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Thread: Inverpolly as wilderness like as youll get in the UK youd think.

  1. #1
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    Default Inverpolly as wilderness like as youll get in the UK youd think.



    6 days out in the wilds. The winds were fierce, the rain was wet, portaging was tough all was just as it should be until arriving on the big island on Loch Sionascaig. What we found was a large fire ring - complete with charred wood and foil; loosely collected fire wood scattered around; a white plastic bag of kindling, 2 blackbags, sealed up that felt like they contained more kindling; a bench fashioned out of cut wood and string; a tree cut to about 7ft with all branches removed (I imagine as support for a tarp); and a huge spread of axe chippings looking like a couple of beavers had taken part in a tree shredding competition.

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    5 years ago we had camped at this spot and left it, as far as we could, like wed not been there

    I cant explain why this was all left there. Id imagine that people visiting the area are there for the wildness and unspoilt nature.Someone had been to a bit of trouble to assemble this lot.
    Whoever it was must have come by water, and with the necessary portages, made a determined effort to be there. Why would they leave this?
    Some operators do run trips to Inverpolly and I suppose this could have all been left for their next clients. If this was left by an operator they should be ashamed in fact who ever left it should be ashamed.

    Leave no trace by:
    taking away all your litter
    removing all traces of your tent pitch and of any open fire (follow the guidance for lighting fires)
    not causing any pollution.

    Lightingfires. Never cut down or damage trees. If you must have an open fire keep it small and under control and remove all traces before leaving

    If you are exercising access rights, look after the places you visit and enjoy,and leave the land as you find it.

    Looking back, I wish I had disassembled the whole lot, but I left it. I wish I hadnt. I suppose I might have abused the access code by not doing so.

    Sam

  2. #2
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    Totally agree. There was a small ring there in 2015 when I was last there, none in 2010 when I first went there. We camped further into the woodland area in 2015 and hopefully you wouldn't have known we'd been there.

    Sadly, some folk seem to think that they are showing off "bushcraft skills" by doing this, not realising that bushcraft is all about respecting the environment, which this is clearly not doing. Disappointingly, we found a few spots in Norway that were like this, (e.g. wooden furniture cut from fresh trees), I'd hoped folk there were better educated in the outdoors.

    Even sadder is the fact they almost definitely arrived by canoe
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  3. #3
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    People who do this sort of thing are utterly selfish and disrespectful of everybody who goes out to enjoy the wildness of Scotland (or anywhere else for that matter).

    In their actions they have stolen the experience of being in a place not spoilt by human activity from everyone who follows after them.

  4. #4
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    There was a fire site when I was there in June this year but nothing else.


    But, just to present the alternative argument:

    If there's an existing fire site, I use it and don't get too self riteous about it, especially in fairly heavily used sites like that one. In fact, I'd go so far as to say it's probably better to have a "fixed" fire site under those circumstances. I bet someone is there most weekends through the summer. In fact, I wonder how long humans have been having fires there for because it's a logical "harbour" spot on that island. I wonder how deep you'd need to dig before you stopped finding ashes?

    What annoys me is when you see loads of small fire circles dotted around the place when they could have used an existing one that was already there. You can usually tell if I've been there because I'll have taken the circle apart and re-arranged it much smaller and as a linear fire pit.

    No excuse for cutting down trees though.

    You are of course assuming it was canoeists and not fishermen. We portaged wood in and I wouldn't do it again, it was REALLY hard work. Fishermen would have driven in by quad/4x4 to boat bay.

    Where's the line though? Do I need to get angry because there are smears of royalex on the rocks on and around the portages and landing sites?

    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkwheel View Post
    There was a fire site when I was there in June this year but nothing else.


    But, just to present the alternative argument:

    If there's an existing fire site, I use it and don't get too self riteous about it, especially in fairly heavily used sites like that one. In fact, I'd go so far as to say it's probably better to have a "fixed" fire site under those circumstances. I bet someone is there most weekends through the summer. In fact, I wonder how long humans have been having fires there for because it's a logical "harbour" spot on that island. I wonder how deep you'd need to dig before you stopped finding ashes?

    What annoys me is when you see loads of small fire circles dotted around the place when they could have used an existing one that was already there. You can usually tell if I've been there because I'll have taken the circle apart and re-arranged it much smaller and as a linear fire pit.

    No excuse for cutting down trees though.

    You are of course assuming it was canoeists and not fishermen. We portaged wood in and I wouldn't do it again, it was REALLY hard work. Fishermen would have driven in by quad/4x4 to boat bay.

    Where's the line though? Do I need to get angry because there are smears of royalex on the rocks on and around the portages and landing sites?
    My problem is not with the fire site, but rather the mess that was with it and the cut trees.
    I understand what you are saying about fire sites, and I do re use them. If they are obviously established, I leave them - clean.
    We portaged all our wood for the trip in, as from experience we know how hard it is to find any wood which is dry and will give off heat. I can't think it was fishermen - the axe chippings were also present at the deserted cottage on the portage over to Veyatie. As you say, 4x4 to boat bay is much easier than walking with boats and packs, and is the obvious return journey too.

    I do feel bad about leaving royalex on rocks - I suppose a can of thinners and a scrubbing brush should also be in my kit list ; There is a rock on the Veyatie - Sionascaig portage that now has green, red and maroon royalex on it - but only the maroon is from my boat!

    Sam

  6. #6
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    Summer before last I went up the wye from monmouth. Overnighted about 6/800m above symonds yat on the bank river left opposite a campsite. River low good spot an island at this level. Carrier bags with faeces tied hanging from branches.
    Broken bottles and the usually empty beers cans. It ain’t good..

  7. #7
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    This could be plain ignorance, wannabe Ray Mears'y types.


    Quote Originally Posted by samB View Post

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    Sam
    I/we have a simple rule for campsites that I/we use: leave it in a condition that we would like to find it in.

    Maybe be we leave the odd foot print here and there, possibly some flat grass where the tent has been: both will disappear in a short space of time.
    If we have some surplus fire wood, we pile it up in a sheltered spot for the next weary traveller.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

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