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Thread: Most grabbed paddle?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    Default Most grabbed paddle?

    What's your favourite paddle? I know that a lot of folk here will slip seamlessly between deep water and bouncy stuff but what is your "go to" stick?

    While we're waiting for our Downcreek Avocets to arrive we are using Grey Owl Voyageurs (not happy with varnish finish!). What's your fave?

  2. #2
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    That's not an easy question to answer, and for me it would depend on the conditions I'm paddling in.
    In calm conditions in deep enough water, it would be my Downcreek Swan every time.
    For everyday use in any conditions, it would be my Grey Owl Sugar Island. I'm certain I could find a better do it all paddle, but it's what I have and it's reliable.
    One other paddle I take along quite often, either as a back up, or if it's windy, is my Grey Owl bent shaft. I'm certain there's better bent shafts out there, but it's what I bought initially to see if I liked a bent shaft. It wasn't expensive and it gets the job done.

    If you don't like a varnished finish on your paddle, sand down the shaft (leave the varnish on the blade for better protection) and oil with Danish oil or similar. An oiled shaft has a much better feel to it that a varnished one.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

  3. #3
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    Grey owl Guide.

    As above. I sanded down the shaft and oiled it because I was geting blisters on my top hand by rotating the grip when doing Indian stroke. Left the blade varnished.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

  4. #4
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    Currently a Bending Branches Sunburst. Glass clad laminated blade, tapered carbon shaft, laminated pear grip. Smoooooth

  5. #5
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    I have a downcreek paddle a greyowl one and a home made beaver tail. All of them get used and I like them all for different reasons. But no matter which of them I choose to take, they are always accompanied by my Ainsworth c100. It's my go to paddle. If only because the handle makes a great hook when reaching for ropes, or the bank to pull me close, it's a tool that I always carry. It's taken a real bashing over the years but the glass shaft is a delight to hold on a cold day and it's a real shovel to move water when I need it either on a river or a windy Lough.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  6. #6
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    Similar to Big Al my go to paddle is an Ainsworth C100, it's always in my boat and the one I choose on rivers. I love my grey owl guide and have just oiled the shaft but it doesn't get used on rivers.

    I must be honest I'm not convinced with wooden paddles after trying and failing to re varnish an old Carlisle paddle. They're lovely but so is carbon fibre

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Surrey
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    I've several paddles now, but the "go to" is definitely my Downcreek Lapwing. Whilst it is theoretically a deep water blade, it transfers more power than many slimmer ottertails, but not so much as to be tiring over extended periods.

    I have a lovely Edenwood Ottertail that is beautiful to use, but only really gets used for days when I'm just drifting and playing about, not when I want to get anywhere.

    For whitewater, I used to have a carbon Ophion spooned blade. I was not at all convinced I'd like a spooned blade, but it came up second hand. It was brilliant, so light, so powerful. Sadly I lost it, they're no longer made, and I haven't yet found a happy replacement. I'm using a Celtic split blade paddle (carbon 4-pc shaft, poly blade) which is surprisingly good at its job, but lacks the feel of the Ophion. I bought this for use with the Ally folding canoe, but have found it good enough to be my main alternative to the Lapwing, for now at least.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Ilkeston, United Kingdom
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    Default

    Still have an old plastic / aluminium ainsworth paddle that is the go-to on trips - then have a Grey Owl wooden paddle stowed in the boat for deep water.

    In the arsenal I have a number of carbon blades, a couple of plastic blades and my own handmade wooden paddle, but the ainsworth goes with me on most trips! Indestructible work horse :-)

  9. #9
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    Almost always my Redtail from John Bell - probably the best paddle I have ever had (and that's a lot.... ).....


  10. #10
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    Dec 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8r View Post
    Almost always my Redtail from John Bell - probably the best paddle I have ever had (and that's a lot.... ).....

    I have one of those too and really like it except for the asymmetric hand grip. I just can't take to it.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  11. #11
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    Depends on personal style, I think. I always palm-roll my top hand, and I find the grip is great for that. But, if you used a wrist-turn technique I can see where it wouldn't work that well.

  12. #12
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    Mar 2016
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    North Lancashire, South Lakes
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    My Edenwood 'Ottertail' in deep water. I have a Grey Owl 'Voyageur' for when it's shallow or rocky. I stripped the varnish off it and oiled it. I really can't get on with varnish.
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!

  13. #13
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    Mar 2008
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    North Devon
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    My Cherry Grey Owl Sagamore goes everywhere. Not just in 'deep' water but on shallowish rivers (I don't do full on whitewater) I was concerned by its delicate appearance, and initially treated it with respect avoiding contact with the river bottom, trees and banks etc, but it's proved to be as tuff as old boots, with no structural damage despite many years of hard use and abuse. Like many others I also have a C100 amongst other wooden bought and homemade paddles, The C100 gets used as a prodder/shovel/Tarp pole/undergrowth beater, but I just don't get on with it as a paddle. The other wooden paddles go out from time to time, but the Sagamore is by far my favourite.
    Paul
    Just goin with the flow

  14. #14
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    Feb 2017
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    Derbyshire
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    My guilty secret is a homemade jobby, a spooned blade (half a double ender), carbon shaft from an old fishing pole and a 'T' handle off a broken lawn edger. Total cost 4.
    It controls the Pack really well.
    Grey Owl Sprite is me fave for the Bob.

  15. #15
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    Dec 2006
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    I have a paddle that a friend made me about 6 years ago: the scalloped grip allows me to alter my grip if the desire takes me.


    For nice gentle cruising



    And my trust Nantahalla, a tough cookie I can paddle with all day every day, I sometimes forget to swap to my deep water paddle.
    It also doubles up as a weed cutter should I need to make a path.



    or for when I need to put the power down and/or in shallow water

    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  16. #16
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    Nov 2008
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    Lingfield Surrey
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    My default paddle is one of my old slalom racing blades. Large curved blade area tapered shaft (was bowman in C2 as well as C1) Kevlar Carbon construction.
    I have one of Jude's Pintails that I use if just slowly cruising solo or tandem but my problem is when I'm not concentrating I revert to slalom style and that isn't good for unprotected wooden shafts.
    I have lots of paddle that I do use for different boats and types of paddling.


    https://photos.app.goo.gl/YhXyVaP7svPyEO1x1




    www.pkpaddlesport.co.uk
    Coaching, leading and supporting Paddlesport.
    Plastic welding and repairs.


  17. #17
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    Nov 2008
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    Sorry for double post still can't get photos to load properly.
    Last edited by Yellow boat; 27th-September-2017 at 08:13 PM.




    www.pkpaddlesport.co.uk
    Coaching, leading and supporting Paddlesport.
    Plastic welding and repairs.


  18. #18
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    Jan 2014
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    S. Yorkshire
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    Oiled Grey Owl Chieftain, bought secondhand and still going strong, although the blade is appreciably narrower than it used to be after a few years of sanding nicks and chips out of the edges.
    It is light and flexible enough to paddle all day, but despite its fine blade does survive being used for poling in the shallows too. I swap to my sugar island for prolonged shallows or rocky bits, and if I'm in the OC1, I use a nantahlla.
    Last edited by Gordon G; 29th-September-2017 at 08:19 AM. Reason: typo

  19. #19
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    This piece of magic. Build by a friend. It does a lot. freestyle touring ruddering when sailing solo tandem going fast or slow. i just do no dare it on moving water.
    Most times other paddels join in. but this will be there
    Propper writing in English. How do you do that? with dyslexia, bad hand eye coordination, ect. and in a foreign language.
    Sorry for all the mistakes.

  20. #20
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    Oxfordshire
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    My Downcreek Kingfisher is the one I tend to paddle with mostly but if it gets too shallow or I want some power I swap to the Downcreek Big Dipper. For rocky or white water it's a Ainsworth C100.
    Bootstrap
    There's no such thing as inclement weather - you're just incorrectly dressed

  21. #21
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    Mar 2008
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    Dumbarton
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    Ah well, that would depend on which boat I was using....

    Slalom C1 and OC1 - VE C1 paddle (in shallow water, the older more worn one)
    Apache 16 - VE C1 paddle or a wooden Mitchell (US) river running paddle that I forget the name of.
    Kayak: Slalom and WWR - Double Dutch Kinetic Crank (quite new, replaces a Galasport Naja max which I liked but it delaminated)
    Kayak: Freestyle and River Running - Lendal/Celtic Kinetic XTi (4-piece cranked split because I really need to sort out a shaft for a 1-piece but keep forgetting)
    Kayak: Sea - Lendal Kinetic Touring Crank

    How hard can it be?

  22. #22
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    The one that is nearly always in my canoe is my Werner Nantahala, what is paired with depends on which canoe, what I'm doing and what I feel like at the time.
    DCUK
    Can't ytpe or roopf read

  23. #23
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    Robin Hood's Bay,Yorkshire
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    All my paddles are hand made - by me. My favourite is a beaver tail made from very light redwood timber. Its a tad lighter than commercially made ones - and I use it in white water. It'll be doing the TyneTour again this year. (so will I )
    http://www.davidwperry.blogspot.co.uk/

  24. #24

    Default

    Have bought an 87-inch Leader Marine paddle following this paddle guide a couple of months back. It cost me something like 35 bucks. I am a beginner and know that this isn't the best paddle in the world, but it has satisfied me so far. It seems decently strong, but I am not sure about the plastic blades. But I like that it has adjustable feathering.

  25. #25
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    Aug 2009
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    I guess i should update this. Downcreek (freebies) ww big dipper every single time now

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using Tapatalk

  26. #26
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    Mar 2016
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    North Lancashire, South Lakes
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    Easy for me. My beautiful Edenwood 'Ottertail, of which I now have to take particular care!
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!

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