Trump might be trying to re-visit it).

    What the book has done for me is whet my appetite for more detailed investigation into each of the periods mentioned but it is a very good read in its own right.

  2. #2
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    Jul 2008
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    Sounds interesting, especially the maps bit! I do like a map...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Sounds interesting, especially the maps bit! I do like a map...
    Each individual story was utterly fascinating. The idea of discovering a land with no concept of its size. I'd known that Vikings were the 1st Europeans but hadn't know how or why they came and went. I'd known about Champlain and his allegiance with the Huron (Wendat) but not fully understood why the Iroquois hated him. And then there's Peter Pond whose name adorns the maps of Saskatchewan but whose history was unknown to me. And, of course, there is an intimate connection to the canoe throughout the book.

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