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Thread: Canoe barrel/Bag equipment.

  1. #1

    Default Canoe barrel/Bag equipment.

    Hi all

    I'm looking at getting a barrel set up/packed generically for when I go out canoeing, either with a friend (2 solo canoes) for a day or longer expedition (Normally a week) or when we take out our Scouts/Explorers or families etc for the same.

    I'd like to have it set up more generically so that no matter what I'm doing I know what is in it, I know that some bits may be location/group specific but I can adapt and adjust over time but any recommendations for a starting point would be great.

    I'm not sure if this has been covered else where in another post (if so please point it out) but just wondering what people put in there canoe barrels/bags for when out on the water.
    Best Wishes.
    ScoutingSteve

  2. #2
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    I normally have 2 bags. 1 bag that I hope I never have to open. First Aid kit, spare clothes, extra jacket, hat, gloves, towel, survival bag, tarp, some firelighting stuff, bug spray, repair kit, duct tape, multitool etc. Months go by and I never open it. My other bag has my food, water, brew kit, stoves, toys to play with when out and about etc. and this one is the only one that leaves the boat, gets opened and restocked every trip.

    When doing rivers, I take another bag which gets stocked according to type of river, distance from civilization, who I'm paddling with etc. FAK, clothes, sandwiches, hot drink, folding saw, repair kit, bits of a pin kit etc.
    Cheers,

    Alan


  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chainsaw View Post
    I normally have 2 bags. 1 bag that I hope I never have to open. First Aid kit, spare clothes, extra jacket, hat, gloves, towel, survival bag, tarp, some firelighting stuff, bug spray, repair kit, duct tape, multitool etc. Months go by and I never open it. My other bag has my food, water, brew kit, stoves, toys to play with when out and about etc. and this one is the only one that leaves the boat, gets opened and restocked every trip.

    When doing rivers, I take another bag which gets stocked according to type of river, distance from civilization, who I'm paddling with etc. FAK, clothes, sandwiches, hot drink, folding saw, repair kit, bits of a pin kit etc.
    Thank you. Some of the ideas of the route I was looking to go down so glad that I'm looking on the right track.
    Best Wishes.
    ScoutingSteve

  4. #4
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    You've made an assumption there that I'm on the right track.... Plenty people go out there with just a paddle, a smile and a roll of duct tape. I'm (more than) a bit on the risk averse side of the line and I mainly canoe solo. Don't think there is any right answer here just whatever makes you comfortable. If you've others you are supposed to be looking after then that puts a very different shine on things.
    Cheers,

    Alan


  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chainsaw View Post
    You've made an assumption there that I'm on the right track.... Plenty people go out there with just a paddle, a smile and a roll of duct tape. I'm (more than) a bit on the risk averse side of the line and I mainly canoe solo. Don't think there is any right answer here just whatever makes you comfortable. If you've others you are supposed to be looking after then that puts a very different shine on things.
    That is always the risk but I would also rather try and be prepared as much as I can, and yes being responsible for others puts a lot more onto your planning and being prepared. You hope that you never need some of it but I would rather have it and not need it rather than need it and not have it however that being said we can not account for every eventuality so it's about striking the right balance from how I see it. It's always good to get other peoples opinions as well.
    Best Wishes.
    ScoutingSteve

  6. #6

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    Far too much stuff!

    The drybag is easy - it just contains spare clothes and towels.
    The barrel on the other hand is full of useful stuff....

    DD Tarp
    Folding saw
    Hatchet
    Floating mobile phone case
    Sporks
    Beakers
    Gas burner
    Folding Heat shield
    Lighter with some duck tape wrapped around it
    Vango cook kit (for two people)
    OR larger pan (for three-four)
    Enamel plate
    Spare gas
    2 Tea-towels
    Survival bags (useful to sit on, if nothing else)
    Compass & Whistle (yes, I was an assistant scout leader for a while)
    Waterproof map case
    OS Map
    Head torches / Spare torches
    First Aid Kit
    Penknife
    Neoprene Gloves
    A couple of spare carabiner clips
    Pen and pad

    I'm sure there's more in there, but if I unpack it will take me ages to get it all back in.
    Last edited by Fiddlesticks; 7th-May-2018 at 06:36 PM.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiddlesticks View Post
    Far too much stuff!

    The drybag is easy - it just contains spare clothes and towels.
    The barrel on the other hand is full of useful stuff....

    DD Tarp
    Folding saw
    Hatchet
    Floating mobile phone case
    Sporks
    Beakers
    Gas burner
    Folding Heat shield
    Lighter with some duck tape wrapped around it
    Vango cook kit (for two people)
    OR larger pan (for three-four)
    Enamel plate
    Spare gas
    2 Tea-towels
    Survival bags (useful to sit on, if nothing else)
    Compass & Whistle (yes, I was an assistant scout leader for a while)
    Waterproof map case
    OS Map
    Head torches / Spare torches
    First Aid Kit
    Penknife
    Neoprene Gloves
    A couple of spare carabiner clips
    Pen and pad

    I'm sure there's more in there, but if I unpack it will take me ages to get it all back in.
    Hi.

    That is certainly a comprehensive list thank you for sharing.
    Best Wishes.
    ScoutingSteve

  8. #8
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    Worth considering what you might carry in your PFD in case you got separated from your boat when somewhere remote
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mayobren View Post
    Worth considering what you might carry in your PFD in case you got separated from your boat when somewhere remote
    I fully agree. So far I carry a rescue knife, emergency whistle and a tape.
    Best Wishes.
    ScoutingSteve

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScoutingSteve View Post
    Hi all

    I'm looking at getting a barrel set up/packed generically for when I go out canoeing, either with a friend (2 solo canoes) for a day or longer expedition (Normally a week) or when we take out our Scouts/Explorers or families etc for the same.

    I'd like to have it set up more generically so that no matter what I'm doing I know what is in it, I know that some bits may be location/group specific but I can adapt and adjust over time but any recommendations for a starting point would be great.

    I'm not sure if this has been covered else where in another post (if so please point it out) but just wondering what people put in there canoe barrels/bags for when out on the water.
    Hello Scouting Steve, We use our canoe barrel as our kitchen only, so it holds mostly food, pots, cups dishes etc. We are able to carry enough food for two (hungry) people for a 7 day canoe trip in a 30 litre barrel. If you want to see what we pack, and how we pack it, please check out this video we made:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfBI-2INx9U

    Hope that helps.
    Cheers
    -Wayne

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mayobren View Post
    Worth considering what you might carry in your PFD in case you got separated from your boat when somewhere remote
    Ice cream money. I always have this in my BA in Sterling and Euros.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    Ice cream money. I always have this in my BA in Sterling and Euros.
    An excellent policy
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

  13. #13
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    This is something i've not really considered. The list can be endless. Thanks for the info.

    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    Ice cream money. I always have this in my BA in Sterling and Euros.
    Adrian, only sterling and Euro's? not Gold Sovereigns in case you end up somewhere foreign
    Last edited by Simms; 10th-May-2018 at 12:54 AM.
    Simms ..

  14. #14
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    We all have our list of must take equipment, but what we really need to consider is risk. What situations are you likely to encounter, and what equipment do they require. You are not going to meet bears in England unlike Canada, so you will not need a firearm, but even in Canada what is the actual risk of a bear encounter where you are going? Day tripping needs only spare clothes, food and drink, means of communication in case of emergency. Longer trips require more equipment such as tents and sleeping bags and cooking gear. It is very easy to go out festooned in kit to meet every situation, but what will you actually use on the day, and what will you use if it all goes pear shaped? If the canoe is carrying the weight you can go quite heavily equipped but will all that stuff be used? With time you will pare down what you use and what you might find a need for and arrive at your ideal basic kit, and your heavy kit for longer expeditions.
    Calefactio orbis? Culus meus!!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    Ice cream money. I always have this in my BA in Sterling and Euros.
    Sterling is easier now we have funny plastic notes :-)

  16. Default

    As a new canoe paddler just starting out this thread has been mighty helpful! Keep the tips coming


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Love a lot trust a few but always paddle your own canoe

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rimfire View Post
    We all have our list of must take equipment, but what we really need to consider is risk. What situations are you likely to encounter, and what equipment do they require... It is very easy to go out festooned in kit to meet every situation, but what will you actually use on the day, and what will you use if it all goes pear shaped?
    Absolutely! We all have different risk tolerances, and so will come to different conclusions, but especially as a beginner it is easy to get carried away with what you 'should' take with you. My typical load for a sheltered water solo day trip in good weather (i.e. 'low risk') is a dry bag with car keys, wallet and phone in it. I may have some food and drink in there too depending on the duration of the trip and local facilities.
    Additional hazards see extra kit added as appropriate, but the solution isn't always more equipment. I could invest in a self-inflating lifejacket and always wear it and a helmet when portaging round locks, just in case I fall in and bash my head, but the more effective risk mitigator is to take care to stand away from the edge of the lock!

  18. #18
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    I agree entirely. Consider what safety gear you take when you cross the road. What about when you walk the dog, stout shoes, a jacket if it looks cloudy maybe a location device (mobile phone). Just because you are out in a boat doesn't mean you have to escalate these precautions beyond all reason or to carry out some long winded risk assessment, it's not like you are going into the wilds (maybe you are).

  19. #19

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    I usually paddle with my wife and three kids and so try to minimise risks and carry what is sensible. I have a red 40L Ortlieb dry bag that is always packed with stuff in case of emergency and a blue drybag with the other stuff - food drinks, stove, etc. If the weather looks bad we bring a third bag with waterlroofs, gloves and hats.

    In the red bag I have:

    Spare clothes for all.
    A group shelter.
    A decent first aid kit with any medication like antihistamines.
    A head torch.
    A map and compass.
    A GPS and spare batteries.
    A fixed blade knife - usually a Mora Companion
    A folding saw - Bahco Laplander
    A fire steel and some cotton wool.

    After 10 years of paddling with the family I don’t think Ive ever had to use any of it apart from when the kids wanted to roast Marshmallows. Hopefully we will never need it in the future!

    Nick

  20. #20
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    When on UK expedition for more than a day up two weeks, I can fit all I need in 2 x 35 litre barrels and a small dry bag, for possibly wet, tent or tarp, (I hammock where possible).

    Overseas travel and flight baggage limitations, I carry a 100ltr dry bag with gear and food for up to 2 weeks (within baggage weight limit 23kg) and a smaller dry bag as carry on baggage, usually close to weight limit.

    Buying food locally for overseas trips of longer duration or due to food import restrictions, (Canada confiscated our freeze dried beef but not the FD chicken?). Also take care with language problems, in Sweden I bought a tube of squeezey cheese to spread on oatcakes. The biscuits were great but the cheese was "sweetened condensed milk" . In Finland, matters were worse and caution caused some limitations.

    Enjoy your trips,

    Doug
    When there's trouble on shore, there's peace on the wave,
    Afloat in the White Canoe.
    Alan Sullivan


  21. #21

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    Thanks for all of the inputs into this, I'm enjoying hearing everyone's different thoughts.
    Best Wishes.
    ScoutingSteve

  22. #22
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    It all changes when you are going beyond the range of a hot thermos. Before that no cooking stuff. Or when the water is going to be rough (throw bags, saw, tape and crab, pin kit), before that painter, spare paddle. Clothing is interesting. In the winter I paddle white water in a dry suit. My experience and "risk assessment" tell me that it is very unlikely to tear, and so any spare clothing is for temperature control. My right hand blisters so a collection of gloves in all weathers, and, as I suffer from Renauds, things like ski gloves and liners. I use to affect Marigolds and Damart s when a yaker, but they squeak when I J. I've not done a lot of over nighting, but when I did I had one barrel food related stuff, one for sleeping and spare clothes, and my ex flare container for stuff to be kept dry or wanted on voyage, and a tent. Unlike those who canoe because they can't get all their kit into their back pack, I consider my self the Empty Boat Man, which although not true shows the way my thoughts are leaning.
    My worst scenarios, which passed off ok were racing WW on the Tees when it was full of huge chunks of ice, and the spray deck froze to the cockpit rim, when we were warm but not hot at then end, and two days touring of incessant rain, when I remained fairly dry and warm. Might not have been the case if it had rained the next day.

    Impcanoe

    ps I do believe I might have been treated to an ice cream from Adrians kit!
    .

  23. #23
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    You are welcome Peter.

    Taking dollars but no ice cream shops in Algonquin.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Cooper View Post
    Ice cream money. I always have this in my BA in Sterling and Euros.
    I’ve extended Adrian’s idea by adding extra money to get wine .... I know he won’t need it so mine is safe if I’m with him.
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Open Canoe hire/outfitting in the Massif Central
    We will make your trip work



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