Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Old dog and new tricks

  1. #1

    Default Old dog and new tricks

    Hello from Edinburgh.

    Many years ago I did some canoeing in Patagonia and now in my 50s have decided to have another go at canoeing. So far this year we have managed a 3 day trip on Loch Marree, a couple of days on the great glen and 6 days down the dordogne.
    I have joined here looking for information on which rivers and lochs are good to canoe on and also some skills tips / suggestions as to training. We are experienced trekkers and hillwalkers with good lightweight camping kit. One of the reasons for trying canoes is to be able to take more food so be away from civilisation longer. Walking about 5 days food is the max we can carry.

    The aim / dream is to get good enough to take a trip right out into the fjords and glaciers of patgonia when we retire but there is no way we are capable of that now if ever :-)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Hi Teej, I like your ambition! Iím also a keen hill goer and enjoy the combination of hills and canoeing. My mountain journeys have been rejuvenated by the experience of visiting familiar glens by boat rather than on foot. And as you mentioned there is a whole lot more stuff you can get in a canoe!

    PS Welcome!
    Last edited by Bananaboat; 3rd-December-2017 at 03:37 PM. Reason: Ps

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,167

    Default

    Hello and Welcome!

    For a "beginner" that's a pretty good list of this year's paddle destinations.

    Paddling in Patagonia sounds like a wonderful ambition. Apart from a lack of calving glaciers, I think Scotland should be a pretty good training ground though.

    There are so many places to paddle I don't know where to start really, but for trips of a few days here are a few ideas. You'll soon find that as well as extra food, you start taking a few luxuries too once you realise you have space! Tarps, fireboxes and chairs seem to be a good starting point!


    Glen Affric. Either start on Loch Beinn a' Mheadhoin, as we did, then portage up to Loch Affric, or just drive straight to the latter. Good for newer paddlers as the lochs are slightly smaller.

    Inverpolly (not sure if you want portaging too, there's plenty of scope there for that!). The three lochs below Stac Polaidh would be a lovely start, Loch Sionasgaig needs a portage to get at it but is then wonderful. Loch Veyatie is accessible from close to the road, and leads into Fionn Loch.

    Loch Shiel-Moidart-Ailort circuit. Or just a "there and back"

    Loch Morar/Nevis

    (These latter two involve coastal paddling and can be very serious)

    Maree you've already done. Good, isn't it!


    Paddling on big lochs needs similar decision making to walking Scotland's hills. The same changeable weather, same need for a plan B, same days sitting out the weather hoping it will change. Sounds like you'll be used to that .

    There are a couple of good books on Scottish trips;

    https://www.pesdapress.com/index.php...s-2nd-edition/

    https://www.pesdapress.com/index.php...canoe-touring/


    For more general things like launch points etc, have a look at Paddle Points.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks. I also put a thread up in the main forum. Portage is pretty much a no for us I think :-) We have been looking at Loch Sheil end to end - looks good.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    the highlands
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Hi Teej, fellow STW'er here.
    Don't rule out portages, they really do add to the experience and take you to quieter areas just because they are a bit more work to get to. You have decent lightweight kit, get a reasonable weight boat if you can and its not too bad.
    Loch Quoich is a favourite of mine without a carry involved

  6. #6

    Default

    I have enough trouble with t'missus when our cycle rides turn into "taking the bike for a walk". If I suggest " taking a canoe for a walk" I suspect there might be a rebellion

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Just a little to the right of the Shire
    Posts
    2,710

    Default

    Hi Teej and welcome to SoTP, I think Loch Shiel could well fit the bill. You can leave your car at the Glenfinnan Hotel (for a modest fee) sign in a book with a return ETA and just go exploring the Loch. If the weather turns bad there is a postal track on the southern shore running from Glennfinnan to Polloch to escape along.

    Enjoy
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  8. #8

    Default

    Teej, given your aspiration to go to Patagonia, you might like this:

    http://www.erinbastian.com/patagonia.html

    I'd like to go and paddle there as well but it shouldn't be underestimated. I've done about 4000 miles in a sea kayak so far and I'm not sure I could cope with it.

  9. #9

    Default

    I did spend a fortnight paddling in the lagoons and rivers in southern patagonia 30 years ago ( not in open sea) so have some idea of what it entails. Its something to aim for - to get good enough to be reasonably safe doing this.

    Same as my other retirement aim is to solo a 6000m peak - I have my eye on one. Both difficult but acheivable

    Ta for the link tho. I had a look at it and they are further south and less sheltered than where I am thinking of and also with that snow not in mid summer
    Last edited by Teej; 6th-December-2017 at 04:58 PM.

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Hello and Welcome!

    For a "beginner" that's a pretty good list of this year's paddle destinations.

    Paddling in Patagonia sounds like a wonderful ambition. Apart from a lack of calving glaciers, I think Scotland should be a pretty good training ground though.

    There are so many places to paddle I don't know where to start really, but for trips of a few days here are a few ideas. You'll soon find that as well as extra food, you start taking a few luxuries too once you realise you have space! Tarps, fireboxes and chairs seem to be a good starting point!


    Glen Affric. Either start on Loch Beinn a' Mheadhoin, as we did, then portage up to Loch Affric, or just drive straight to the latter. Good for newer paddlers as the lochs are slightly smaller.

    Inverpolly (not sure if you want portaging too, there's plenty of scope there for that!). The three lochs below Stac Polaidh would be a lovely start, Loch Sionasgaig needs a portage to get at it but is then wonderful. Loch Veyatie is accessible from close to the road, and leads into Fionn Loch.

    Loch Shiel-Moidart-Ailort circuit. Or just a "there and back"

    Loch Morar/Nevis

    (These latter two involve coastal paddling and can be very serious)

    Maree you've already done. Good, isn't it!


    Paddling on big lochs needs similar decision making to walking Scotland's hills. The same changeable weather, same need for a plan B, same days sitting out the weather hoping it will change. Sounds like you'll be used to that .

    There are a couple of good guide websites:

    https://www.dietprobe.com/

    https://www.pesdapress.com/index.php...s-2nd-edition/

    https://www.pesdapress.com/index.php...canoe-touring/


    For more general things like launch points etc, have a look at Paddle Points.
    Cheers for sharing!
    Last edited by ImUpTheCreek; 10th-December-2017 at 01:57 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •