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Thread: Soda Yeti 4x4 version... Any good?

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    Default Soda Yeti 4x4 version... Any good?

    Has anyone got one....is it any good looking at a 150
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

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    Need more info Bren. I assume you're talking diesel as I don't think they fitted a 150 petrol ? New or used ?
    I don't own one, but I have owned a couple of Skodas recently, both of which I liked a lot. I drove the Yeti base 1.2 petrol version some time back and it surprised me, in that it was quite quick up to 70mph, was quiet, comfortable and held the road well for a taller car.

    The thing to remember is that they are VWs under the skin and VWs are nowhere near as reliable as the company would have you believe. I do believe that more care is taken in the screwing together in the Skoda factory though.

    If it's a used diesel, then beware if comes within the range of engines affected by the VW emissions scandal. If it does then find out if the so called "fix" has been done. If it has, then don't buy the car. If it hasn't, then the car will be okay to buy, but don't get the "fix" done yourself - leave well alone.

    Whether new or used (and this applies to any make), if you're not doing substantial mileages, then steer clear of diesel. Also applies if you're doing mainly short journeys. Used diesels, unless properly looked after and serviced by their previous owner(s), can turn into a money pit because many people who bought diesel because the government told them it was a good idea, were not told how to look after them or about the inherent costs and possible problems that come with them.
    Apologies if I'm telling you how to suck eggs.

    P.S. Have a look at this link for more info; http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/skoda/yeti-2009/
    Also beware DSG gearboxes. Honest John (above) is not a major fan, and used ones can bring their own separate set of problems.
    If you don't need the height that the Yeti gives you, then the Octavia Scout with 4WD is a decent alternative.
    Last edited by OLD MAN; 3rd-May-2017 at 01:08 PM.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    does the fix adversely affect the car? the only reason I ask is our touran is due to go in for the fix, they say it wont affect the economy of it but I suspect that the "remap" will affect how it drives..is this the case?..



    ps I agree whole heartedly with the vw reliability myth...wheel brgs at 17k etc etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterB View Post
    does the fix adversely affect the car? the only reason I ask is our touran is due to go in for the fix, they say it wont affect the economy of it but I suspect that the "remap" will affect how it drives..is this the case?..



    ps I agree whole heartedly with the vw reliability myth...wheel brgs at 17k etc etc.
    Read this, http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/news/vol...emissions-fix/
    It's about Tiguans, but the range of VW engines are fitted in many different models.
    Apart from what you'll read here, there have been many stories of major problems with VW engines after the fix. I've seen most of them in the Honest John question and answer section. Some people say that he is too particular, but I've read him for many years now and find him very informative.
    And of course, the problems we talk about here are not of his making, they are the actual problems of his readers, which he logs to get a good understanding of how big a problem is.

    My view is this; The last Skoda I owned was a 2013 Superb which the dealer said needed a fix, but the VW UK website said it didn't !!
    I was more than happy with the way the car performed, and the fuel consumption - always measured using the brim to brim method- so why would I get a fix which would more than likely cause major problems which in many cases VW are disputing were caused by the fix.
    There have been too many of them across the range for this to be coincidence. If you're happy with the car as it is, leave well alone.
    There's going to be a lot of cars for sale in the used car market that have had the fix, and they're going be a pig for the next owner !! If I was in the market for a used VW, I'd be very careful which one I picked.

    If you need any more info, have a troll through the HJ website, there's loads of info about all sorts of car related things.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    Looking at leasing one.....so new.....and kind of restricted on which model because I need a car sharpish and these are the only 4x4 in stock. You're right it is diesel......but I do moderate mileage about 15k per annum
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

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    My mate has an Octavia and loves it. My wife has just got a 1.6tdi golf which is a beautiful engine. I like the yeti in a way. To be honest I'd go for it if the deals right

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using Tapatalk

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    I only opened this thread because I thought it was about a soft drink!

    Now I wish to God I'd joined those men when they were set ashore, but I chose a wild and a reckless life serving under Captain Moore.

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    I'd drink it!
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

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    I can only add that I'm another happy Skoda driver. My 62 plate 1.6 TDI Octavia is approaching 100k miles now, not put a foot wrong mechanically, one faulty handbrake sensor is the only fault so far. I have not had the "fix" done (don't tell the company I'm probably supposed to have). I may have the chance to buy it off the company soon, and won't hesitate to do so.


    15k is the distance I've always estimated to be the border between petrol and diesel for running costs - higher than that would have been diesel. However, the 4 x 4 nature may mean that boundary drops. I do about 22k ish p.a. so financially diesel makes most sense, though obviously the current advice had changed them from planet saviours to planet/people killers...
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    I only opened this thread because I thought it was about a soft drink!

    Far too fuzzy and liable to sugar tax
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    Quote Originally Posted by mayobren View Post
    Looking at leasing one.....so new.....and kind of restricted on which model because I need a car sharpish and these are the only 4x4 in stock. You're right it is diesel......but I do moderate mileage about 15k per annum
    Personally, and it is personally, if I wasn't towing a caravan I wouldn't have a diesel car, nor would I if I was doing 1500 miles per annum.
    However, you asked about the Yeti Bren, so I'd say that if you can get a decent leasing deal, I don't think you'd be disappointed with the car or the brand.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    Quote Originally Posted by OLD MAN View Post
    Personally, and it is personally, if I wasn't towing a caravan I wouldn't have a diesel car, nor would I if I was doing 1500 miles per annum.
    However, you asked about the Yeti Bren, so I'd say that if you can get a decent leasing deal, I don't think you'd be disappointed with the car or the brand.

    Addendum; the 1500 miles I wrote above should read 15,000 miles.

    Also, there's a replacement coming next year, so dealers won't want old stocks hanging around, so don't take any sales b------t !!
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    I only opened this thread because I thought it was about a soft drink!
    I thought it was about a farl. Toasted with butter and a couple of rashers of bacon. Fried egg is optional.
    Big Al.

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    15k is the distance I've always estimated to be the border between petrol and diesel for running costs
    For general info purposes, and because my OCD kicks in a lot (no reflection on your statement Mal), I believe the mileage threshold for making a diesel option viable is now around 23000 to 25000 miles per annum. When diesel fuel was substantially cheaper than petrol, a diesel car made more sense, but nowadays the differential has been eroded and there is nowhere near the clear cut case for choosing diesel. Diesel cars are somewhat more expensive to buy as well, so that must be factored in.
    Diesel still makes sense for some people and the type of driving they do, the distances they cover, how long they keep the car and what sort of deal they got when buying.

    For my own part as a private buyer and a lowish mileage driver nowadays, if I wasn't towing, a diesel with it's clogging DPF, possible burnt out turbos, dual mass flywheel problems and stinking fuel makes no sense at all. And this is as well as the impending extra costs that the government are likely to impose on diesel owners.

    Here's a copy of an article about whether to choose diesel or petrol. It doesn't really delve deeply enough into any of the major downsides of diesel ownership or tell you what to do to try and avoid them, but it does give a guide on what to choose if undecided.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Petrol or diesel? It's one of the first questions car buyers should resolve before they even get to body type, make or model. Which is better for you will depend on your preferences, budget and circumstances.
    Previous thinking about diesels being less refined and cheaper to run has become outdated, as technology cuts the difference between the two fuels. In short, diesel isn't always best for fuel economy, and petrol isn't always the most fun.
    There are three factors that determine the choice between a petrol car or a diesel one: fuel economy, running costs and driving preference.
    Economy

    Because British refineries have concentrated their efforts on producing petrol in recent years, diesel is noticeably dearer here than in other European countries; where CO2-related tax structures also add to diesel appeal (CO2 output being directly related to fuel consumption).
    A petrol car might deliver up to 30% less fuel economy than a diesel equivalent, but it still might end up being cheaper to own over three years (see Running Costs below). There's also a possibility that diesel will become more expensive still if discussions to tax fuel according to its energy content turn into reality: diesel contains around 10% more energy than petrol.
    One point to bear in mind when comparing official mpg figures, petrol or diesel, is that they're obtained in laboratories. For a more accurate representation of what you're likely to achieve in real-world motoring, What Car?'s True MPG provides fuel consumption figures obtained by real drivers on real roads.
    Running costs

    Running costs are a much bigger issue than fuel consumption. These costs include all the non-fuel factors such as servicing, insurance, purchase price, and depreciation – all of which can vary considerably between petrol and diesel versions of the same car.
    Diesel-powered cars tend to be more expensive to buy and service than their petrol counterparts, although the 'diesel premium' reduces in relative terms as cars get bigger.
    The most influential (and most overlooked) factor in running costs is time. Depreciation is the biggest cost in car ownership, so resale values play a huge part in deciding whether a petrol or diesel car will be more cost-effective overall.
    On the upside, diesels are generally cheaper to insure. It's also true that the more miles you cover; the more likely you are to save money by choosing diesel.
    As an example, the Fiat 500 diesel does nearly 14mpg more than its 1.2 petrol sister, but its purchase price is 2400 higher. On economy alone, owners would need to cover more than 130,000 miles in the diesel before the fuel economy/purchase price equation levels out. Once servicing costs are factored in, the petrol car builds its advantage, ending up more than 900 cheaper to run over three years or 36,000 miles.
    Driving preferences

    If a buyer has a negative opinion of diesels based on a car they drove 10 or even five years ago, it's time to think again. Engineering advances have now blurred the line between petrol and diesel, both for performance and refinement.
    A diesel develops maximum torque – the 'shove' you need to pick up speed – at lower engine revs, allowing you to change up through the gears earlier. This relatively narrow power band can make manual gearchanges a chore, but modern automatics work very well with diesel engines.
    Today's diesels can be smoother than petrol engines too – especially the two or three-cylinder petrol units that are a popular choice for manufacturers looking to boost fuel efficiency.
    Good diesels are currently around 35% efficient, petrols around 27%, but companies such as Mazda are closing the gap by producing petrol engines with diesel-like torque, and diesel engines with petrol-like response. New-generation petrol engines are becoming smaller, lighter and more efficient, with no loss of performance.
    One important factor to bear in mind when choosing diesel is the increasing use of diesel particulate filters (DPFs). In mixed driving, these filters work fine, but if your driving is mainly town-based, you should think carefully before buying a DPF-equipped car. A diet of low-speed urban motoring will clog a DPF filter, and the manufacturer's suggested regimen for unclogging them may not always work.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Okay, I've finished now, I'll get my coat

    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    The last few times I've changed cars, I've modelled the fuel costs in excell - my wife's a company FD and likes proper numbers.
    The long and short of it was that, for the sort of driving I did, the difference between a good diesel and a less good ( I'm using "good" in mpg terms here) was nominal. Five or ten pounds a month.

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    I've got a Skoda Octavia Scout 1.8 petrol. It's been great for carrying my canoe. I feel more comfortable with an estate type car than an SUV because it's lower and I imagine is a bit less susceptible to strong crosswinds. Curiously there's no discernible difference in mpg with or without a canoe on the roof. The 4x4 and extra ground clearance is very handy for getting to the kinds of places we want to be, especially in winter. Having said all that, I'm getting a Subaru Outback 2.0d next week. Diesel because I'm not commuting anymore, Subaru because the dealer is just down the road.

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    Hi, I have a Skoda Yeti 4x4 170, and I can't rate it highly enough. I tow a 1300kg caravan and it did a brill job taking it up to Scotland and back the other week. It's a 2.0 tdi so plenty of power there, and surprisingly quick too. It's 4.5 years old and hasn't had the VW fix done, nor will I ever let them do it. The amount of issues that have come from having the fix done on various forums and they still deny it causes any of them, definitely avoid getting it done if you can help it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al. View Post
    I thought it was about a farl. Toasted with butter and a couple of rashers of bacon. Fried egg is optional.
    Ah, the Ulster Fry?

    But that would be a wee one.

    I love Irish soda bread.

    Now I wish to God I'd joined those men when they were set ashore, but I chose a wild and a reckless life serving under Captain Moore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    I love Irish soda bread.
    My mum makes cracking soda bread!

    Thanks all for the replies.

    The vast majority of my mileage is on the motorway. I currently drive an Audi A4 which I like a lot but the low seating position is murder on my back.....hence the 4x4......which is also handy for paddling and camping. I want something fairly economical but also something available immediately...so the yeti meets most of these demands......the only half decent one available is the 150
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

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    Diesel v petrol, the age old question. I was seduced by Hyundai and bought a new I30 1.6 cdi in 2012 and I love it. Chirk to Carlisle, 168'ish miles and average fuel consumption of 77.2 mpg. Back and to for work each day I get 58 - 65 mpg depending on my mood (driving style!). Road tax is 0, insurance is low, tyres are sensible s and servicing is not expensive. The car's performance is enough for me, it accelerates at a fair lick, is silent at motorway speeds and will do 115mph if asked to do so in completely illegal fashion. Expense in 5yrs is servicing and 4 tyres. Reliable as hell and I'm happy with my motor. I only do about 12000 miles per year as well so no idea where this threshold mileage comes from!

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    is the yeti being replaced by a suv type? is it only me? but does the Skoda badge resemble a winged male body part, rather than a winged arrow?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterB View Post
    is the yeti being replaced by a suv type? is it only me? but does the Skoda badge resemble a winged male body part, rather than a winged arrow?
    its you Peter
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterB View Post
    is the yeti being replaced by a suv type? is it only me? but does the Skoda badge resemble a winged male body part, rather than a winged arrow?
    Until now, it was only you. Now I have to contend with that thought every time I sit behind the steering wheel...

    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterB View Post
    is the yeti being replaced by a suv type? is it only me? but does the Skoda badge resemble a winged male body part, rather than a winged arrow?
    I'd see a doctor if I was you

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    the Doc said there is nowt she can do for me, beyond help, and to ignore the voices in my head, as they will only get me into more trouble.

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    I only do about 12000 miles per year as well so no idea where this threshold mileage comes from!
    I'll give you a rough idea based on a new Skoda Yeti.
    This is using the manufacturers new car prices and fuel consumption figures (rarely accurate) and todays fuel costs at my local Sainsburys. This is comparing two Yetis of the same spec and power output. It doesn't take into account road tax savings, just fuel costs and assumes the driver is doing 25000 miles pa.

    The diesel version costs 1265 more than the petrol, does 10 more mpg, but the fuel is slightly dearer.
    The fuel savings for diesel over 25000 miles are 490. If you divide that into the extra 1265 the diesel version cost, it would take just over 2.5 years to recoup that extra cost on fuel savings. For a 12000 mile per year driver, that figure would double. And that's just to break even, it will take even longer to start making savings.

    This is just a rough example, prices vary and so do circumstances for each individual. I don't advocate that people drive either one, that is their choice, the same as choosing a new canoe - we all have varying criteria.
    Whilst you're happy with your choice, there have been many thousands of people who've been seduced by superior diesel fuel consumption figures and didn't take into account the extra cost of buying that version, and of course, sometime ago when diesel was substantially cheaper than petrol, diesel made much more sense.
    There is no right or wrong here, but I would certainly advocate that anyone deliberating on which version to buy, should certainly do the maths on prospective costs during their intended ownership. And certainly don't use manufacturers exaggerated consumption figures for either type.


    Further to the NOx emissions fix, I read this today, which might be of interest.

    http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/askhj/an...0on%20my%20car
    Last edited by OLD MAN; 6th-May-2017 at 10:44 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bananaboat View Post
    I'm getting a Subaru Outback 2.0d next week. Diesel because I'm not commuting anymore, Subaru because the dealer is just down the road.
    You won't be disappointed. I swapped my 2005 Forester XT for one last year and it's the perfect vehicle for carrying a canoe and all your gear. Massive boot and plenty of room for four adults if required. My only criticism is thst it's underpowered compared to my old Forester but I'm comparing diesel to a petrol turbo. Fuel economy is a marked improvement though.
    Bootstrap
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bob View Post
    You won't be disappointed. I swapped my 2005 Forester XT for one last year and it's the perfect vehicle for carrying a canoe and all your gear. Massive boot and plenty of room for four adults if required. My only criticism is thst it's underpowered compared to my old Forester but I'm comparing diesel to a petrol turbo. Fuel economy is a marked improvement though.
    That's good to know, my Octavia Scout was very thirsty for petrol and oil lately.

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    Thanks for all the advice........Particularly from Old Man who's like a breathing Parker guide
    Went for a 3 year old Kuga in the end...........
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

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