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Thread: Just a quickie

  1. #1
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    Default Just a quickie

    I don't want to hijack the paddle thread http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...707#post658707

    So a quick question.... there is talk of deepwater paddles.

    Do we mean deep lakes etc or will a 10 - 12 foot deep river count.....

    At the moment i have these

  2. #2
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    Oh here we go again..... pictures ... Grrrr..

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Last edited by Alan...; 27th-June-2018 at 07:45 PM. Reason: photo

  3. #3
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    Not sure I understand the question exactly, but to me, a deepwater paddle is one that can be used in water deep enough for a deepwater paddle Sensible answer, its really a term just differentiating it from moving water and shallow water, so deep probably means anything from just less than canal depth and deeper I guess.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan... View Post
    Oh here we go again..... pictures ... Grrrr..

    [IMG][/IMG]


    I'd call those "all rounders". Shorter but fairly wide blades that will work on both shallower water and moving water, without being whitewater specific.

  5. #5
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    By the way, I have no idea why the image appears in my "quoted" reply but not in your original!


    Edit: Ah, now they appear in both!

  6. #6
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    That makes sense not even sure i understand my own question now i have read it. wasnt sure if the ootertails etc were mainly for cruising the deep lakes etc....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan... View Post
    That makes sense not even sure i understand my own question now i have read it. wasnt sure if the ootertails etc were mainly for cruising the deep lakes etc....
    Well, they are, in a way, as they will have been designed originally for the lake sections on a Canadian cross-country route, between portages and rivers. However, as long as the water is deep enough, you will have the same advantages (smooth paddling, less impact on joints, loads of "feel" and subtlety, less tiring) and disadvantages (less ultimate power, hit the bottom as you get close to shore) on a canal as you would on a bigger lake.

    I love an ottertail, especially for solo paddling in a heeled canoe. Its all about the feel, the sliced recoveries, and the ability to paddle without strain for longer periods. If I can use one, it will be my first choice except on moving water. However, I also love a big powerful blade on occasion too, especially when the waves kick up on a big loch and you want to get the heck out of there quickly!

  8. #8
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    Soooo much to learn......

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    However, I also love a big powerful blade on occasion too, especially when the waves kick up on a big loch and you want to get the heck out of there quickly!
    Although more recently I've been reaching for a smaller blade in similar conditions so I can up the stroke rate and change to a switching technique.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkwheel View Post
    Although more recently I've been reaching for a smaller blade in similar conditions so I can up the stroke rate and change to a switching technique.
    This is very true. I increasingly enjoyed the demo Dipper (small beaver tail-ish), rather than the Big Dipper, for day to day work. The higher cadence, even when J-stroking, means I'm definitely less tired, and I'm pretty sure I'm actually going a bit faster than with the Lapwing (ottertail type).

  11. #11

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    I think deep water is simply a depth deep enough to use the paddle without hitting the bottom. An ottertail has more area higher up the blade. So if the water is shallow this is not used and you do not get much power from the smaller lower part of the blade in shallow water. Personally my go to paddle is an ottertail simply because I love the shape and feel of it,

    Sent from my SM-T813 using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Perhaps we have turned this on its head, prhaps there are actually normal paddles, and shallow water paddles?

    I.e. all the so called deep water paddles are really for every day use, and it is the short wide varieties for paddling shallow rivers that are actually the specialties?

    How hard can it be?

  13. #13
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    Fair point, I use a deep water paddle far more than a shallow one.


    Mind you, if you turn on to your head, make sure you're wearing the helmet if its shallow water...

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