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Thread: sorting out some birch polypore

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    near Newcastle
    Posts
    2,603

    Default sorting out some birch polypore

    I was out and about the other day, just walking in the local woodland with the other half/mrs/swmbo/wife/etc etc and I spotted some nice fresh polypore on a dead birch at a very accessible height so decided that I'd collect a few next time I was down there.


    I took a plastic carrier bag and made a point of heading in the right direction from the car park and collected a few choice samples for processing.



    It's just a matter of allowing them to dry naturally over the autumn/winter now and come next april/may time they'll be ready to use.


    Now paddling a Gumotex Palava 400 and LOVING IT! (I should have bought one years ago!!! )

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    76

    Default

    Must try this. I can feel a walk in the forest coming on.

    Do you use the dried strips like fire lighters?

    Mike

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    near Newcastle
    Posts
    2,603

    Default

    For firelighting purposes you generally slice off a thinish piece of material and use it as an "ember extender" when using a flint and steel kit. The initial ember being transferred from your charcloth (which burns out quite quickly in most cases) to the folded polypore allows you a lot more time to blow the ember to flame.

    You can shred it with a grater to make a form of tinder which will take a spark from a ferro rod and ignite but the flames are comparatively short lived or You can also treat the polypore by soaking it hot wax to make a form of firelighter but there are better alternatives to be honest.

    A really good use for the dried strips is as a form of midge repellent, similar to the "mosquito" coils peddled in most outdoor shops. All you do is ignite the tip of a strip, blow out the flame leaving a glowing ember and place in a safe location (a forked twig or split stick for example) in or around your campsite and it will gently smoulder away for anything up to a couple of hours depending on its size. They do seem to work and the smoke is not too unpleasant. You can also use a whole dried fungus to carry an ember while travelling, be it by canoe or foot.


    Now paddling a Gumotex Palava 400 and LOVING IT! (I should have bought one years ago!!! )

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    19,713

    Default

    Thanks for sharing this, interesting.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

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