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Thread: Central air bags

  1. #1

    Default Central air bags

    Hi , My wife and I are heading up to Scotland for a bit of sea loch action , namely Loch Sunart and Moidart. As we maybe on our own , I am thinking of adding a central airbag to our existing front and rear . The boat is laced , so attaching shouldn't be a problem . The only off the shelf bags I can find are from Yak , a 50x55cm or 70x110, I think palm have stopped making them .Its going to be day trips in our 16ft prospector, so not too much gear .Intersted in peoples experience and opinions , Alastair

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Surrey
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    20,834

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    Hey

    Unless you're thinking about doing this regularly, when side air bags might be a possibly better option, I wouldn't bother. If the conditions are such that taking on water or a spill are likely, you probably won't be on the water anyway. Keep close to the shore in anything but gentle stuff.

    Moidart is pretty sheltered, and very lovely. Explore the islands, see if you can find our Pirate camp and Poo Island . Sunart I don't know.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Wantage, United Kingdom
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    29

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    I bought a yak central airbag for similar reasons. The first snag I came across however is the vast amount of air needed to inflate it - pitiful I know but I was in a rush to be on the water and gave up in the end.

    Might be sea tripping next weekend and may give it another go.

    Andrew


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Bucks
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    6,779

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    I have a plastic pump which is 12V from the car. It will inflate an airbag in about 30 seconds and can be bought for a few quid at Halfords.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Wantage, United Kingdom
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    Must give something like that a try for next weekend.

    Thanks


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for the replies

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Cumbria
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    1,571

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    I sometimes jam a "peanut" shaped yoga ball under the front seat or central thwart for bigger white water. Works well. Shove it in partially inflated them pump it up.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Just a little to the right of the Shire
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    Moidart as Mal says is sheltered, Sunart is also sheltered but not to the same degree.
    The main thing to consider is; if you feel you need big airbags to prevent swamping on open water you shouldn't be out there.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Almeria, Spain
    Posts
    70

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Moidart as Mal says is sheltered, Sunart is also sheltered but not to the same degree.
    The main thing to consider is; if you feel you need big airbags to prevent swamping on open water you shouldn't be out there.
    That is a little harsh, Tim.

    No shame in a belt and braces approach to safety if it boosts confidence in what may be a person's first open water outing - especially if without the backup of another craft. Conditions can change alarmingly quickly on open water, as I'm sure you know.

    Regards,
    Nick

    Neris Valkure - 1. Folding kayak.
    Gumotex Twist N 1. Inflatable kayak.

    http://nickayaker.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick TQP View Post
    That is a little harsh, Tim.


    http://nickayaker.blogspot.com
    TBH, it was not meant to be harsh and I apologise if that is the way it came across, I know can be blunt at times.

    So back to the OP.

    Regarding advice on open water paddling, if there are whitecaps on top of steep waves - my advice would be to don't go out there, if you are out and the waves start to become more aggressive; land or hug a sheltered coast line where the waves are manageable.

    Instead of a big air bag I would suggest carrying a "bug out bag" to enable you to sit out a storm if needs be.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Almeria, Spain
    Posts
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    I'll second the carrying of a 'bug out bag'. When using my folding kayak I'm always on the water on my own, mostly in areas where few people ever go, and I always carry one. In my case I call it my 'what if' bag. With the contents of that bag I can always be dry, warm and safe - can sit-out storms if necessary and and walk out to the nearest civilisation if I have to. Haven't yet needed to use it - but it's reassuring having it along with me.

    Regards,
    Nick

    Neris Valkure - 1. Folding kayak.
    Gumotex Twist N 1. Inflatable kayak.

    http://nickayaker.blogspot.com

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