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Thread: Frontier wood burning stove

  1. #1

    Default Frontier wood burning stove

    Hi All.

    I've just bought one of these. I seem to remember reading the 'best way' to use these for the first time. Can't for the life of me remember the details though. There aren't any instructions in the box. Is it just a case of load it up and light it? Or a couple of smaller burns is advisable? And will it keep the matt black appearance, or will it flake and turn rust colored?

    Thanks in advance
    On Twitter @grumpybutcute

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by The grumpy dad View Post
    Hi All.

    I've just bought one of these. I seem to remember reading the 'best way' to use these for the first time. Can't for the life of me remember the details though. There aren't any instructions in the box. Is it just a case of load it up and light it? Or a couple of smaller burns is advisable? And will it keep the matt black appearance, or will it flake and turn rust colored?

    Thanks in advance
    Light them up outside for. Maybe a couple of times. Yes, eventually there will be some paint coming off. Keep the sticks small. If you have it in a tent, buy some fire bricks and put them on top. When the fire is out the bricks will still give off heat. Don't use home logs they'll clogg up the flu. Hope this helps �� oh and clean the flu after every use

    "I'm very good at hearing badly but very good with my bad eyesight"

  3. #3
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    I lit mine in the garden a couple of times. That got rid of the slightly metally/oily smell. It rusted slightly, but only because I left it out in rain. Actually it was great to have going in the garden on a cold, dry evening.

  4. #4

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    Happy day's. Thanks for the pointers. I'll give it a whirl this week.

    Cheers
    On Twitter @grumpybutcute

  5. #5
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    Put a bit of scrunched up chicken wire along the bottom inside. This will keep the fire off the bottom and stop it burning through the metal and will also help the draw. Always best to leave some ash in too. The narrow flue and mesh spark guard do clog easily so clean each time after use or before using the next time.
    Get Paddling!

    Blott

  6. #6

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    Cracking idea Re the chicken wire. Iam off tomorrow and plan getting it lit prior to using it the lakes in the coming weeks.

    Thanks for that. ;0)
    On Twitter @grumpybutcute

  7. #7

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    I'm also considering getting one of these and would be interested to know how long roughly it takes for the fire to burn out and Stove to cool down enough to dismantle it after you finished using it.

    Thanks

    Ewan

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  8. #8
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    That kind of depends how long you've had it burning and with how much wood. We have closed the door on mine around midnight and there have still been glowing embers 8 hours later, but this was after it had been used all night as a camp fire.

    It is possible to cook breakfast and have it packed up in around 4 hours.

    It's also worth noting that the stove will rust, it's made of steel after all - however a quick spray and wipe of WD40 after every use keeps the worst at bay
    Quote Originally Posted by E_McNeill View Post
    I'm also considering getting one of these and would be interested to know how long roughly it takes for the fire to burn out and Stove to cool down enough to dismantle it after you finished using it.

    Thanks

    Ewan

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  9. #9
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    "It's also worth noting that the stove will rust, it's made of steel after all - however a quick spray and wipe of WD40 after every use keeps the worst at bay "

    I used to do that and it helps but smokes like crazy when you re-light it the next time so let it burn off before you sit near and ventilate the tent!
    Get Paddling!

    Blott

  10. #10

    Default

    I have used a frontier stove in a tent found it caused a smoky atmosphere .If using in a tent was the main purpose of buying 1 I would look into a alternative stove in a more traditional style .

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chjo View Post
    I have used a frontier stove in a tent found it caused a smoky atmosphere .If using in a tent was the main purpose of buying 1 I would look into a alternative stove in a more traditional style .
    Shouldn't be a problem if its drawing properly and the fuel is dry, and I've been in many large tents where the owner uses a Frontier Stove without any noticeable smokiness at all. After all, they are actually designed to be able to be used in tents.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  12. #12
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    Absolutely Mal, dry wood and a good draw. They work best hot ��
    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    Shouldn't be a problem if its drawing properly and the fuel is dry, and I've been in many large tents where the owner uses a Frontier Stove without any noticeable smokiness at all. After all, they are actually designed to be able to be used in tents.

  13. #13

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    Fuel was dry smoke comes through the removable top plate no matter how much jiggling around to try and get a tight fit.Maybe mine was a Friday afternoon job as the locking pins for the legs have come away from the cable happened on its 1st use .

  14. #14
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    More likely to be that the stove wasn't drawing properly. You'd normally leave the door open a tiny bit anyway (there's a notch on the latch for this I think), so a perfect seal isn't needed. I'm no expert on chimneys/flues, but the top should be high enough and clear of the tent to get into any breeze there is, which will help the draw. Any stove can be difficult to get drawing when its cold I guess, it needs some heat to get the draw going...

    As for the locking pins, that shouldn't happen.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  15. #15

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    I will give it a try over the weekend .

  16. #16
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    There are a number of regular SOTP folk who actually own and use these stoves often, so maybe ask their advice too. I'm just a witness on most of these occasions!
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  17. #17
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    I have used huge number of wood burning stoves in tents and the frontier is one of my favourites.

    Generally the the issue with smoke is due to partial combustion. Damp wood and not enough air flow to provide the oxygen.

    Split the fuel down into small diameter sticks and don’t over load the combustion chamber.

    Only stove I have never been able to fathom properly is one in a cabin in Finland I use. No matter the configuration of the vents I manage to gas myself.

    Bushcraft Survival and First Aid Training.

  18. #18
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    I use one of these under canvas - easy to pack away, i had an ash-tray made up for the bottom so in the morning I can lift out most of the ash to avoid having to empty it by taking it apart, although some ash goes underneath the can, I can use it all weekend by emptying the tray. Also if packing up quick you can lift out the steel tray and cool it quickly with water and the stove will be ready to pack down in ten mins or so especially if it is stood outside in a breeze

    As for smoke free burning, all the tips are good, keep the flue clean (if you are in a hurry just banging the flue sections on a hard stone surface will get the surplus soot out of the flue if you did not bring a brushy

    Get some fire gauntlets too, or strong gloves, that way you wont get black hands when you dismantle it.

    I don't get a lot of smoke if I use dry wood, and kindling and get it going really well. It will rust but it is a stove, I find repainting with heat proof paint lasts a couple or three uses then burns off. But it is still working I have had mine three years and had it permanently fixed in my workshop / man cave for a winter and used it 2-3 times a weekend.

    Enjoy it they are a good price and great fun





    Quote Originally Posted by wayne View Post
    I have used huge number of wood burning stoves in tents and the frontier is one of my favourites.

    Generally the the issue with smoke is due to partial combustion. Damp wood and not enough air flow to provide the oxygen.

    Split the fuel down into small diameter sticks and donít over load the combustion chamber.

    Only stove I have never been able to fathom properly is one in a cabin in Finland I use. No matter the configuration of the vents I manage to gas myself.

  19. #19

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    Hi uncle Albert's

    How did you go about making an ashtray?

    Having to wait for the stove to burn down before disassembling it is what's currently putting me off getting one.

    Ewan

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  20. #20
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    Hi Ewan, I bought an aluminium scoop like you get for pet food and just shovelled the hot ash out. The shape suits
    the stove ok and has high sides. Plenty of different sizes on ebay but found mine in pound land or similar store.
    Atb Terry

  21. #21
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    Stove blacking might help keep it looking smart, it will deter rust up to a point. (Not if you leave it out in the rain)

  22. #22

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    Thanks for the tips for maintaining the condition. Iam still yet to light it. But looking at it, it would be quite easy to make a hot smoker where the round lid lifts off. I've put a few bits aside and plan having a go at some point. Probably spring next year tbh. But has anyone else done similar, or considered it? Or more importantly spotted any reason why it wouldn't be advisable?

    Cheers
    On Twitter @grumpybutcute

  23. #23
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    I got the tray made up with a local fabricator, I am sure you could find something yourself or have something made it is just a flat bit of steel with sides when I get a min I will post a pic. It has a handle which allows me to slide it out and put the ash somewhere safe, usually if it is not warm, I put it under a hedge, as I only burn wood and little else.

    They are good stoves for what they are, also keep mine in a sturdy plywood box (picture will also follow) this fits in the tubes and bits and bobs etc

    Dave

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