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Thread: New camera

  1. #1
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    Really excited with my latest purchase. As my photography is "self-funding" I'm never really guilty about buying new kit. Just took delivery of my brand spanking new Pentax K-1 "limited edition" with 15-30mm Pentax wide angle lens. I do have quite a bag of Pentax lenses and it helped my decision to buy the new body that quite a few actually work fully with the K-1 35mm full-frame sensor.
    The 15-30mm is one serious chunk of glass. I'm going to get arms like Garth carrying this combo around. It's heavy The 15-30 will likely be the "stay on" lens like my Sigma 10-20 is on my APS-C bodies.

    Without physically checking the reality I am led to believe that my 50mm prime, 77mm limited prime, 300mm prime and a couple of DA* zooms will fully cover the full-frame sensor. All of my other lenses will also work but only in crop mode. Should also be able to give the Asahi Pentax Takumar 135mm f2.5 prime an outing in manual mode!

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    Looking forward to seeing the results!
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

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    Nice one. Don't count on those old K mount lenses being any good on a 21st century FF digital - I have a couple and they are truly awful, but then I'm comparing them to my Fuji lenses, which is a bit unfair.
    Last edited by Duck Feet; 8th-November-2017 at 04:56 PM.
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    Hi Duckfeet, the only "old" K mount is the 135mm Takumar. The 300mm, 77mm Limited and 50mm primes are all digital age top notch glass. All three are scarily sharp on my K-7 body and allegedly cover full frame sensors at the same quality. I'll only know when I try them for real. They'll probably only get used occasionally anyway because my experience with the Sigma 10-20mm on the K-7 means that the Pentax 15-30mm will live on the K-1 for 95% of the time. The 77mm Limited is my "go to" lens for still life as it's the sharpest lens by far. The 300mm is also a beautifully sharp piece of glass for the stuff that's further away and the 50mm for anything in-between the 77 and the 15-30mm. I reckon I've got it all covered and if the Pro quality zooms do actually cover full frame I'm properly sorted.

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    Good stuff. Must admit, my first reaction was that the 15-30mm was a lot of money for an f2.8 that, judging by your portfolio, looks like it might not get used at anything wider than f8, but it's your baby so I hope it helps you produce some great images. I'm out of touch with Pentax digital, but I've got a lovely ME Super on my desk that I've had for 35 years and I'm just about to get some b&w film (remember film?) for a nostalgia session with a 50mm 1.7 Takumar. Some things don't change; I still love the 50mm focal length on my Fuji, it's a great environmental portrait combination. Unlike you, I'm not much of a landscape photographer (I shoot architecture and environmental portraits for clients), but I like looking at what other people can do... some of your stuff is very nice. Have you seen JuzaPhoto? It's an Italian website - lots of GREAT landscape photography there if you dig into it.
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.

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    Just been doing more research on PentaxForums and it appears that the 300, 77 and 50mm lenses do all work fully on the full frame K-1. The 77mm limited has just won "Best Pentax Lens of All Time" on the forum. Glad I've got one .
    JuzaPhoto has photography that I can only aspire to. Some absolutely incredible work there.
    Hope you have some fun with the ME super and a few rolls of B&W film. My last film camera was a Mamiya RB67 used in conjunction with a Weston Master IV and cone for incident light measurement. My favourite film was Fuji Velvia transparency film, 50 iso with wonderful colour rendition and detail to die for.

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    I believe I have my dad's ME Super somewhere at home....he donated it when he upgraded...probably 15 years ago, though I only used it for a short while before having a few years with little photography, most on a compact, then going digi. Before that, I had my uncle's old Pentax Spotmatic, with some superb fixed lenses. Made about 1970, I bought it in about '83 off him, and used it for at least 10-12 years. Still have it somewhere. I'm no technical photographer, more instinctive, but that Pentax was superb, the lenses pin sharp.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

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    Hi Mal, my photography started with Pentax and I have been reluctant to change marques ever since. When I first looked at digital I couldn't move until they got it right. My first Pentax digital was a K-10D, then upgraded to a K20-D, followed by a K-7 and now excited to be a K-1 owner. I just have to learn how to use it to it's potential as it's very different to those I've already got.

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    I use a Fuji X-T1. It's a lovely combination of nostalgia and modern technology - and Fuji make lenses for Hassleblad, so enough said. Feels like it's hewn from granite. Perfect for documentary / PJ type work and anything that doesn't move too quickly, like buildings. Super film simulations - Velvia, Astia, Kodachrome, etc etc. - it produces some of the best JPGs out there. I sold a Nikon D810 to buy it - from 36 to 16mpx and not a single regret. Not sure I want to take it paddling though.
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.

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    What made you move from full-frame back to APS-C? The lenses or the functionality of the body software?

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    Quote Originally Posted by meirion View Post
    What made you move from full-frame back to APS-C? The lenses or the functionality of the body software?
    The Fuji is small and discrete: less to lug around on a shoot and better for people photography - it intimidates nobody, so environmental portraits are more natural. Lenses are just better than Canikon. Functionality of the camera - it's just a pleasure to hold and use. Fuji specifically for the image quality - film sims and the quality of the JPGs means there's no need to shoot RAW (except maybe some architectural interiors). And the fact that with mirrorless, live view /EVF is now so good it can practically see in the dark and shows you almost exactly what you're getting in the final file - it's light years ahead of DSLR. And finally, nobody really needs 36 mph or even full frame... Steve McCurry was taking GREAT pictures with an 8mpx APS-C Nikon D300s... they're not suddenly bad pictures because full frame has been invented. I have to be careful not to 'rant' about FF and DSLR, but it's becoming a MPX arms race, with no real benefit to the consumer or professional.
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duck Feet View Post
    And finally, nobody really needs 36 mph or even full frame... Steve McCurry was taking GREAT pictures with an 8mpx APS-C Nikon D300s... they're not suddenly bad pictures because full frame has been invented.
    Agree completely with this sentiment but the full frame option for me means that I can now sell much bigger prints for a much larger personal profit and maybe even make my files more commercially desirable on the stock sites that I supply. Great pictures are great pictures whatever physical size they are. It's all really about talent at the end of the day, forget megapixels where quality of actual IMAGE is concerned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by meirion View Post
    It's all really about talent at the end of the day...
    I'm taking the above slightly out of context, but allow me to fundamentally, but cordially split hairs. I think the '10% inspiration and 90% perspiration' rule applies to photography - as it does throughout the so-called creative industries. Zillions of people have all sorts of talents, but most fail to appreciate, especially where creativity is concerned, that 90% of what appears as talent, is about hard graft, perseverance and simply getting yourself out there.
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duck Feet View Post
    I'm taking the above slightly out of context, but allow me to fundamentally, but cordially split hairs. I think the '10% inspiration and 90% perspiration' rule applies to photography - as it does throughout the so-called creative industries. Zillions of people have all sorts of talents, but most fail to appreciate, especially where creativity is concerned, that 90% of what appears as talent, is about hard graft, perseverance and simply getting yourself out there.
    I agree to a certain extent but without the artistic vision/talent in the first place the other 90% is a waste of time. You need the 10% to make the 90% worthwhile in my opinion. If that is true then I would once again state that it's talent that counts more than megapixels or any other factor. This statement does of course assume that the photographer/artist that has the 10% is willing to complete the 90% part as well.

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    Interesting one. I consider myself mostly an instinctive photographer, and have never really learnt the technical side properly, just by trial and error and a tiny amount of reading. However, I put a fair bit of effort in being somewhere with a camera at the right time. I think I small amount of luck should come into the formula too, though you maximise it by putting yourself into the right sort of places.
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    Hi Mal, luck is always an element for the unexpected but normally a small element if I'm honest. If luck was a big one then most top-notch photographers would only have two or three pics out there! I believe that it's mostly by design and vision but that's just my personal opinion. Most, if not all my portfolio (see link below) is not lucky, it's calculated and seen as having "commercial" potential, be it "wall art" or "stock usage". This is definitely NOT to say that I fall into the category of "top-notch" (I know my place) but I feel that I do have the eye for a commercial image (on a small scale)............

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    Nothing of value to add meirion but it's good to find another Pentax user. I do like the Sigma 10-20 but it isn't the "stay-on lens" for my K-5 II (APS-C). Being a bit snappy I tend to keep a Sigma 24-70 fitted and one other depending on whatever I expect to find. The Sigma 50mm prime and the Pentax 300 prime (incredible value and excellent for dragonflies) are my favourites and I think (don't rely on this) they are ok with full frame sensors.

    As I said, no help to you really but I always wave my camera strap at anyone I see carrying a Canon or Nikon. On a boat, I never dare to carry such valuable kit even in the calm waters I paddle so I only take my Fujifilm X30.

    I don't really wave anything at anyone, it's all just a fantasy. Perhaps I should use that as my post signature?

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    ... I've just looked at your portfolio and wow! Please tell me that for some of the landscapes you use HDR software, otherwise I really should give up and stick to a smartphone and blown-out skies.

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    Hi Steve, not a big fan of HDR usage but I have to admit to a great deal of sky replacement. I must admit that I have a habit of photographing skies for my "catalogue". I will then replace a boring sky with a more interesting one (layers) from the collection. It's sometimes quite difficult to match the direction of the light but I try my best to match highlights and shadows

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    I think I small amount of luck should come into the formula too, though you maximise it by putting yourself into the right sort of places.
    These images (by a friend of mine) illustrate that point pretty well. A lot of work went into getting to the right place at the right time, but sometimes you're still at the mercy of nature, or events beyond which you've no control (like in photojournalism):

    https://craigeaston.wordpress.com/20...r-more-dreich/
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.

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    Congratulations on your new body Meirion. I have always liked the feel of Pentax bodies although have used canon since my first 35mm slr, a practika, died many years ago.
    My oldest dslr, a 1Ds2, is now on its last legs after 11 years of abuse, but I have too much investment in lenses and bodies to justify jumping systems, so will be looking for another used 1Ds3 to join my existing one, or maybe a 5D3. Secondhand there is only a couple of hundred pounds difference in price, and the 5D3 is now weatherproofed and has better low-light performance.
    As regards, luck, artistic talent and technical ability, I would say that the technical stuff has never been easier to grasp. In-camera metering is so much better than it used to be, and the histogram allows you to immediately review your exposure to make sure you got it how you wanted. Autofocus takes away even that small manual task. It all leaves you so much freer to use the depth of field and shutter speed creatively. (That said, I still take pride and enjoyment from getting it right in-camera, and prefer to fiddle about with filters in the field than on a computer at home afterwards!)
    I'm with Mal on this - a lot of effort goes into getting to the right place at the right time with a camera in hand. Then a sense of composition and artistic interpretation comes in. My first solo exhibition is fast approaching - February next year, so I will find out the hard way if my art has any commercial value!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Hewitt View Post

    On a boat, I never dare to carry such valuable kit even in the calm waters I paddle so I only take my Fujifilm X30.

    I don't really wave anything at anyone, it's all just a fantasy. Perhaps I should use that as my post signature?

    I was of the same view, initially. My Canon is a more modest DSLR than yours, but to me it was a big outlay. After a little while protecting it so much I wasn't using it, I simply decided I wanted the photos from the water to be just as good as those on land, so bought a Peli StormCase for it. It is superb and utterly bombproof/waterproof - it has been upside down through a number of rapids. The camera therefore always comes with me, though there are occasions due to bounciness or rain that it never comes out and the little Olympus TG2 gets used from my pocket. Yes, you have to take a bit of extra care, but once you have a little routine, its only out of the case for a short time and its really quick to deploy.




    Quote Originally Posted by Duck Feet View Post
    These images (by a friend of mine) illustrate that point pretty well. A lot of work went into getting to the right place at the right time, but sometimes you're still at the mercy of nature, or events beyond which you've no control (like in photojournalism):

    https://craigeaston.wordpress.com/20...r-more-dreich/
    I do like those. Patience obviously plays a part, and knowledge of where to be and when to go, but there's definitely an element of luck involved. I've been hoping to have a swan land right in front of me, coming straight at me, ever since I've been paddling (9 years). Yesterday it finally happened;











    Luck was definitely involved, but the awareness of it being about to happen, and the knowledge of what settings I wanted and how to quickly get to them played a big part. Also the quickness of the Peli Case opening!
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

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    Very nicely captured, the swan!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon G View Post
    That said, I still take pride and enjoyment from getting it right in-camera, and prefer to fiddle about with filters in the field than on a computer at home afterwards!
    Agreed. Authenticity and integrity always gets my vote - for all types of photography, which is why my first love is for documentary-style / PJ work. I want a sense of connection - for the image to tell me what it might have felt like to be there. Not all (not much) 'commercial' photography is about that, of course.

    I accept that you can go too far in the field with filters, but there's nowt wrong with a judicious use of NDs and temperature control. Whereas HDR and too much highlight and shadows post processing, leaves me stone cold. I guess, with the advent of gaming, what I call Harry Potter style HDR is popular with the masses right now... he said in the most pompous tone he could muster!

    A couple of really good books for natural landscape imagery are the Lee Filters books. Some really nice work in those, with explanations of technique - and quite inexpensive.

    Good discussion chaps! And like a complete mirrorless hypocrite, I actually found myself drooling over a Nikon D700 yesterday... possibly THE classic of the digital era so far? Nothing wrong with having TWO systems I was telling myself.
    Last edited by Duck Feet; 10th-November-2017 at 04:35 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duck Feet View Post
    I accept that you can go too far in the field with filters, but there's nowt wrong with a judicious use of NDs and temperature control. Whereas HDR and too much highlight and shadows post processing, leaves me stone cold.
    Does anyone remember nicotine filters for moody skies, or those starburst filters? Fortunately they seem to have dropped out of fashion! I guess the less subtle HDR effects will go the same way with time...

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    ^^^ I thought we'd seen the last of starburst filters, but only yesterday a client showed me some exterior pictures of their offices taken by 'a professional photographer' complete with said starbursts. Thankfully, the client thought they were awful and we agreed I'd shoot it instead. Respectable photographers should make it their mission to rid the world of starbursts and tobacco filters!
    I'm at that difficult age... somewhere between birth and death.

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    I had a starburst filter for my Pentax. God knows why, maybe it was part of a pack or something, can't believe I bought it deliberately as I've never really used filters other than the basics. Used it once, presumably its been in a box since 1988 somewhere.
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    f16

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    I don't think that HDR in it's real form is the problem. The real shocker is the "Tone Mapping" that people do on top. The NUCLEAR option appears to be really popular and I really hope it dies very soon. It's nothing but a novelty in my humble opinion. Then again I thought that rap music was just a fad but that's hanging in there unfortunately

    Love a good photography discussion. So many different genres and brand loyalties always leads to great discussion.

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    Filters, back in the day I had a whole set of those glass ones that you slid into grooves on a plastic holder. Can't remember the name of the brand now but they got used extensively for a short period of time and then gathered dust for a long period of time.!
    The polarizer was useful though, to be fair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by meirion View Post
    Filters, back in the day I had a whole set of those glass ones that you slid into grooves on a plastic holder. Can't remember the name of the brand now but they got used extensively for a short period of time and then gathered dust for a long period of time.!
    That's what mine were like for the Pentax. Only used the polariser, but it was a pain in the arse as you couldn't pop it back in the bag with it still on...
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    Cokin, they're the ones. Yes Mal, pain in the behind if your bag wasn't right!!!!!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by meirion View Post
    Cokin, they're the ones. Yes Mal, pain in the behind if your bag wasn't right!!!!!!!!
    That was in the days of my old CCS padded bag. Quality bit of kit, still have it, better padding than my LowePro, but just not big enough for the current camera and lens.


    I'm vaguely remembering that I might actually have bought the starburst thing myself, a moment of poor judgement, but I was only young.
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    You could even buy them from the Cokin range that gave you different numbers of bursts!!!!!!!!!!

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    PS Mal, love the splash-down swan pics.

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    Cokin effects filters - I remember those sets. Horrible things, even the nd grads gave a strong colour cast. Lee filters are my main ones now, mostly standard nd grads. I do have some reverse nd grads - really useful for sunsets over water - and a polariser which I rarely use.

    Photographic fads will always come and go. The 'big stopper' shot seems to be prevalent among landscapers at the moment. As with all techniques, it can work well (I do enjoy a slow exposure of moving water myself) but it seems to be used all over the place just now...

    Edit : make that most techniques. There was never a place for tobacco or coral filters, let alone starbursts!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    I believe I have my dad's ME Super somewhere at home....
    I have my old ME Super, unfortunately it's as dead as a dodo ... I then bought a Pentax digital SLR so I could still use my lenses ... then I acquired a Pentax screw thread Takumar 500mm f4.5 lens and the adapters to mount it to my dSLR ... you may be in range
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon G View Post
    Cokin effects filters - I remember those sets. Horrible things, even the nd grads gave a strong colour cast. Lee filters are my main ones now, mostly standard nd grads. I do have some reverse nd grads - really useful for sunsets over water - and a polariser which I rarely use.

    Photographic fads will always come and go. The 'big stopper' shot seems to be prevalent among landscapers at the moment. As with all techniques, it can work well (I do enjoy a slow exposure of moving water myself) but it seems to be used all over the place just now...

    Edit : make that most techniques. There was never a place for tobacco or coral filters, let alone starbursts!
    The "big stopper" shots are a little too unreal for my personal taste. I've never seen the sea looking like a misty fog pouring into shore sorry! Moderation in all things is the secret

    Quote Originally Posted by Potty Paddler View Post
    I have my old ME Super, unfortunately it's as dead as a dodo ... I then bought a Pentax digital SLR so I could still use my lenses ... then I acquired a Pentax screw thread Takumar 500mm f4.5 lens and the adapters to mount it to my dSLR ... you may be in range
    500mm, I hope you've got a good mono/tri..pod or at least a nice beanbag to lay that weapon on. I've got 5 stops of shake reduction but I doubt that's even enough to grab sharp shots with my shaky hands!!!!!!!!!

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