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Thread: How does weight limit effect handling?

  1. #1
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    Question How does weight limit effect handling?

    Hi All,


    I read a review comparing the The Fatyak Kaafu Vs The Perception Scooter:-


    http://www.h2outdoor.co.uk/devon-blo...ption-scooter/


    I'm just wandering if with my own weight of 115kgs, then Wetsuit (wet), PFD etc, that it would push me over the 130kgs weight limit and adversely effect handling?


    Thanks

    Last edited by Maverick777; 15th-October-2017 at 08:20 AM. Reason: Link Required

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maverick777 View Post
    [...]
    How does weight limit effect handling?
    • Less manoeuvrable
    • Wetter in waves
    • Possibly less stable
    • More resistance going forward (harder paddling)


    It is better to have a canoe that is a bit bigger than you need than smaller,
    unless you know exactly what you are doing,
    but then you don't need my advice
    An occasional overload of about 10% can be acceptable if
    you accept and act according to the limitations of that.

    Dirk Barends

  3. #3
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    Makes Sense. Thanks.

  4. #4
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    There are really two answers to this.

    "Weight limit" is fairly undefined across the industry. It basically means how much weight the Canoe will carry and still have "sufficient" freeboard; freeboard being hull side above the waterline. There’s no standard as to how much is safe and, anyway, it’ll vary according to use and water state. On a dead calm day, on a flat lake, you might be happy with only a couple of inches to spare. Not much chance of the Water sloshing in. On a windy wavey day on the same lake, you might feel you need a good nine inches before it’s not coming over the edges.

    As to weight and handling, that’s a scale. One Canoe will handle differently for you solo with no kit that you two up, or you with the camping gear loaded. I’ve got Canoes which, when paddled by me, track in a dead straight Line but when paddled by a small woman will never go in a straight line. Same Canoe. Same weight imit.

    As your Canoe sits empty on the water, look at the waterline. It’s possible that only the middle of the boat will Be in the water. That bit is typically nice and rounded. You could spin the Canoe around it’s own length easily. It’s manoeuvrable. Add some weight, and the ends of the Canoe start to touch the Water. It’s got quite a lot longer and won’t turn as easily. Really load it up and both stems (the ends) will be in the Water acting like rudders and trying to keep you dead straight.

    Same Canoe. Different handling.

  5. #5
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    With SOT kayaks as in the OP, the main difference with extra weight will be reduced stability and wetter ride. However, too little weight means there's more to catch the wind. In the linked review it says:

    the Perception has a higher max capacity load and we found that as soon as we had anyone in the kayak of more than around 14 stone, they were much more unstable and were getting a very wet bottom! This extra buoyancy did however mean that we were sitting slightly higher in the perception and found that we were slightly more prone to being blown by the wind than in the Fatyak
    Interesting that the review found a difference above 14st (about 88kg) while the capacity is quoted at 130kg.

    Whether a boat is suitable for you depends also on the kind of use you're planning - in wind and small waves (lakes) you might want less volume, in waves but less wind (sea) you might want more.

  6. #6

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    If one of the trial boats was a Bic Ouassou, that probably gave a slightly false sense of security. The Bic is as wide as a house, and stable to match. I never managed to tip mine, much as I tried in normal circumstances (not big surf), and the width matters with SOTs. Straight line tracking was suboptimal, but stability was awesome. I reckon the FatYak is narrower, and with a different underwater hull profile.

    The Ouasssou has a profile almost like 3 sponsons with channels between them which is more stable than a more "hull" shaped profile of the Kaafu. Weight probably does make a difference too, but they are fundamentally very different boats.

  7. #7
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    My weight is about 115 kg, down from 118 kg. So add the weight of a wet wet-suit, gloves, booties, phone radio, PFD, Crazy Creek Seat (Wet) and bits and bobs, I would guess, I'm way over the limit, in fact I took the seat off and but on my mates SOT, that lost a bit of weight and reduced my center of gravity which helped.

  8. #8

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    It may be worth looking at a tandem SOT if SOT is the way you want to go, look for one that has a central seat as an option for soloing, something like the RTM Ocean Duo.

  9. #9
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    Hi,

    Thanks for the tip on a tandem. But the weight and length become an issue and I still want the maneuverability of a single to have fun in the surf. I'm swaying towards the Wilderness Tarpon 120 with a weight limit of 159 kgs, 29 kgs more than the FatYak.

    Regards

  10. #10

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    I know a few kayak anglers who have Tarpon 120s and who seems to take everything including the kitchen sink with them when they go out, so it is a good stable carrying platform. At 12 foot it will be at the upper edge of maneuvreable, but having confidence in the capacity of your yak will make you more comfortable at that edge.

    Try it and see how you get on with it, and post some bloggs here when you do!

  11. #11
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    Question

    Hi,

    I liked the Wilderness Tarpon 120 for itís stability and the very comfortable adjustable seat. Itís Achilles heel was the leaking orbital hatches. I had the hatch replaced and that even leaked. I was told by Palm UK that leaks in a boat were to be expected. I expect the Captain of the Titanic thought the same. Also it was a heavy beast. Shame, otherwise, I would have kept it. Iím going to try the 100. Iíve just tried a Dagger Blackwater 10.5 but found it to small. What else can you recommend that would be better for someone that is 6í2Ē and 17 stone?

    Cheers

  12. #12
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    https://www.americanpaddler.com/kayaks-for-big-guys/

    There are a huge number of potential options - really depends on what you want to do.
    This post may vanish at any moment.

  13. #13
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    Like the following:-

    Old Town Vapour 12XT

    Dagger Axis 12

    neither seem available in the UK. Shame.

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