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Thread: New member in Devon

  1. #1

    Default New member in Devon

    Hi I'm new here and only recently bought my first canoe having been a hirer a few times over the years. I live in Devon, England. Planning river trips first in Devon and Cornwall and would welcome any good tips on places to put in on the Teign, Exe and Camel. I really want to explore the nooks and crannies of these rivers. My boat is an old 16' fibreglass in need of some TLC which will probably happen over the winter as I want to use it straightaway. I'm thinking of glassing in tanks fore and aft for buoyancy and dry stowage for maybe some short estuary/sea trips - is this a good/bad idea?

    Cheers

    Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Bangor, Co Down.
    Posts
    4,152

    Default

    Welcome to the forum, I'm afraid I cant help with location queries, but there are a few members in your area so I'm sure they can help you shortly.

    I agree with getting out in the canoe as soon as possible as long as its sea-worthy, you need to enjoy your new toy.

    As for glassing in tanks, I think you could avoid that job by just adding air bags or other buoyancy. The problem with tanks is if they get damage or leaks they can make your life awkward repairing them. They also take up useful storage space. A well filled drybag, tied in at the end will offer enough buoyancy should you take a tumble. But its horses for courses.

    In the meantime, enjoy your new boat and happy paddling. Don't forget to take pics and share your adventures on here, we love a good blog.
    Big Al.

    Only when the last tree has died
    and the last river been poisoned
    and the last fish been caught
    will we realise we cannot eat money.
    ~Cree Indian Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Exmouth, Devon, England
    Posts
    2,698

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    Hi Mike

    Welcome. I'm over in Exmouth.

    Built in buoyancy sounds like a very good idea. You'll even see it on some of the expensive canoes because it (I guess) it adds strength to the bow and stern.

    Hope to meet up on the water one day.
    Bernie

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Exmouth, Devon, England
    Posts
    2,698

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    And just like that you already have two different views.

    I think big Al has a point though. If you have any trouble with leakage, the "buoyancy tanks" will fill and be worse than not being there at all. Buoyancy blocks or the pump up versions (even a cheap gym ball properly secured) are easier to replace, or even remove if you want the extra space. But fiberglass has no natural buoyancy so you'll probably want something in there semi-permanently. Another option would be a long line with a buoy on the end so that if it does sink, you can retrieve it later.

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks both and my apologies for the late reply - I thought I had set up email alerts but apparently not properly! I had thought about bags but the purpose made type. I like the dry bag idea as it is dual purpose in the same way as I envisage the tanks would be - if I go that way I'll build-in hatches so that the tanks will double up as semi-dry storage. I have paddled the boat off Exmouth beach and, relative to the load and sea conditions, a lot of water came over the gunwales whilst we were negotiating the near-shore. I think this is partly technique but I'm now looking around at other people's boats to see if my gunwales are relatively low before I decide that this boat is a sea-going one one or not.

    Bernie - hooking up sounds great - I'll drop you a line next time we're heading out of Exmouth. We're away for a couple of weeks from today, hence my being on here, and taking the canoe along so now looking for tips on the Fal & Camel.

    Mike

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    4,772

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    You can get on the Camel from Wadebridge,there is a purpose built launching area in the corner of the big car park thats behind boots the chemist.I've also launched over at Rock but it's a bit of a carry from the car park down to the slip.Fal wise I've launched from Feock beach,easy peasy,and dirt cheap parking but you have to be there early as it's not a big car park.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    19,534

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    Hello and a belated Welcome!
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks Mal - good to be here! Thanks Marcus - I'll have two kids, 6 & 8, with me in a 16 footer and I think I'll be doing most of the paddling. I'm looking for something up and down on the tide, sedate but with a bit of interest for them - does the Camel from Wadebridge fit the bill? I'm a bit concerned that any nearer the river mouth might get too choppy for the kids. I was thinking that south coast estuaries might be better from a calm water point of view. Any tips or am I dreaming?! We're staying in St. Columb so happy to drive out pretty well anywhere.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    4,772

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    I'd say the Fowey would suit you better.The Camel in my opinion is a bit boring.Plenty to see on the Fowey.You can put in at Golant 2 hours before high water and paddle on the tide up to Lostwithiel and come back on the dropping tide.Plenty of wildlife and boats to see and you shouldn't get hassled by rental speed boats and water skiers.You can do the same trip from Fowey,you can use the slipway in the car park that serves the Bodinick ferry.Likewise you can go from Penmarlem boat yard on the other side of the river.Coming from St.Columb Golant would be ideal.

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