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Thread: Is it just me?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    Default Is it just me?

    Having been thwarted in my original plan for today, number 2 grandson not having appeared back home this morning, I decided to go and do another section of the Lancaster canal. Is it just me, or because I paddle alone or just because I'm inexperienced, but does anybody else find paddling a canoe on a canal in pretty much any kind of wind a complete pain the paddle. The wind never seems to blow consistently, well actually it does it always blows into my face whichever way I'm paddling. Oh yes and the venturi effect under bridges seems to have been designed specifically to annoy me....or am I just a wimp?
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Glasgow
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    Wind in the face is not just you, i suffer that too. Doesnt matter if im kayaking or cycling, i can do circular routes and have a headwind the full time.

  3. #3
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    Its one of the joys of paddling. Like cycling, the wind is always in your face, even if you've just paddled for 2 hours into it, and now turn round to go the opposite direction to get back.

    You do get used to it, and the various tricks to help counter it; weighted bags as trim, sliced paddle recovery after the stroke, which means you can counter the wind as the paddle moves back forwards, hugging the banks, etc, etc. If its REALLY windy, I have even been known to bin the J-stroke/C-stroke/Indian stroke and change to switching sides every 3-5 strokes. Less time on steering then.

    Apparently some folk even resort to double bladed paddles. Any why not. Though I haven't yet been able to face that ignominy.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2016
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    Ah, trim. I didn’t have my usual huge bag in the bow as I was only out for a couple if hours. That would have made a difference. Don’t feel quite such a numpty now. Indian stroke is my default as I’m always trying to creep up on wildlife to photograph it but it really doesn’t cut it in those types of conditions and yesterday I was switching sides because it was really the quickest way to make fast corrections. Ikm not going to buy a double blade! If I was going to do that I’d have bought a kayak. Aaaargh LOL. I guess I could have switched and tried paddling from the bow too. Thanks very much for your responses.
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Somerset
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    If you have the pennies, try a bent shaft paddle - it doesn't have to be an expensive one.
    They are easier to use for short, faster strokes, so your paddle is in the water more, meaning you lose less momentum between strokes.
    They are also easier to switch sides with.

    Regardless of what others say, there's no shame in using a double paddle if that's what it takes to make your task easier. It's okay being a traditionalist, but getting home is far more important .
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  6. #6
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    Thanks Old Man, that's a strategy I hadn't thought of. I might look in to that.
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graywolf View Post
    Thanks Old Man, that's a strategy I hadn't thought of. I might look in to that.

    You're welcome
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  8. #8
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    Jan 2011
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    S-o-T, U.K.
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    Trim can make quite a difference, if you are paddling into the wind it's good to be bow heavy then the wind weathercocks your canoe in the right direction, if you are paddling with the wind bow light is good for the same reason. The trouble with paddling canals is you may be subjected to side winds and the winds can funnel near bridges and locks ... so a good average may be to aim for neutral trim and you'll need a little more control to stay on course ... or shift the weight about in your canoe to make paddling easier. It's not just you ... it's all of us ... but it does get better with practice, experience, tagging into group SotP paddles, joining a local club (with a strong canoeing section), getting some coaching, whatever floats your canoe

    Bent shaft paddles ... one of my bow paddlers reckoned I was getting about 20% more forward power by using one ... he may be right That means I can go ~20% faster, or go at the same speed with a fair bit less effort, either of which I like , steering with a bent shaft can become interesting depending on how you like to paddle ... they are really designed for sit-and-switch or for bow paddler power ... but are more than do-able for solo trad paddling too.

    Keep playing and find out what works for you. I used my sea kayaking split paddle, in my canoe on my 4* Assessment, if they are taken as spares for others they might need to be used and very effective they are (in a canoe) too.
    Last edited by Potty Paddler; 9th-July-2018 at 09:31 PM.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    suffolk
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Its one of the joys of paddling. Like cycling, the wind is always in your face, even if you've just paddled for 2 hours into it, and now turn round to go the opposite direction to get back.

    You do get used to it, and the various tricks to help counter it; weighted bags as trim, sliced paddle recovery after the stroke, which means you can counter the wind as the paddle moves back forwards, hugging the banks, etc, etc. If its REALLY windy, I have even been known to bin the J-stroke/C-stroke/Indian stroke and change to switching sides every 3-5 strokes. Less time on steering then.

    Apparently some folk even resort to double bladed paddles. Any why not. Though I haven't yet been able to face that ignominy.

    Absolutely...….
    Sometimes I find in narrow streams or if you're going upstream and windy (my car doesn't drive it self...I have to get it!) paddling both sides is essential to keep the power on against the wind or stream?

  10. #10
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    Mar 2016
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    suffolk
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trig View Post
    Wind in the face is not just you, i suffer that too. Doesnt matter if im kayaking or cycling, i can do circular routes and have a headwind the full time.
    Same with sailing...where ever you want to go!!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lancaster
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    215

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    Definitely not just you! I think it worse on a canal (albeit inherently more sheltered) as the width of the waterway demands that you can only really go two directions... into the wind on the way there... and into the wind on the way back (the wind deciding to change direction at the same time you stop to admire the view/have a brew.

    On a lake we can learn something from sailors and go "close hauled" - using the wind on one side to counteract our paddle on the other so we don't have to do a corrective stroke. I stronger winds it is even possible to "sail" (without a sail) by doing a pry on the downwind side and angling the paddle... not really an effective way to travel as it is too inefficient but fun to play with non-the-less!

    Personally I think having a 50/50 paddling/sailing canoe the perfect solution as it increases the time you can have on the water if you were only one discipline: sail up for the times that it is too windy to (enjoyably) paddle and sail down for the times that the winds are too light to sail.

  12. #12
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    Feb 2011
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    Devon ..just up from the bottom and right a bit.
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    I was out on the sea today ... although there was a prevailing wind dWNW... Due to the coastline, cliffs and valleys etc it was all over the shop!

  13. #13
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    Mar 2016
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    suffolk
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    So was I!! ...but sailing, on the east coast....

  14. #14
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    May 2010
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    There's a sea kayak variant to this rule:

    1. Whichever way you go, the wind will be against you
    2. Whichever way you go, the tide will be against you
    3. Notwithstanding rules 1 & 2, the wind will be against the tide!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    P m l
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!

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