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Thread: Roof racks

  1. #1

    Question Roof racks

    Hi we are about to upgrade our inflatable kayaks for a family canoe (likely Mackinaw 156 Canoe) but have no idea about roof racks???

    They seem either really expensive or cheap and not sure what to get?

    Looked at them foam detachable ones from argos as they seem like a great idea and it says they can handle the weight and I can't go above 50mph... any help would be appreciated.

    link to Argos bell. Cheers

    http://www.argos.co.uk/product/2149347?cmpid=GS001%7D&_$ja=tsid:59156%7Cacid:444-797-0832%7Ccid:189934405%7Cagid:18074225845%7Ctid:aud-144400486596la-96619497925%7Ccrid:77627770765%7Cnw:g%7Crnd:145702 85047313511888%7Cdvc:m%7Cadp:1o1%7Cmt:%7Cloc:10073 12&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7qnR7a3C2gIVT1XTCh0VtwM2EAQYA SABEgJMi_D_BwE


  2. #2
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    If you care anything at all about your car, stay well away from the Argos pads. There will be movement from these that will abrade your paintwork.
    Not only that, the part of the roof that those pads sit on was not designed to carry a 44kg canoe. All cars have a maximum roof weight limit, but that's dependent on using the proper mounting points as directed by the manufacturer. These are normally along the roof edges where it's strongest and is supported by the door pillars, NOT in the middle of the roof.

    Do not underestimate the force that comes to bear on a canoe and what it's tied to when on a car roof - wind lift is tremendous, as are side winds on a windy day.

    My advice is to buy the best roof bars and fittings you can afford, and yes some are expensive, but what price do you put on the safety of yourselves and others.
    Last edited by OLD MAN; 18th-April-2018 at 09:40 AM.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    An ex work colleague was once responsible for a multi-car pile up on the M40 when he failed to secure the front of his roof box correctly and it opened at 70 miles per hour. Nobody was injured but he was still prosecuted for having an unsafe load.

    A canoe is not something you want to have leave the roof, so I would agree, only buy purpose made high quality bars. If you go with after market bars from Thule or Halfords, they come in several parts: bars; clamps; foot kits. When you change your car you only have to replace one or two of the parts rather than all three and the discarded parts sell well on eBay.
    "I'd far rather be happy than right any day"..........Slartibartfast

    http://apachecanoes.com

  4. #4

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    Probably best to go for proper roof racks! I'll probably change car soon so that was puttin
    gme offbeat a wee bit!

  5. #5
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    I have had several roofracks for various cars from ebay. Currently have Thule aerobars on my kia, think I paid about 30 and local pickup. When I was looking I left a couple of ebay searches running with the part numbers for the bar I wanted and the feet pack, but ended up finding the complete set from one seller. Think you have to inform your insurance company.

    Should also add if the car you have or are getting has raised roof rails, the bits you need are pretty cheap.

  6. #6

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    Cheers! To be honest I think i was overthinking them and not really knowing what I was looking for, I'll nip into halfords and see what they say to make life easier!

  7. #7
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    Thule. Interchangeable foot pack, job done for life
    If it wasn't for the rain in our lives there would be no rivers. X 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by tenboats1 View Post
    Thule. Interchangeable foot pack, job done for life
    I'll second that.

    On my third set of foot packs having just changed my car again.

    I bought from https://roofracks.co.uk/ . They do part exchange.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tenboats1 View Post
    Thule. Interchangeable foot pack, job done for life
    Agreed to a point, but I did discover that my Thule square bars had become quite badly corroded after 10+ years of use, so beware. They no longer make the standard square bars, but I managed to source a 2nd hand Halfords branded set on e-bay, so I'm sorted for another 10 years.

  10. #10
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    I don't normally get into giving advice on roof racks. But I urge you to reconsider your choice of boat. The Mackinaw is not a well designed craft. If you are buying it because it is cheap, I suggest you look around for a better boat second hand. They do last quite well.

  11. #11

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    Happy with the mackinaw. No doubt will upgrade at some point out just looking for something that floats and is stable! Just for family days and to reach some small islands to camp on so seems to be perfect for us and at a good price, seems to be a bite heavier than most but once its on the water it shouldn't matter! Hopefully...

  12. #12
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    This may seem obvious but I see many items carried on roof racks without them on. That is at least one rope tied to the front of the canoe and down to a strong point at the front of the car, if you cant find a suitable point fit the towing eye and tie to that, ideally do the same at the back. The force created by wind getting under the boat is considerable and from my experience most roof bars are not good at resisting an upward force.
    "Rules are for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men"
    Grp Cpt Sir Douglas Bader CBE,DSO,DFC,FRAeS.

  13. #13

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    Thanks for all the be advice.

    wen into Halfords today and can't get roof racks for my car (Chevrolet Cruze) as its not very common basically, the guy was suorised and said they even have alternatives etc but none for my car not even the Thule ones!

    so went for the halford bars for my partners car!

    is it best to use rope or the "bungee" cords with hooks in the end for the ring and back of the canoe? I also plan to use "ratchet" belts to hold down the canoe!

  14. #14
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    is it best to use rope or the "bungee" cords with hooks in the end for the ring and back of the canoe? I also plan to use "ratchet" belts to hold down the canoe!
    Use rope, NOT bungee cord.
    Many people use ratchet straps, but be careful how much you tighten them as it's very possible to damage the canoe. Many others use cam straps, myself included, and I prefer them to ratchets.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  15. #15

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    Cheers! Why not the bungee cords? My only worry with the rope is it coming loose when driving! I don't know
    what a cam strap is but I'm about to google it!

  16. #16

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    Just ordered some cam straps!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fhaggis View Post
    Cheers! Why not the bungee cords? My only worry with the rope is it coming loose when driving! I don't know
    what a cam strap is but I'm about to google it!
    Too much stretch in bungee cords, if you're going to tie down the front and back of the boat, it needs to be tied down reasonably tight or it's not worth bothering.
    If you're not confident with knot tying, you can also use cam straps instead of rope for tying down both ends of the boat.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    Bungees to tie down the ends would be the worst possible thing. The point is to prevent the boat moving IF the rack or the straps allow any movement; the ideal tie down has zero stretch, so that you can tie it with no tension on it, but it will go tight as soon as any movement occurs. Bungees will pull down on the boat, stressing the boat and increasing the load on the rack, but if movement occurs they just stretch and don't stop it.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fhaggis View Post
    went into Halfords today and can't get roof racks for my car (Chevrolet Cruze) as its not very common basically, the guy was surprised and said they even have alternatives etc but none for my car not even the Thule ones!
    If you look at roofbox.co.uk and enter your car make and model it will give you a number of options. My guess is the man in Halfords just didn't have yours in stock

  20. #20

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    Question on the roof rack subject. Is it best to load the canoe direct to the roof rack bars or use the foam wrap arounds you can get? No foam would mean no movement at all but with the foam you could get slight movement?

  21. #21
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    I have loaded direct to the roofrack, used foam pipe lagging and finally bought the Thule canoe carrier attachments (pricey).

    Direct loading damaged the gunwales of the canoe as it tended to slide around slightly in cross winds. Foam pipe lagging reduced the sliding considerably and protected the gunwales.The Thule attachments are rock solid, no movement, and the padding protects the canoe.

    If I didn't have the Thule things I'd go for pipe lagging.

  22. #22
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    From what i have heard the foam can help 'stick' the canoe in place and reduce lateral movement.

    I dont use it and i find the canoe is more than stable enough just on the bars, and dont want the faf of removing foam after each use to reduce roof bar noise.

    However i use bonnet loops and a rear tie down aswell if i am going on the motorway or in high winds for the added security so they would probably have m,ore of an effect than the foam ever would

  23. #23
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    I sometimes slip some of that not slip foam sheet stuff you get for car dashboards at each of the 4 contact points. Cheap from B&Ms etc
    Cheers,

    Alan


  24. #24
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    Years ago I used to mess about with foam, lagging, whatever but then I thought about it & how it made sliding the boat onto rack much harder etc etc and just stopped. Been just using the rack itself for years now with no problems - thousands of kilometers at freeway speeds with nary a wobble (and it's an ultra-light kevlar boat...). I do use front and back tie-downs though, as well as the 2 crossover ones. Caveat - I have aluminum gunnels. If they were ash or similar I might think differently.


  25. #25
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    I agree with previous comments. Fixed bars, as good as you can afford with tie downs front and rear as per sk8r's photo.

    If possible I would also separate the bars as much as is possible on your roof to maximise the yaw stability of the canoe in cross winds. Some manufacturers provide roof bars that only fit roof rails at a fixed distance apart mainly to fit the standard roof box spacing. This is often done via a little peg on the foot that locates in a hole on the roof rail, it is possible to knock off the peg on some feet to allow the bars to be spaced further apart.

    If you are still after roof bars for your Chevy Cruze have a look here.
    https://roofracks.co.uk/Thule-Fit-Gu...make=Chevrolet
    Bootstrap
    There's no such thing as inclement weather - you're just incorrectly dressed

  26. #26
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    Some manufacturers provide roof bars that only fit roof rails at a fixed distance apart mainly to fit the standard roof box spacing.
    If a car doesn't allow me to place the bars at the ends of the roof, I buy a different car.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_B View Post
    If a car doesn't allow me to place the bars at the ends of the roof, I buy a different car.
    Me too. Vauxhall Astra estate. About 4ft spacing between the bars.
    Big Al.

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bob View Post
    I agree with previous comments. Fixed bars, as good as you can afford with tie downs front and rear as per sk8r's photo.

    If possible I would also separate the bars as much as is possible on your roof to maximise the yaw stability of the canoe in cross winds.
    I absolutely agree that the bars should be as wide apart as you can. The reason they are so close in my photo is just that when I bought that new car I cheaped-out a bit and just monkeyed with the rack from my previous car to make it fit the new one. And even being as inventive as I could, that's as far apart as I could get them given the roof-line curve on the new one. Less than ideal, certainly, but it saved me $250.00 so I live with it (works fine, as it turns out... ) .

  29. #29
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    Some pipe lagging used to fit square bars reasonably well, but modern alloy bars are larger in section, the thick yellow foam protection used on scaffolding works a treat, quite cheap from scaffolding suppliers and free from motorway verges if you keep your eyes peeled.
    Last edited by DougR; 28th-June-2019 at 05:55 PM.
    This post may vanish at any moment.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
    I have loaded direct to the roofrack, used foam pipe lagging and finally bought the Thule canoe carrier attachments (pricey).

    Direct loading damaged the gunwales of the canoe as it tended to slide around slightly in cross winds. Foam pipe lagging reduced the sliding considerably and protected the gunwales.The Thule attachments are rock solid, no movement, and the padding protects the canoe.

    If I didn't have the Thule things I'd go for pipe lagging.
    The Yakima KeelOver canoe carriers are similar in principle (and design) to the Thule system but are two thirds of the price. They make loading the canoe onto the roof slightly more difficult, but fixing it down securely is easier. They also appear to fit aero-type bars (at least my Whispbars) without additional brackets.
    David

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