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Thread: South River Tyne

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kiveton Park, South Yorkshire.
    Posts
    40

    Default South River Tyne

    Hi All,

    Just returned from a week camping near Haltwhistle - noticed that the South River Tyne from Slaggyford to Haltwhistle was very low, even after all this rain.

    Would like to return to the area soon, been reading up, however, could do with some local knowledge.

    Is a Trip from Haltwhistle to Hexham going to be paddleable in May or later? - what other options are there in the area?

    Also noticed that there was a tree in the middle of Featherstone weir

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Doncaster
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Keep your eyes open for the annual Tyne Tour. Great event

    Andy
    The river flows, flows to the sea
    Wherever that river flows, that's where I want to be

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,824

    Default

    I think its often too low for paddling for much of the year. I remember folk saying they didn't mind the previous "access agreement" limiting paddlers to wetter months, as it wasn't paddleabe the rest of the time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NE England
    Posts
    1,353

    Default

    The South Tyne does get boney in summer and loses it's water quickly, even at last years Tyne Tour it was described to me as a walk. Haltwhistle (or normally Hayden Bridge) to Hexham is a nice trip if there's water, pretty and interesting. There's a video by Sundowner, of him, Barelyafloat, David Perry and I think I spotted Martin Melling there too going down it with some water a few years ago. Never sure about linking to other people's videos, but search youtube for "Tyne Tour 2015 South Tyne".

    Access agreement wise, if you follow it, and if it's still in place, it's high water for this month and next, then spate only for the next couple, then leave it for the fishermen til November when you can paddle it in any state (although I'd make sure there was at least some water). The rest of the Tyne system is on the same agreement.

    Of similar character and grade on the Tyne system, Bellingham to Wark is really pretty, Wark to Chollerford is pretty but a touch harder grade. Any section below Hexham would fit the bill, with a very nasty weir (with new portage steps) at Riding Mill, so, Hexham to Bywell, Bywell to Prudhoe, Prudhoe to Wylam or Newburn, there may be a rapid below Wylam Bridge if the tide is out. Some of the main Tyne sections are quite short so might be worth doubling them up, for example Bywell to Wylam isn't all that far.

    If you want to up the grade, the classic Chollerford to Hexham has the grade III hit of Warden Gorge. If it's rained all week and is still raining you might catch the Allen in condition, it's short but worth it from Cuppola Bridge to Planky Mill, it's good grade III.

    Back to grade II or easier, but a little further afield, Durham to Finchale on the Wear is nice enough if a little bland. The Blyth and Wansbeck both go but I've only done them once each, about a week apart and a long time ago so what few memories I have blur together, there wasn't anything too serious on them that I remember, apart from one having discarded syringes at the get out so wear thick soled shoes.

    If you want to push the grade and the distance you're willing to drive, there's the Tees to the South or the Eden to the west.
    The only thing you have to fear is Mergatroid the vengeful, man eating bear.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    27

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    Haydon Bridge to Hexham is a nice paddle - ideal river level is 0.6 at Haydon Bridge on the Environment Agency site, I would bother paddling below 0.5 as its too boney

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Robin Hood's Bay,Yorkshire
    Posts
    2,708

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    Many of our northern rivers have very 'hilly' catchment areas. Generally this means 'recent' rains run off and into the sea very quickly. "Recent rains" means anything with the last two or three days!.

    As opposed to one river locally to me, the Derwent, has a large catchment but which is almost entirely fed from small lowland streams. It takes the rains & consequently the water two, or three days to drain into the lower reaches - so lower down it can be flooded, but the upper streams which fed the rain may now be at normal levels as the water has gone down stream.

    As for the tree on the weir. Unless its someone else's I'm sure you can keep it.
    http://www.davidwperry.blogspot.co.uk/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NE England
    Posts
    1,353

    Default

    Just to emphasise David's point.

    I was sat in my flat in Newcastle one night last summer, watching a storm on the horizon (over the North Pennines) and went paddling at Prudhoe the next day. About 12-14 hours after watching the storm, the river went from boney to washed out, 4 hours later the river was back to boney again.

    The North Tyne can be a little more reliable, it's fed from Kielder Dam, their release schedule is here. However, the release schedule can change so it isn't always easy to plan a paddle in advance.

    I have in my head that it needs at least 4 cumecs of release for a boney but runnable level at Warden Gorge, but don't quote me on that. As a guide releases take around 10-12 hours to hit Chollerford.
    The only thing you have to fear is Mergatroid the vengeful, man eating bear.

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