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Thread: Setting time fillets and other small questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    Belgium, Gent
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    Default Setting time fillets and other small questions

    I have stitched my Fisher Prospector and I will do the filleting today. When can I remove the stitches? The epoxy has a curing time of 24 to 36 hours. The room is 20 degrees C. Is it safe to remove them after 20 some hours so I can finish the filleting?

    Regarding gunwales: I can get hold of ash and red cedar. Since the cedar is lighter and bends more easily, I want to know if I can use that?

    If I would like to add some black design on the wood before glassing, what can I use? Black chinese ink?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Cumbria
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    I think the answer for the epoxy is going to be, when it's set. Setting times vary immensley due to so many factors such as temperature, himidity and mixing time. So have a poke at it and see if it's "gone off".

    I'm no wood expert but ash is, I believe, stronger, harder and less prone to splitting then cedar. Certainly ash seems to be the "go-to" wood for gunwales on most boats I've seen (in the absence of mahogany). Even on cedar strip canoes, where the presumably had a ready source of cedar.

    You shouldn't have any problems bending ash gunwales onto a SF prospector. They guys who were making one at the same time I was building my boat bent their sepale gunwales up by hand (using lots of clamps). Recruiting multiple hands for that stage is helpful. If you can geth the centre clamped then get an assistant/assistants to bend the gunwale up into position by hand while someone else puts the clamps on, it makes the job go very smoothly. You can see if it'll bend that far before you glue it anyway, just clamp the centre with 3 or 4 clamps and pull up on the end. You'll need to do that to get the length right and set the meeting angle of the inwales.

    I'll admit I was slightly disappointed we didn't need to steam bend any wood when I built my boat, I'd have liked to try the process out.

    I wonder if pyrography would be a good way of doing some black designs?
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  3. #3
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    Dec 2017
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    Belgium, Gent
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    Thanks Stinkwheel. I didn't want to take any chances and have waited 24 hours before removing the stitches. I had visions of popping seems
    All went well thankfully. Tomorrow sanding the outside and glassing.

    Regarding the gunwales: I think I can get hold of Douglas as well. It seems this is often used and I hope a little bit cheaper than Ash...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    North Angus
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    This is quite an interesting article,including the author's thoughts on using cedar gunwhales as a weight saving option:- http://www.paddlinglight.com/article...ness-tripping/

  5. #5
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    Dec 2017
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    Thanks for the really useful info!

  6. #6
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    Jan 2017
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    Stratford, Ontario
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    You may wish to consider that cedar is significantly softer than ash and will wear at the points of paddle contact. You will also find that it bruises (dents) more easily and that those bruises will be the entry for future compromised structural issues. At Ashes we DO use cedar and sometimes spruce as the core of our gunnels but we've learned the hard way to laminate a hardwood rail to the outer and inner edges of the gunnels. Ultimately, you'll find that you have fewer repairs in the future, and in the near-term, a more smooth and functional gunnel against which to "rub" and "pry" your paddle.

    Good luck and post pics!
    Trevor Paetkau
    Ashes Still Water Boats
    Canoe Plans | Custom Boats

  7. #7
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    Dec 2017
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    Belgium, Gent
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    Pfew, your info came just in time, since I plan to go and get the wood for the gunnels today! I'll take ash for the outer gunnels. Would Douglas be OK for all the interior wood? ( interior gunnel, yoke, seats )

  8. #8
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    Jan 2017
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    Stratford, Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenbull View Post
    Pfew, your info came just in time, since I plan to go and get the wood for the gunnels today! I'll take ash for the outer gunnels. Would Douglas be OK for all the interior wood? ( interior gunnel, yoke, seats )
    I've used fir for decks and thwarts with no issue but I've never been confident doing so with seats so I'm afraid I can't comment based on experience. I'd think the weight penalty for using ash would be minimal however, perhaps worth the peace of mind?
    Trevor Paetkau
    Ashes Still Water Boats
    Canoe Plans | Custom Boats

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