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Thread: Why are SUPs permitted but not kayaks at Sailing Clubs?

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    Question Why are SUPs permitted but not kayaks at Sailing Clubs?

    Having enquired around a few local sailing clubs based on the lakes and reservoirs in Northamptonshire I find that each one disallows kayak or canoe launch, but allows stand up paddle boards.

    Im just wondering what the criteria is, as surely a canoe or kayak is more swiftly manoeuvrable than a SUP in the unlikely event of near misses?

    Im genuinely confused.

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    Very interesting. I don't know the answer, but as an ex Commodore of one of the big clubs, I think it might be a historic thing. It took some time for dinghy clubs to accept windsurfing, but eventually the "all blown together" overcame the "no rudders, no sitting, no manners", and windsurfing membership and, crucially, instruction income broke down the barriers. I suspect that its the instruction bit that again has taken SUPs onto the preserve of the sailors.

    It may seem strange that grown adults pour huge amounts of time, effort and money on seeking to make boats go faster, round a specially established course with a set of complicated rules, but they do. The general objection to canoes and kayaks is the unpredictability of their movement, and hence their potential effect on the racing, whereas sailing is constrained by the course to be raced, the wind and the rules.

    What I can't explain, other than avarice on the part of sailing clubs, is the apparent acceptance of SUPs.

    Actually, my old club does have some canoes and kayaks, but they are for use by children in the expensive "body dumping courses" run during school hols to keep kids out of mischief, or at least focus on getting wet.

    Impcanoe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Impcanoe View Post
    It may seem strange that grown adults pour huge amounts of time, effort and money on seeking to make ....... go faster, round a specially established course with a set of complicated rules, but they do.
    Indeed, this might be said of so many sports. If we are talking about huge amounts of money, look at motorsports.

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    One thing comes to mind. If a paddle boarder falls off the board it is relatively easy to get back on and continue, ie self rescue - assistance generally unnecessary.

    However for canoes and kayaks this may not always be the case where the ability to self rescue is something not so easily acquired and assistance often needed.

    Also paddle boarders are not so likely to go out in conditions with larger waves and wind so less likely to get into the difficulties that might affect canoes and kayaks.

    Perhaps it is just a "safety" thing.

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    Quercus

    Remembering after reading your post the existence of Safety Audits, Risk Assessments etc I bet you are right. There are some very successful sailing and windsurfing instructors and coaches who have expanded their remit to include SUP. Quick plug for one such, Simon Winkley.

    Impcanoe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
    One thing comes to mind. If a paddle boarder falls off the board it is relatively easy to get back on and continue, ie self rescue - assistance generally unnecessary.

    However for canoes and kayaks this may not always be the case where the ability to self rescue is something not so easily acquired and assistance often needed.

    Also paddle boarders are not so likely to go out in conditions with larger waves and wind so less likely to get into the difficulties that might affect canoes and kayaks.

    Perhaps it is just a "safety" thing.
    I have frequently fallen out of both and can get back into both. I also sail and won the Captain Capsize trophy at my local club the first year I was there.

    I used to be able to get back into a kayak in under 30 seconds. Canoe and dinghy maybe about the same time on a good day

    Andy
    The river flows, flows to the sea
    Wherever that river flows, that's where I want to be

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    Andibs I am very impressed.

    If it is the reason, it would be a perceived thing, not the truth. Any dinghy sailor learns to capsize and right and re enter their boat. Young Topper sailors boast of a dry capsize, when only their feet get wet. In my time I could roll both kayak and decked C1, and be "rescued" or rescue, but I certainly couldn't empty and re enter a kayak on my own.
    I can do that in all the dinghies I have sailed.

    Impcanoe

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    Duplicate

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    Yeh yeh Adrian. I could do this in the pool, but the boat would be half full of water, and a real slog to the reservoir edge in real life. Of course I am nothing like as good a paddler as I am a dinghy sailor.
    Don't sea kayas have bulkheads keeping the cockpit small?

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    Indeed, Peter. I think that is why this technique is recommended in sea kayaks, the righted boat has a relatively small volume of water and the boats will either have an inbuilt pump or paddles will carry a hand pump. Longer touring kayaks are also sometimes built this way for use on lakes but I agree a 15' kayak full of water is not going to be easy to sit in and empty.

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    In my mind, I'm not sure that I have really understood why some sailing / teaching facilities have allowed SUPs onto their "cherished" waters . Earlier this summer I had to pass some time in Calais waiting for my booked ferry. In addition to visiting the Dover Patrol Memorial (look that up on Wiki) I watched sail training at the local pond. A very well equipped, but not so well looked after centre had single and two handed dinghies, windsurfers and foiling windsurfers(which are scarily fast) all on the water, with some very close calls as the wind strength severly tested some of the younger or smaller sailors. Much later, when all the sailing had finished, a small group of SUPers paddled gingerly round the perimeter of the lake. Just saying.

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    On a slightly different slant, my kayak club had an issue at the local recreation park with Blue-green algae.

    The alsgae is classed as toxic, so the sailors managed to continues sailing as they didn't automatically get their head wet when capsizing, but the kayaks were banned during algae episodes because if you fall in (roll over) you will always get a wet head and the possibility of ingestion or water up the nose. Such was the councils safety assessment. We don't use that park any more ;-)

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    Interestingly, SUPs are not permitted on all waterways available under the British canoeing agreement either.
    https://www.britishcanoeing.org.uk/guidance-resources/waterways-environment/access/licensing-arrangements/


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    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamC View Post
    Interestingly, SUPs are not permitted on all waterways available under the British canoeing agreement either.
    https://www.britishcanoeing.org.uk/guidance-resources/waterways-environment/access/licensing-arrangements/

    Utterly bizarre

    How is an SUP not a canoe/kayak?

    Is a high kneeling sprint C boat a sort of halfway house? - If you stand up to paddle your boat does this win you a ban?

    More fun http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/oth...rding-row.html
    This post may vanish at any moment.

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