Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Touring paddle advice - Redtail or Grey Owl

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    NE Scotland
    Posts
    40

    Default Touring paddle advice - Redtail or Grey Owl

    Hi All - I have a wee bit of spare cash so I'm looking at treating myself to a deep water touring orientated paddle for this summers trips.

    I fancy an otter tail and am quite keen on a Redtail but I'm not sure about the 'euro grip' - has anyone got experience of these grips any pro's or con's., it kinda looks like it would make J-stroke more awkward???

    Alternatively I could stretch to a Grey Owl Northern Light (I've been using a Voyageur that I'm really happy with). There are another couple of Grey Owls that might fit the bill (Sagamore) but I particularly like the all round epoxy on the Northern Light.

    I'll be tandem paddling a laden 16 footer in large lochs.

    P.S. I'm in the stern.

    Ta,

    phil
    Last edited by son goku; 26th-June-2018 at 06:44 PM. Reason: added stern paddler comment!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Teynham Kent
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Not used the euro grip, it's an interesting idea if it reduces strain but it will restrict how you use the paddle.
    Have a look at Edenwood paddles for British hand made deep water paddles. http://edenwoodpaddles.co.uk

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Central Scotland
    Posts
    4,336
    Journal Entries
    14

    Default

    Like any paddle you need to get used to it before it feels right. I have used a Redtail extensively, as per this thread. I liked it but I like the GO too but not one as much. I like the euro grip has no impact on the Jstroke for me.

    HTH
    Cheers,

    Alan


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Bangor, Co Down.
    Posts
    4,488

    Default

    The euro grip gets on my wick because you can't do the Indian stroke with it.
    I have both paddles you mention and like them both. But the red tail gets used more by my bow paddlers. I use the grey owl in the back or on my own.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Bangor, Co Down.
    Posts
    4,488

    Default

    Oops double post. Delete this one.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Lancaster
    Posts
    191

    Default

    Agree with big Al: the euro grip has no bearing on the j-stroke but it is quite bothersome for the Indian.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    NE Scotland
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Thanks guys, think that's decision made as I wrote 'J-stroke' in my original post but actually meant Indian stroke so if the euro-grip is dodgy for the Indian the Redtail is out the window!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Spalding , Lincs
    Posts
    35

    Default

    And now I have got to go and look up Indian stroke and a European grip.... my J stroke is ok but it's playing hell with my tennis elbow. I Think my next paddle ought to an electric one lol

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Teynham Kent
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan... View Post
    And now I have got to go and look up Indian stroke and a European grip.... my J stroke is ok but it's playing hell with my tennis elbow. I Think my next paddle ought to an electric one lol
    Hi Alan, without knowing anything about how you hold the paddle.
    Try moving your top hand over the grip so your hand is more like 1 or 2 o'clock rather than 12. This can lesson the tension in the wrist and elbow. reducing strain and pain.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    21,066

    Default

    I guess if you're only paddling tandem in the stern, the Eurogrip makes more sense, as you're probably less likely to do lots of Indian Stroke. However, as an all rounder, a "normal" grip would seem to me to keep your options open the most.

    As mentioned, Edenwood do some lovely Ottertails. As did Downcreek, but alas, no more.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Hebrides
    Posts
    3,224

    Default

    Just a thought, what blade is your bow paddler using?

    I don't paddle tandem often but one thing I noticed when I did was that the bow paddlers blade effected what I chose to use in the stern. If the bow paddler was using one of my more powerful blades then the slim deep water paddle was no match, which meant I was forever having to paddle harder or correct more often. I ended up having to use my biggest and most powerful blade and the bow paddler had the smaller or slimmer one.

    This all maybe just my inexperience as I am not, as noted above, a regular tandem paddler but hopefully the more experienced will tell you if I am talking rubbish.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Spalding , Lincs
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Thanks.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Wirral
    Posts
    722

    Default

    My wife uses a Grey Owl Sagamore and likes it. She wouldn’t let me buy her an Edenwood as she doesn’t paddle often enough. I agree with the point about balancing paddles. I can only use my Edenwood Ottertail when Jax uses her Sagamore.

    The GO is a good mid priced paddle I reckon, but if you can stretch to the Edenwood it’s worth it.
    "I'd far rather be happy than right any day"..........Slartibartfast

    http://apachecanoes.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    NE Scotland
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
    Just a thought, what blade is your bow paddler using?

    I don't paddle tandem often but one thing I noticed when I did was that the bow paddlers blade effected what I chose to use in the stern. If the bow paddler was using one of my more powerful blades then the slim deep water paddle was no match, which meant I was forever having to paddle harder or correct more often. I ended up having to use my biggest and most powerful blade and the bow paddler had the smaller or slimmer one.

    This all maybe just my inexperience as I am not, as noted above, a regular tandem paddler but hopefully the more experienced will tell you if I am talking rubbish.
    This did cross my mind and was actually part of why I'm considering an otter tail. At the moment we both use the Grey Owl Voyageurs and typically I'll need to add a bit of 'rudder' around every 3rd stroke as I'll tend to out-paddle the missus. I figured changing paddle might actually help to reduce the amount of corrections I'm making and make the experience more optimal - seemed logical anyway and hence a good excuse to buy a new paddle. While it's not just about surface area I note the Northern Light is only about 7% smaller than the Voyageur so I wasn't sure the difference would be that pronounced. I also intend using my Voyageur as my spare as there will always be shallow bits and should I need to get a bit of power on in adverse conditions.
    Last edited by son goku; 27th-June-2018 at 08:57 AM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Wirral
    Posts
    722

    Default

    The effect you describe of having to make occasional correction strokes is normal as the stern paddler will always have a greater influence on the direction of travel. The key difference you will notice with a good ottertail is in the tiredness, or lack of, in your muscles and tendons at the end of the day.

    The power up is more gentle hence less jarring. Also the recovery through the water will be smoother and easier without the vibrations you often get with wide bladed or poorly shaped paddles.

    The best way to justify a better paddle is to buy one for your wife too, then she will instantly feel the difference and be glad you bought it.
    "I'd far rather be happy than right any day"..........Slartibartfast

    http://apachecanoes.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    NE Scotland
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Okay so possibly a more contentious question what makes the Edenwood better than the Grey Owl? Price-wise there's not a great deal of difference between the GO Northern Light and an Edenwood Otter tail (tho' I can the GO for a bit less than RRP), and there's also an undefined wait as the Edenwood site states paddles are made to order.


    I can appreciate that the Edenwood is hand made and may be aesthetically more pleasing but is there more pragmatic benefits (and I note the GO is a fair bit lighter)?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Wirral
    Posts
    722

    Default

    I can only comment on the differences between the GO Sagamore and the Edenwood Ottertail. The grip is more comfortable being “football” shaped and the finish is significantly better. Both important over a full day paddling, ie no blisters.

    Next the profile of the blade is better shaped to ensure effortless power stroke and silent recovery. Most important for your Indian stroke. Of course it can also be made with a shaft length to your precise specification as opposed to the nearest 2”.

    Weight is not an issue, whatever the stated difference.
    "I'd far rather be happy than right any day"..........Slartibartfast

    http://apachecanoes.com

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Central Scotland
    Posts
    4,336
    Journal Entries
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al. View Post
    The euro grip gets on my wick because you can't do the Indian stroke with it.
    I have both paddles you mention and like them both. But the red tail gets used more by my bow paddlers. I use the grey owl in the back or on my own.
    I don't really have a problem with the indian stroke with my redtail (or my homemade one) My 'grip' on the top of the paddle tends to be very light in fact I barely close my fingers at all just use the palm of my hand with a little bit of grip in case something moves out of alignment. Of course your mileage may vary. I don't tend to use the indian stroke very much just when I am bored and want to play or on the rare occasion I want to sneak up on something. Must think about it more next time I'm out.
    Cheers,

    Alan


  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Bangor, Co Down.
    Posts
    4,488

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chainsaw View Post
    I don't really have a problem with the indian stroke with my redtail (or my homemade one) My 'grip' on the top of the paddle tends to be very light in fact I barely close my fingers at all just use the palm of my hand with a little bit of grip in case something moves out of alignment. Of course your mileage may vary. I don't tend to use the indian stroke very much just when I am bored and want to play or on the rare occasion I want to sneak up on something. Must think about it more next time I'm out.
    I use the Indian stroke a fair bit, often in wind when I can use the forward stroke to correct drift. The annoying bit is that the ergo grip ends up back to front after you slice it forward.

    As Mal says, the ordinary grip gives you a more versatile paddle to play with.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    NE Scotland
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MultiMark View Post
    I can only comment on the differences between the GO Sagamore and the Edenwood Ottertail. The grip is more comfortable being “football” shaped and the finish is significantly better. Both important over a full day paddling, ie no blisters.

    Next the profile of the blade is better shaped to ensure effortless power stroke and silent recovery. Most important for your Indian stroke. Of course it can also be made with a shaft length to your precise specification as opposed to the nearest 2”.

    Weight is not an issue, whatever the stated difference.
    Okay, you talked me into it email sent to Edenwood yesterday...

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Wirral
    Posts
    722

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by son goku View Post
    Okay, you talked me into it email sent to Edenwood yesterday...
    You're gonna love it
    "I'd far rather be happy than right any day"..........Slartibartfast

    http://apachecanoes.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •