Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Restoration of old fibreglass canoe.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Dundee, Scotland
    Posts
    67

    Default Restoration of old fibreglass canoe.

    Hi all, long time no post.

    I recently rescued 3 boats from the dump, including this rather sorry-looking 16.5 foot fibreglass canoe. The chap who was throwing it out informs me it was built by McNulty Sea Glass. The hull is solid, but decks & gunwales are all rotten so will be getting replaced. I'm quite looking forward to the project as it will be a nice big boat for 2-3 souls & gear for some canoe camping adventures.

    The other 2 boats are single kayaks, which again are solid but just need cleaned up and maybe a paint job. Seemed a shame to see them thrown out so hopefully someone else can enjoy them.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Robin Hood's Bay,Yorkshire
    Posts
    2,837

    Default

    A good scrub up, some new gunwales and a bit o' polish and you're sorted.
    http://www.davidwperry.blogspot.co.uk/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Dumbarton
    Posts
    2,741

    Default

    McNulty kayaks were pretty heavily constructed as I recall, I reckon once you get the woodwork off you will find that hull is still plenty strong for its age

    The hatches look like old style 17cm ones (rather than even older henderson style screw down ones) if so you should be able to get replacement rubber covers in most sea kayak shops, the Kajaksport covers seem to fit the older British rims OK.

    How hard can it be?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Dundee, Scotland
    Posts
    67

    Default

    I gave the canoe a power wash and she cleans up not too bad. I've been thinking about a colour change though. Can anyone advise, is it just a case of rubbing down the original gelcoat/topcoat, washing it in acetone and applying a new topcoat?


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Aldershot
    Posts
    579

    Default

    With that gelcoat nicely broken down, it should take a marine enamel really well. Two-pack if you want to be spendy but a few coats of https://www.boatpaint.co.uk/acatalog...Multicoat.html will hold up prety well. I used undercoat first on my canoe but there's no need really. The undercoat is a little higher build though so does fill small pits ok. I'd be tempted to use a short-pile mini roller.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Wirral
    Posts
    802

    Default

    Firstly, well done on the cleanup, that looks great! With new fittings it will be very handsome.

    if it were me, I'd leave it the same colour. Gel coat is pretty tough but as your boat is light coloured, any surface scratches will be hard to spot. Were you to paint it, you would end up with white scratches showing through very prominently. The other consideration is the weight, which goes up with every coat of paint.
    "I'd far rather be happy than right any day"..........Slartibartfast

    http://apachecanoes.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Aldershot
    Posts
    579

    Default

    How about painting it, but a similar colour to the existing gelcoat ?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Dundee, Scotland
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Thanks for the replies chaps. I had been thinking about a light colour so that scratches didn't show up too bad, but I'm now leaning towards keeping it white. I'm not sure if it was white originally but it has yellowed and looks a bit ivory now.


    I did think a new gelcoat would be heavy, but I thought it would do a good job of filling in any hairline cracks. Maybe I should spend a bit more time flattening out the worst ones and go with a couple of coats of paint instead.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Deepest darkest Wales
    Posts
    3,978

    Default

    Applying fresh gel coat to the outside of an existing hull is a very dodgy job -

    The gel coat products are usually air inhibited so take a very very long time to cure unless all air is excluded (as it would be in a mould lay-up).

    You could use a wax loaded "Flow-Coat" but I've never seen a really good finish on a large area with that approach.
    This post may vanish at any moment.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •