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Thread: Location location location

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Hessle East Yorkshire
    Posts
    19

    Default Location location location

    Hi all,
    This year I intend on getting out a lot more. Specifically moving water grade 1,2 so I can increase my skill level.

    Being based in East Yorkshire (Hessle) Iím looking at the best places to go. I also havenít really got any to go with either.. (sobbing to myself in the corner) anyway,
    Iíve been looking at the river guide book website and this is good but for me it could do with a map rather than regional lists of routes.

    From my location where are the best locations to head for? Maybe top 3 to sink my teeth into without getting out of my depths too quickly.

    I appreciate any input.

    Kind Regards



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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,920

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    Hey,

    If you want to get into moving water, you really want to go with a group. For safety reasons, and for ease of shuttle! You'll also learn far faster.

    As for where, well, launch spots are mentioned on Paddle Points, but you'll have to open and look for "routes" to get more detail.

    UKRGB you already know.

    The Rainchasers website is designed to show levels, but as it also grades routes, might help you. It tends only to show top end grade 2 and upwards though, and doesn't tell you details of the route.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Doncaster
    Posts
    602

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    Have a look at Sleningford Mill. Up the road from you and always other paddlers about, so being on your own not a problem

    Andy
    The river flows, flows to the sea
    Wherever that river flows, that's where I want to be

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    308

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    I wouldn't describe the drop at sleningford grade 2 but it looks rather impressive

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Doncaster
    Posts
    602

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    Quote Originally Posted by E_McNeill View Post
    I wouldn't describe the drop at sleningford grade 2 but it looks rather impressive

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    There's some nice bouncy bits above and below the drop and porterage isn't a problem
    The river flows, flows to the sea
    Wherever that river flows, that's where I want to be

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Hessle East Yorkshire
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Thanks,
    Mal, not intending on going on my own. I haven't seen the rainchaser site before looks very useful.

    Looks like these locations are all fairly equidistant to me.


    Darley Dale to Matlock
    https://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/...ale-to-matlock
    Richmond to Catterick
    https://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/...d-to-catterick
    Ikley to Otley
    https://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/...lkley-to-otley
    Mickley to Slenningford
    https://www.ukriversguidebook.co.uk/...-west-tanfield

    any further thoughts or contributions would be appreciated.

    Cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    1,582

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    An interesting way of doing things if you do want to go yourself is to get some upstream poling/paddling/lining practice in.

    Once you've tackled a section from the downstream direction, you know what to do from the upstream direction. You can be confident everything you come across will be runnable. It also gives you a much better appreciation of the vagueries of moving water. Also no need for a shuttle.

    Here's an example of me doing just that on the Upper Derwent in Cumbria (not all pictures showing, I'm surprised any of them are to be fair).
    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...hlight=derwent
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nr Hampton Court, West London
    Posts
    2,791

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    I missed your blog first time round Mr Stinkwheel. I've been what ever the written form of "vocal" is on my lack of a wish to pole anywhere. This is the first, and only, example of why one might want to do it. Coincidentally, as I have always said "if I want to pole I'll join the Punting club near me" a casual chat with a Marshal at one of my grandaughter's "Head" races on the Thames led to a conducted tour of Ditton Skiff and Punt Club, and an invitation to try punting later this year. If you are a boat nut, any sort of boat, like me, the joys of very old and brand new Thames Skiffs on display in the warmth of the boat house was terrific.

    I often encounter a group of "skiffers" of vintage age who own their own craft on a trailer, and launch at various points on the Thames to row to a pub for lunch and back. I quite fancy a paddling group like that if there are other retired old codgers with canoes about on these pages.

    Thames Skiffs are descendants of the waterman's craft that used to ply the Thames as taxis. They have fixed oarlocks , no out rigger or sliding seats, and their approaching noise, (like swans taking off, or steam trains or outrigger rowing boats or paddle steamers--once heard never forgotten) is the splash of the blades and the clunk of the looms as they move across the gap between the thole pins.

    Impcanoe

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
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    Another option for the shuttle if you're confident the river is very placid is using a folding bicycle.

    I've used it effectively for places like Loch Ken. Launching into the river at the Ken Bridge Hotel paddle down the river into the Loch, continuing down the loch and then cycling back to get the car.

    Ewan

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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wetherby
    Posts
    1,097

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    If you want to practice moving water skills, the Ure at Boroughbridge is a useful site, which doesn't require much portaging or a shuttle. If you put in at the weir car park, you can travel downstream with lots of eddies and moving water to play with. Nothing too extreme, but useful practice. After about a km you can then portage through the lock onto the Milby Cut, and paddle back to the start, and go around again.

    Finishing the day shooting the fish ladder is fun.
    "Oh, Eeyore, you are wet!" said Piglet, feeling him.Eeyore shook himself, and asked somebody to explain to Piglet what happened when you had been inside a river for quite a long time.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Leeds
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyro View Post
    After about a km you can then portage through the lock onto the Milby Cut, and paddle back to the start, and go around again.

    Finishing the day shooting the fish ladder is fun.
    Is this the lock just upstream of where the river below the fish ladder rejoins the main ure?

    What's that lock like to portage?

    I've always avoided it as it looks like a rather high bank a large drop.

    Ewan


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wetherby
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    Quote Originally Posted by E_McNeill View Post
    Is this the lock just upstream of where the river below the fish ladder rejoins the main ure?

    What's that lock like to portage?

    I've always avoided it as it looks like a rather high bank a large drop.

    Ewan


    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
    I'm not sure what you mean about rejoining the main Ure, as it is the main river. The boat cut rejoins the river there. It is quite a high lock, but using ropes it is easy enough to lift a boat, particularly if there are two of you.
    "Oh, Eeyore, you are wet!" said Piglet, feeling him.Eeyore shook himself, and asked somebody to explain to Piglet what happened when you had been inside a river for quite a long time.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Hessle East Yorkshire
    Posts
    19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyro View Post
    If you want to practice moving water skills, the Ure at Boroughbridge is a useful site, which doesn't require much portaging or a shuttle. If you put in at the weir car park, you can travel downstream with lots of eddies and moving water to play with. Nothing too extreme, but useful practice. After about a km you can then portage through the lock onto the Milby Cut, and paddle back to the start, and go around again.

    Finishing the day shooting the fish ladder is fun.
    This sounds like a good contender, and is significantly closer to me, thanks


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