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Thread: New River Wye Canoe Maps

  1. #1

    Default New River Wye Canoe Maps

    Rivers Publishing are delighted to announce two new maps for the River Wye - Designed by canoeists for canoeists, these are very much “hands on” map - waterproof and easy to use whilst paddling down the river - they even float. They show all the essential paddling information as clearly as possible at a large scale - 1:36,000.

    Sheet size 572 x 350mm.
    · Folded size 95 X 175mm.
    · Printed in full colour and double sided.
    · Polyart waterproof paper.
    · ISBN: 978-0-9957513-0-9
    · Publication: April 2017
    · Recommended Retail Price: £8.95

    Two maps cover all 161 km of the most popular canoeing stretch of the river from Glasbury to Chepstow. This is a “Strip map” – with 4 convenient sections on each map showing the river and the countryside on each side of the river. The base map uses O.S. geodata which has been edited and enhanced to show essential information as clearly as possible. The map shows roads, towns, villages, footpaths, rivers, streams, lakes, churches, farms, houses, woods and hills. Physical relief is shown with a contour interval of 10m.

    Canoeing information is highlighted with colour boxes and symbols to show recommended launch sites, rapids, campsites, pubs, cafes and canoe hire bases.

    There are brief guidance notes on paddling the river Wye and essential information for key rapids like Symonds Yat. There are also up to date notes on other information sources – websites, books, etc.
    It should be invaluable for anyone planning a single or multi-day trip.


    The maps are in the shops next week and are available online - we recommend www.wordery.com as an ethical, convenient and good value alternative to Amazon.

    Please see www.riverspublishing.co.uk for more details.

    If anyone is clever enough then perhaps you could post the front and back covers and snapshot up here please.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Kidderminster, North Worcestershire
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    Great

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,166

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    Good idea

    Covers:








    It would be good to get an example of what the mapping looks like too, Pete.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,166

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    I've been fortunate enough to be offered a couple of copies of these maps, which I've received. Whilst I wasn't specifically asked to do a review, hopefully my thoughts will be useful to anybody considering these maps.

    First Impressions

    Small and neat, easy to keep in a pocket or buoyancy aid, and they're made from a waterproof paper so should last well. The visual design is appealling, but more importantly once you open them up, they're clear and easy to use.

    Navigation
    The mapping is a little like the Open Source mapping and a little like Harveys. The scale of 1:36k, around 2 miles per inch, may take regular OS users a little while to get their heads around, but makes sense to offer enough detail for clear navigation and to ensure you don't have to keep changing sides or moving from map to map all the time. A canoe-shaped "scale" allows you to judge distances, though if I'm honest I'll miss the fact there are no km grid squares which help me keep track of how far things are. A minor point though.
    The surroundings use 10m contours, which are perfect for a map used when you're at the bottom of the terrain all the time, showing you where the major hills are to help orientate yourself, but not filling the map with too much detail for clarity.
    Each side of each map has two sections of the river portrayed roughly in a vertical orientation, maximising the use of the space. Regular "North" indicators make sure you know which way up you are!







    Information
    All the major points of interest are clearly marked with an info box, and include a "distance from Glasbury" value. These include launch spots, campsites, bridges, points of interest, pubs, cafes and the few relatively major water features. Launch spots include a "star rating", relating to ease of access and convenience, and they're well judged. Campsites include a £, ££ or £££ rating presumably relating to approx costs. Where needed, phone numbers are listed. There are also a few photos.

    There are also some information boxes at the top and bottom of each side, with general useful information on paddling, camping, canoe hire, distances and useful other sources of information (Song of the Paddle gets a mention). On the second sheet, there are some specific planning notes for the tidal section below Brockweir.



    Overall
    These two maps have pretty much all the basic information you require to paddle the Wye. There are guidebooks, such as Mark Rainsley's "Rive Wye Canoe and Kayak Guide Book" which offer a fuller picture and more information, plus geographical and historical interest, but these maps have everything you need from a simple navigation point of view. They certainly seem to offer more than the EA "Wye Canoe" guide which can be downloaded as I think its out of print. They're also waterproof and seem tear resistant, so should last for many voyages on this lovely river. If I'm being picky, I'd like grid lines to help judge distances, and they appear to be a little pricey, but this is presumably all about the quality paper you get. I shall be testing them out on the Wye, hopefully in the next month or two, and will update this then, but for now, very much recommended.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Claxton
    Posts
    558

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    I bought these maps as I am doing the Wye with the family this summer. I was pretty surprised when I opened them up as they are quite small, and I was expecting something more like a laminated os map. However, the waterproof paper looks good quality and tear resistant. I think I will still need os maps as i was hoping to do some local walking and the strip maps are very localised to the river.

    I also noticed a typo in the box on the Hay on Wye launch site which was surprising to see.

    I think this map would be very useful for people planning day or multiday trips on the Wye.

    In hindsight I probably didn't need them as all my campsites are booked, but they do have useful details on things like emergency egress points and are very portable so will definitely be taken with us.

    Robin
    The early bird may catch the worm... but the second mouse gets the cheese!

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for the feed back.

    Hi, Pete Knowles here, from Rivers Publishing,

    "I was expecting something more like a laminated os map. However, the waterproof paper looks good quality and tear resistant."

    Let me explain that the polyart plastic paper used is the same quality material as used for the Harvey Maps and as those familiar with the Harvey maps will know, the material is really easy to fold any way you want so the map fits in even in a small pocket.

    I think the only downside to the polyart paper is the considerable extra cost - but for a hands on map like this, we felt it was a must.

    Happy paddling!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    S. Yorkshire
    Posts
    607

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    I received my copies a week or so ago - bought for planning a trip next month. They look good, are easy to read and the paper feels strong and well-finished.
    I think of maps as consumable items and expect to replace even the weatherproof OS maps after 5 years or so, if only to keep the information up to date. Even though these are paper, I think they will last reasonably well.
    The size seems about right for something you may use afloat - it will fit easily in a PFD pocket, and wont be too hard to handle unfolded in the boat.
    I particularly liked the mileage chart - that makes planning a multiday journey much easier.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Aberdeenshire
    Posts
    111

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    I remember a few years ago seeing an OS mountainmaster map for Ben Nevis (waterproof etc) It was in a stream, wedged between rocks and ice. The detail had mostly faded with water, weather and U/V, but the paper was intact. Potentially a Royalex replacement!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    20,166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    I've been fortunate enough to be offered a couple of copies of these maps, which I've received. Whilst I wasn't specifically asked to do a review, hopefully my thoughts will be useful to anybody considering these maps.

    First Impressions

    Small and neat, easy to keep in a pocket or buoyancy aid, and they're made from a waterproof paper so should last well. The visual design is appealling, but more importantly once you open them up, they're clear and easy to use.

    Navigation
    The mapping is a little like the Open Source mapping and a little like Harveys. The scale of 1:36k, around 2 miles per inch, may take regular OS users a little while to get their heads around, but makes sense to offer enough detail for clear navigation and to ensure you don't have to keep changing sides or moving from map to map all the time. A canoe-shaped "scale" allows you to judge distances, though if I'm honest I'll miss the fact there are no km grid squares which help me keep track of how far things are. A minor point though.
    The surroundings use 10m contours, which are perfect for a map used when you're at the bottom of the terrain all the time, showing you where the major hills are to help orientate yourself, but not filling the map with too much detail for clarity.
    Each side of each map has two sections of the river portrayed roughly in a vertical orientation, maximising the use of the space. Regular "North" indicators make sure you know which way up you are!






    Information
    All the major points of interest are clearly marked with an info box, and include a "distance from Glasbury" value. These include launch spots, campsites, bridges, points of interest, pubs, cafes and the few relatively major water features. Launch spots include a "star rating", relating to ease of access and convenience, and they're well judged. Campsites include a £, ££ or £££ rating presumably relating to approx costs. Where needed, phone numbers are listed. There are also a few photos.

    There are also some information boxes at the top and bottom of each side, with general useful information on paddling, camping, canoe hire, distances and useful other sources of information (Song of the Paddle gets a mention). On the second sheet, there are some specific planning notes for the tidal section below Brockweir.



    Overall
    These two maps have pretty much all the basic information you require to paddle the Wye. There are guidebooks, such as Mark Rainsley's "Rive Wye Canoe and Kayak Guide Book" which offer a fuller picture and more information, plus geographical and historical interest, but these maps have everything you need from a simple navigation point of view. They certainly seem to offer more than the EA "Wye Canoe" guide which can be downloaded as I think its out of print. They're also waterproof and seem tear resistant, so should last for many voyages on this lovely river. If I'm being picky, I'd like grid lines to help judge distances, and they appear to be a little pricey, but this is presumably all about the quality paper you get. I shall be testing them out on the Wye, hopefully in the next month or two, and will update this then, but for now, very much recommended.

    OK, time for an update after using them on the Wye the weekend before last. In summary, these are excellent, and all the above still stands. They are very easy to use on the river, and the small size makes them very convenient. The way the sections has been split also works very logically, the obvious "runs" from the popular put-ins to get-outs, being on one visual section of the map so no need to switch sides often.

    I mentioned the lack of grid lines to help judge distance as a potential issue, but in use its a very minor one and you get used to the scale quickly enough.



    Quote Originally Posted by Slime View Post
    Thanks for the feed back.

    Hi, Pete Knowles here, from Rivers Publishing,

    "I was expecting something more like a laminated os map. However, the waterproof paper looks good quality and tear resistant."

    Let me explain that the polyart plastic paper used is the same quality material as used for the Harvey Maps and as those familiar with the Harvey maps will know, the material is really easy to fold any way you want so the map fits in even in a small pocket.

    I think the only downside to the polyart paper is the considerable extra cost - but for a hands on map like this, we felt it was a must.

    Happy paddling!

    Here I will admit i was wondering if the paper was up to the job. It is. As is typical for me, I simply chucked the map down in the boat when paddling, or slid it, folded to the right page, between bag and thwarts in front of me so I could see it, hence it got plenty of abuse and was splashed regularly. It handled this well, and apart from the odd crease and a drop of red wine on it , you wouldn't know it had been used.


    Very happy with them.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Claxton
    Posts
    558

    Default

    Just back from paddling Glasbury to Monmouth and I can report that the maps worked a treat. Very hard wearing, good information and easy to tuck into a pocket on your buoyancy aid.

    Robin
    The early bird may catch the worm... but the second mouse gets the cheese!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW France
    Posts
    2,472

    Default

    Having done done the trip with Mal as a pre Scandanavia Kit shake out, I can attest to the quality of the maps and their durability as well.

    I've no clue about what is where on the Wye,not being from round there, so I spent a fair bit of time checking out where we were and where we were about to be. I found them to be really helpful and informative. Tampa size works well in the boat and the sections are perfect for a single view of the trip. The distances are easily derived from the marked sections of distance overall and they are really clear when glancing from the boat

    overall, I was impressed with them. Good stuff Pete


    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    OK, time for an update after using them on the Wye the weekend before last. In summary, these are excellent, and all the above still stands. They are very easy to use on the river, and the small size makes them very convenient. The way the sections has been split also works very logically, the obvious "runs" from the popular put-ins to get-outs, being on one visual section of the map so no need to switch sides often.

    I mentioned the lack of grid lines to help judge distance as a potential issue, but in use its a very minor one and you get used to the scale quickly enough.






    Here I will admit i was wondering if the paper was up to the job. It is. As is typical for me, I simply chucked the map down in the boat when paddling, or slid it, folded to the right page, between bag and thwarts in front of me so I could see it, hence it got plenty of abuse and was splashed regularly. It handled this well, and apart from the odd crease and a drop of red wine on it , you wouldn't know it had been used.


    Very happy with them.
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Canoe outfitting packages in the Massif Central


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