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Thread: The MyCanoe 2.5, a 14’ folding canoe that comes in a box - review

  1. #1
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    Default The MyCanoe 2.5, a 14’ folding canoe that comes in a box - review

    Some weeks ago, the chance came up via the SOTP Facebook site to test out a different type of folding canoe, the MyCanoe. As I’ve this year become a member of the folding canoe owners club, I jumped at the chance to try a variation on a theme, as it is quite different to my Ally DR15 Folder with its rods and struts skin-over-frame construction.

    The MyCanoe is described as an origami canoe. And it does indeed resemble a paper model, thanks to its single folding skin nature. It’s a 14’ tandem canoe, though I would mostly be trying it solo – which to be fair to the canoe is probably something that hasn’t really been thought about.

    First, a little background. The canoe has been made in Korea for a number of years, but this 2.5 version is a new model. They’ve previously sold in the European market, but this is the first time they will be available in the UK, thanks to Simon Bolze of Folding Kayaks UK who is intending to import them. As it happens, this was the very first to arrive, and as Simon is more of a kayaker, I would be the first to try one.

    They are made from a custom polypropylene fabric, which does look a little like plasticised cardboard, but is far better than that! This is UV treated to last 15 years, and is tested to fold 20000 times. There are 4 metal cross pieces, and a stiffened gunwhale to hold the shape.

    Uniquely amongst canoes, as far as I know, the MyCanoe has adjustable rocker – “gussets” in the side can be adjusted with straps. Open them out, and the ends will drop leaving almost no rocker but good straight line tracking. Close them by tightening the straps, and the ends will lift slightly, offering a moderate rocker to easy manoeuvrability.

    The shape is very much that of a true open canoe.

    The full specification, details and a video are available here:
    http://foldingkayaks.co.uk/detail_mycanoe.html


    http://foldingkayaks.co.uk/images/my...ation_780w.gif


    OK. So, I posted a thread on SOTP to see if we could get a small group together and combine a test with a paddle of St Patrick’s Stream, one of the loveliest backwaters of the Thames. Unfortunately, the weather gods weren’t on our side, and with a rainy forecast, a few folk dropped out. So it was just my mate Pete, in a kayak, and myself who met Simon at Mill Lane, Shiplake, on a wet Saturday.


    When Simon opened the back of his van, which was full of a variety of interesting folding craft of all shapes and sizes, he pulled out a couple of modest sized “boxes”. The canoe comes in two bags; a smallish padded one which holds the cross-pieces, gunwhales, seats and pleasingly a rubber mallet; and a larger “box” which holds the skin of the canoe. The outer part of the box actually forms a reinforcing floor within the canoe.







    Padded bag



    Main box



    The big box is about 94 x 63 x 20cm, the padded bag 88 x 40 x 18cm. Combined, they weigh about 25kg.

    The box is held together by quick release buckles, and when undone, the 2 parts come away and become part of the internal floor.









    Before we start the build proper, a little more about the fabric. This polypropylene board should sound like the weak link, as it resembles the sort of thing used for display boards etc, but it actually feels tough and strong, and as mentioned above, is fold-tested thousands of times more than you’ll ever need. There’s a simple repair kit should you manage to puncture it, but that seems unlikely unless you really mistreat it, and its basically just tape to cover a hole.






    The Build
    And so to the build. Having opened up the box and put aside the 2 floor pieces, we started to open out the main skin of the canoe. I should point out that there were 3 of us, though Pete and I did most of the work under occasional direction from Simon. However, we took it really slowly, so I could record the built.


    First, a buckled strap “releases” the skin. This then becomes the closest thing it has to a central thwart once finished.









    The skin is then pulled out into the approximate canoe shape.






    The first part to assemble is the stems, where a folding brace-piece slots simply in around waterline level, and then the end “deck” folds into place and is pulled taught by simple elastic bungees.












    Now for the bit that felt more familiar to me as the owner of an Ally folder – the cross-struts. On the Ally, there are 7 of these. The MyCanoe only needs 4. They’re also easier to insert into place, having a simple bracket to click into on the inside of the canoe below the gunwhales. You then simply push them downwards and into place, using the mallet as required.















    You start with the “outside” cross-struts, which are smaller, and stored in a labelled slot within the bag.

    With the first two in place, we could then chose our “rocker”. Tightening the strap on the gunwhale closes the gap and lifts the ends of the canoe to form the rocker. 5-6cm is claimed to be possible, I’d say that, with brand new stiff fabric, we struggled to get quite as much as that as the “gusset” was hard to close completely.









    In go the two floor pieces (that formed the box) with the patterned side upwards to allow the use of the attached Velcro straps to line up and secure the two larger central struts which go in next.






    Now we reached back into the padded bag for the blue drawstring bag containing the gunwhales. Linked with a tough flexible cable, these resemble those sliding black plastic “clamps” that you run down the spine of a sheaf of paper when producing a presentation or something.





    Two short pieces slot over the end plates to complete those.






    Now we started to put the first gunwhale on. Working from one end, we slid the plastic gunwhale over the reinforced edge of the canoe’s skin. At each joint, a small metal piece slots from one section to the next. A little care is needed to make sure these slide into place without bending them.












    Velcro straps further hold the gunwhales down. The second soon followed the first.






    At the ends, you pull the cable tight, tighten a sliding stopper, and tuck it all under the end plates, which are then covered by a further rubber cap.















    We were pretty much there now, and the MyCanoe was really looking the part. We now needed to add the seats. These are a solid flat seat, sitting on a folding parts which clip onto the cross-struts at one side, and then with a bungy from the other side. You can flip these around to be either side of each strut, or move them between struts. This gives excellent flexibility of seating and trim for a tandem pair. It also allows you to position one seat quite close to the centre for a solo paddler – more of this in a bit.


















    OK, we were done. What we now had in front of us, was a proper, rigid open canoe. And it didn’t weigh much. The build had been pretty straightforward, and would quickly become easy, and I have no reason to believe you couldn’t quickly get it down to the quoted 10 minutes as a pair, 15 minutes solo perhaps. It had taken us half an hour, with lots of stops for photos and to listen to Simon’s descriptions of why things were designed as they were.






    OK, there’s probably more flex than the Ally folder, which has as said 7 cross-struts, plus 9 chine rods/gunwhales, but that takes up to 4 times as long to build, long enough to be off putting for day-only trips. The MyCanoe is quick to put up, a definite positive there. The hull has a definite proper canoe shapes, and comes complete with reinforcing skid plates at each end. These will help when landing or putting in, but I still wouldn't want to drag the canoe over any rough surfaces.












    On the water
    OK, now time for the acid test – how does it feel afloat. I’d set up the seat just behind the middle.





    There’s an optional webbing strap which can go across right where a yoke would be on a normal canoe, but this didn’t really add any rigidity so I unclipped it so I could sit more centrally.






    You’ll notice I say “sit”, and many will know I’m a kneeler when it comes to paddling. The seat is effectively solid, so you can’t kneel with your feet beneath it, so I set up with one leg outstretched and one tucked across. Later I would try my bag as a kneeling saddle.







    Now afloat, it was time to give her a bit of a test. Primary stability was reasonable, a little twitchier than my Prospector or Ally, but typical of a decent stillwater canoe. Secondary stability is excellent, once leant over it finds a nice balanced position, and pushes back if you try to lean further. I got myself comfortable, and started paddling. Immediately it was clear that this was a genuine canoe, and handled like one. It tracked well (remember you can reduce the rocker too), and in a straight line got up a decent speed. It seemed to glide better than the Ally folder, though I would not claim it to be as fast as a stillwater solid open canoe. Pete also had a go, so you can see it in action better.






    I heeled it over as best as I could seated, and tried to spin it. Not bad at all, again it handled like a “real” canoe, not as easy to spin as my Ally or most Prospectors, but comparable I’d say to the likes of Mad River Reflections, Pals, Mega Outlanders, Apaches etc etc.












    So, initial solo impressions were good, just needed to think about the seating.

    Next, Pete and I jumped in for a go tandem. And for this the seating was good, and the canoe handled well. We got up to quite a pace, definitely faster than the Ally.






    Meanwhile, Simon had been building his own kayak, an impressive beast in itself. It was time for our paddle to start. I’m not going to blog this properly, it was pretty wet and miserable, so we just got on with the paddle up the Thames. I was back to solo paddling now.









    It was slightly weird being able to see the water line through the fabric!






    Paddling upstream the MyCanoe continued to perform well, it wasn’t feeling like a folding canoe any more. When we turned down St Patrick’s stream, I tried using my dry bag as a kneeling saddle, with the back perched on the edge of the seat. This was a vast improvement on the half-sitting/half kneeling position I’d been using, and it really made the canoe come alive. Partly this was just because I always kneel, but it proved to me the canoe is genuinely capable of being manoeuvred easily.












    Meandering down the Stream, I was enjoying being out on the water, and the MyCanoe was working just fine.












    St Patrick’s Stream was as lovely as always, and then we drifted down the Loddon to the Thames. WE then headed downstream for 10 minutes, before pulling over to grab a bite to eat.









    We decided not to go any further, and do the Hennerton Backwater, so headed back to the start via the short portage of Shiplake Lock. Here we met Richard, a paddler from the Marlow Canoe Club, who would collect the canoe for its next test the following day.












    OK, so the paddling was over. My conclusion is that it paddles well, like a solid open canoe, if just a little slower. Its faster than any inflatable I have paddled, and can be heeled over to improve turning. On still water, it beats my Ally folder for performance, though the latter is designed to also go down rivers with a load.

    I can’t comment as to how it would perform in waves, but my instinct is that it would be fine, if more flexible than the Ally.

    Its not designed as a white water river runner. It would be fine on grade 1, and confident paddlers would no doubt get it down much harder, but its not expected to be bouncing off rocks and shallow sections.

    Capacity wise, it can take something like 240kg, though the suggested load max is 200. This would mean 2 adults and a kid, or 2 and bags. So for canoe camping trips, you’d be a little limited for gear if both paddlers were fairly heavy.

    As mentioned, and in common with many tandem canoes, it doesn’t come set up for solo paddling so you’d need to think about it. The seating is good for most tandem paddlers, and therefore I would imagine a large number of prospective buyers wouldn’t have any problems with them. 


    Stabilisers
    There are some inflatable stabilisers available as an optional extra, which just clip on. These are designed in particular for folk like fishermen who need to stand, but would also increase the weight capacity. We tried them out quickly, and standing up was certainly fine with these. They get in the way for solo paddling with a single blade, of course, but paddling from stern and bow wouldn’t be badly affected.






    Packing away

    This was basically just a reversal of building it, but faster.












    The fun bit is, of course, getting the knack of getting the fold right. Entertaining for the photographer. You’d soon get the hang of it.









    Soon we were done, and Richard marched off with the canoe. Its very portable.








    Availability and pricing.

    Simon of Folding Kayaks UK is looking to import in batches, as its such a new product to the UK, so its not yet available “off the shelf”. Nor are the other obvious folders, I had to import mine myself.

    The guide price is £1300. Simon is looking into possible opening offers for SOTP members, and will no doubt post about these soon.


    Conclusions

    This is an impressive piece of engineering. Its quick to build and pack away, and on the water performs really quite well on still and slow moving water. Tandem its ready to go if you don’t generally kneel, solo you’ll need to adapt something to make yourself comfortable if kneeling.
    I could imagine this being an excellent choice for somebody considering an inflatable, but wanting a canoe that performs like a solid open canoe. As its so quick to build, day tripping would be easy, whereas with my Ally, it takes out quite a chunk of the day. It would also be excellent for folk using a campervan and wanting to take a canoe.

    It performs well in many paddling conditions, though I haven’t tested it in strong wind (the light weight would probably mean it being a bit wind-affected, but not badly), waves or moving water.

    Its hard to comment on ultimate durability, but its well made, the parts are tough and close fitting, its easily patchable if you manage to puncture it, and the “fabric” is pretty tough. Its not a cheap canoe, and nor does it feel like one, it’s a proper bit of kit and I would expect to get years of stillwater paddling out of it with a little care. For more serious expeditions flying to remoter parts of the world, I am happy that my Ally is the better choice for me; though it doesn’t paddle as well as the MyCanoe, its larger load capacity and rigidity for portaging are something I prefer. I am, though, probably not typical of the sort of customer who would consider this canoe.

    If I were wanting it mostly because I didn’t have space at home, had difficulty car-topping the canoe, wanted to travel on public transport in the UK etc, etc, this is a real alternative to inflatables and to other folding canoes. In particular, the way it paddles is in a different league to most of these.

    It’s a very clever canoe.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  2. #2
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    A very clever innovation, not sure it will see the end of traditional canoes, but sure has a place in todays market for the potential overseas trip to the more remote parts of the world that are becoming more accessible to the modern explorer.
    One can be confident it will appeal to city folk where space is at a premium and canoe storage is limited.
    Well demonstrated and documented Mal.

    Doubt it will work for me as I have trouble folding a T-shirt
    Last edited by tonym; 22nd-September-2016 at 11:10 PM.
    "I am easily satisfied with the very best" Sir Winston Churchill, He once owned an Apache too!

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Poole
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    Default The MyCanoe, a 14’ folding canoe that comes in a box - review II

    My Canoe on the Basingstoke Canal


    After an aborted first attempt, I rebooked with Simon Bolze of Folding Concepts, to try out his ‘MyCanoe’ on the Basingstoke Canal on Tuesday 20th September and Simon volunteered to meet me at Winchfield and join me on the paddle to Odiham Castle.

    The forecast was looking good as I set off from Poole, hardly a breath of wind and an ever brightening day – ideal conditions for a lightweight folding canoe!

    I decided to take Simon up on the ‘try out’ of his boat, not so much as an immediate need for myself, but out of genuine curiosity – how do you make the world’s first Origami canoe, make it credible and make it robust enough to carry 240kg, yet weigh just 24kg packed and make it in such a way that it can be assembled or packed away in under 10 minutes (with practice)? I just had to find out!

    Our first obstacle, and one for the locals to note, is that the canal side car park at The Hurst is CLOSED indefinitely, due to antisocial behaviour??? There is limited parking available on the lane leading up to the Barley Mow bridge, otherwise a longer walk is going to be needed – we were fortunate and managed to bag two spaces right on the bridge as dog walkers returned to their cars.

    Setting up…

    After introductions had been made, we carted our kit to the canal side, Simon would be paddling one of his Neris folding kayaks and the package for this made the MyCanoe packs look tiny by comparison. Packed up the MyCanoe comes in a box (the hull) measuring 94x63x20cm and a bag (gunnels, ribs and seats) measuring 88x18x40cm, taking up no more space than a large suitcase in your boot.





    The ‘box’ that the hull is packed into, rather craftily is not just packaging and whilst put to one side at the beginning of the assembly, the two halves of the case turn into well padded kneeling mats/floor boards for the central section of the canoe, providing a very substantial surface to kneel or stand on.

    The first thing that struck me was the rigidity of the “ultra tough polypropylene corrugated plastic cardboard” – I initially had visions of an estate agents For Sale board, but the truth of the matter is that the canoe material is considerably thicker and very cleverly seamed to provide the fold lines. The bow and stern are further protected by a rubber cap and there is a thick piece of clear polyurethane at the bottom edge of this to protect the leading edge of the keel – it looked very well thought out.

    With Simon directing me, I extended out the bow, then repeated the same for the stern, suddenly I had a canoe in front of me – a couple of small braces that are built into either end hold the shape initially, then the folding decks get locked together, before the four ribs are added.

    The ribs are made from tubular aluminium, painted black and have end caps preventing water ingress. I would imagine that if the ribs were made from carbon fibre, a little more weight could be shaved off, plus remove any risk of corrosion from salt water.

    However, before we added the ribs, it’s time to decide how much rocker you’d like, yes, this boat has adjustable rocker. This gives you the ability to dial in up to 6cm of rocker at either or both ends of the boat, by way of four darts along each sidewall. These darts are tightened or allowed to lay loose by means of simple cinch straps on the outside of the hull – so, so simple, but very effective!





    I started off with the straps half tightened and completed the journey to Odiham Castle set like this, for the return journey, we whipped off the gunnels and dialled the rocker out, giving a minimal rocker.

    The ribs clip into metal brackets on the sides of the canoe and then fold down, jamming themselves tightly against the floor (rubber mallet supplied!), the middle two ribs additionally rest upon the now installed kneeling boards making the hull very rigid indeed!

    The seats, whilst not ideal (I’ll come back to that), then clip onto the front or rear of any of the ribs, giving you 8 different seating positions, depending on load and need – I initially set mine too far back, but two minutes ashore and I’d moved it amidships – again, really simple and effective.

    The gunnel for each side is in multiple pieces, but strung together on a tensionable wire, just feed them over the top of the sidewalls (and darts), tension the wire, close the Velcro straps and you’re done – your boat is ready for floating!







    Now I suppose I should explain that I have only been paddling open boats for 18 months, so my ‘technical’ knowledge may not be as strong as some, but during that 18 months I have covered 230 miles in my canoe and a further 270 miles in my kayak – most of my open boating has been on canals, or low grade river, such as The Avon at Bath, but I do venture out into Poole Harbour too, and enjoy a few whitecaps!

    My experience of boats is somewhat limited too; apart from the boats I have borrowed to do my BCU 2* and FSRT courses, my only real experience is my own Apache Tribe – a superb flat water tourer that will turn, if heeled over, but otherwise behaves more like an oil tanker – fast, superb tracking and glide, stable and turns eventually.

    With this in mind, I stepped into the MyCanoe with trepidation – firstly, how was the canoe going to handle my weight (I’m probably not far off two of many of you), and secondly what was the stability going to be like when compared to my Tribe… I really needn’t have worried though, a few ripples were created, but on the whole I found the boat to be easy to get into and very stable, just a very small amount of twitching was experienced and I didn’t put my foot straight through the hull!

    I settled on to the seat and encountered an issue – there was no way to kneel, as many UK paddlers do – sitting was perfectly comfortable, but lost me my connection with the hull. After moving the seat amidships, I found that if I perched on the front edge of the seat, I could fold one leg under the other to brace one knee against the hull, with the other leg extended, resting on the back of the front seat – this provided good connection to the boat and was easy enough to switch from left to right (as pins and needles set in). This was the posture I adopted for most of the paddle. I did try to fold my feet under the seat, but there is simply insufficient space through the ribs. Simon is aware of this and is considering alternatives and possible solutions. Simon mentioned that he was also considering a ‘booster cushion’ for the seats, as some had commented that they were sat too low down in the boat, but for me with short legs and a long body, this presented no issue.

    And so to the paddle…





    The boat with the rocker set to ‘medium’ feels incredibly light, the acceleration from a standing start is easy; paddle strokes elicit fast turning potential when required. Playing with a sculling draw, bow rudder, or C stroke can make this baby move wherever you want it to, with minimal effort, it really is highly manoeuvrable, yet still glides along at a reasonable pace. Our average speed over the 9 miles was 2.3mph, which is only marginally slower than I would have done on a relaxed paddle in my Tribe. Primary stability was good once I became accustomed to it’s slight twitchiness and secondary stability was superb, you could really lean it over when needed and still feel secure.

    The only limitation I found with the rocker set to medium, was that due to my style of paddling, I was unable to deliver full power without wasting a lot of time holding my J stroke in it’s corrective position – this was particularly evident when I switched to left-handed paddling (my weaker side), as hardly any corrective action was required. The maximum speed I achieved on the outward leg was 3.2mph.







    Once we arrived at Odiham we enjoyed our lunch and entertained the amused locals pouring over the craft – they seemed absolutely fascinated that I was going to clamber back into this folding piece of plastic and I think I disappointed them thoroughly by not falling in!

    Refuelled and with the rocker now dialled out, the boat felt completely different, the glide was longer and I was able to deliver more power without corrective actions. The boat still responded well to bow rudder strokes, but just felt a lot more settled. On the return leg I managed to record a top speed of 4.7mph, a noticeable improvement.



    When we arrived back at The Hurst, I simply reversed the assembly process, removed the gunnels, the seats, the ribs, the floor panels, slackened off the end caps and all of the cinch straps and then with a little guidance from Simon, we folded in the ends of the hull (seems wrong the first time you do it), and refastened the floor boards around the folded hull to make the case, it took minutes, shame you couldn’t say the same for Simon’s Neris!

    We didn’t have any wind to speak of and as such I didn’t have the chance to see how much the MyCanoe would ‘weathercock’, but looking at the above photos (which Simon took), there is plenty of freeboard and a fairly large area of bow and stern above the waterline – I feel a second test coming on, but this time in the harbour, where there is always a breeze!

    An interesting optional feature (which we did not try), is a pair of inflatable outriggers that clip onto the sides of the canoe – with these attached it is very easy to be able to stand up in the canoe and fish for example, though their presence would make solo paddling tricky…

    In summary…

    This is NOT a toy boat, this is a serious canoe, that performs as you would expect a canoe to, but it has the added advantages of being nice and light at 24kg, tunable (with the adjustable rocker), plus foldable in 10 minutes – there are not many folding canoes on the market that can boast both all these benefits.

    This is not a cheap canoe, but neither is it expensive when you compare it to other folding canoes on the market; the price of £1,300 lies well with similar boats.

    For anyone that is fed up with lifting their boat onto the car roof, or having to remove and refit their roof rack, or who hasn’t got a garage to store a rigid boat in, or wants to be able to paddle on the spur of the moment, be they at home, touring the country, or even away on a package holiday elsewhere in the world, a folding canoe like this, has to be a serious consideration – it is so simple to assemble, so light and so flexible, you can take it anywhere – it would certainly make long portages much easier!

    I could imagine me making a family trip to Buxton, Sheffield, Newport (Powys), Inverness or even Bergerac in France with one of these in the boot, just waiting for an opportunity to let the family enjoy a day without me… whilst I head off on another adventure, a new lake, river, overnight camp…

    If you get the chance, take the MyCanoe for a test drive, but please, leave your pre-conceptions on the bank!

    Here's a short video from the try out:



    Also see Mal's review of this boat, which contains many high quality photos and also provides a more technical review

    This review was provided freely and without reward, I have no links or ties to Folding Concepts.

  4. #4

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    Very neat piece of design and engineering, and I can see it can have a definite place in the market, especially in the UK with the emphasis on fairly small water lakes and river paddling (generally speaking) and on shorter trips fairly close to civilisation. As always, I find the price astounding, but that's SOP when I look at all canoe prices in the UK, so probably not out of line.

    The obvious drawbacks, from the perspective of a backcountry tripper, are its lack of any serious cargo capacity, and what I would guess would be a lack of durability for repeated take-outs for portages etc on rough uneven granite typical of Shield paddling. And one of the most serious issues, from my point of view, is the lack of a yoke, making repeated rough carries very difficult if not impossible.

    But, as I said, very cool engineering, even if not something I would be looking at myself.

    Question: What does it weigh, all assembled??

    Nice report, Mal.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
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    Packed is 24kg, so around 23kg for the assembled boat without the bag and mallet.

    With regards to carrying it, the central strap acts as a yoke, or you can use the metal ribs, or if its a long portage pack it away, it only takes a few minutes.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8r View Post

    Question: What does it weigh, all assembled??

    Nice report, Mal.
    Ta.

    Total weight being 25kg, I'd knock off 1-2kg for the bag/mallet etc.

    You're right about the lack of a yoke, and with no other thwarts at gunwhale level, its hard to lash something else up.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Scotland
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    Very comprehensive review Mal. When I saw the first couple of photos I was impressed or envious of the seat! ( For obvious reasons!......still walking line John Wayne with an overtightened truss) But having read on not kneeling and no thwart would be a problem for me. It's packed weight might also an issue for flying ( max weight for most airlines being 20. Kg ) although you could just pay for the extra kg"s.
    Would be interesting to see how it stood up to being hurled around portages or scaped over some of the rocky takeouts.
    I suspect as you've said it's not really going after that mkt.but must be a real contender for those who want a proper and light canoe but don't have the storage space....... or perhaps those with camper vans and the like.
    If I ever get the chance I certainly would like to give it a paddle .
    Bandy

    CLICK THE LINK TO THE SCOTTISH CANOE TRIPS CHANNEL FOR VIDEOS OF MY TRIPS : http://www.youtube.com/user/bandy598



  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by sk8r View Post

    The obvious drawbacks, from the perspective of a backcountry tripper, are its lack of any serious cargo capacity, and what I would guess would be a lack of durability for repeated take-outs for portages etc on rough uneven granite typical of Shield paddling. And one of the most serious issues, from my point of view, is the lack of a yoke, making repeated rough carries very difficult if not impossible.

    But, as I said, very cool engineering, even if not something I would be looking at myself.

    Question: What does it weigh, all assembled??


    Rechecked the canoe weight again today .... Box = 15.9kg (the skin and floor boards). Total weight of assembled canoe = 23.2kg. So 7.3kg represents the gunnels, seats, and alu ribs.

    The MyCanoe is not meant to be a heavy duty type of canoe. It is not meant to replace hardshell canoes. It is niche - it has characteristics and capabilities that hardshells does NOT have or CANNOT do. Like many hardshell canoes, there is no canoe that is perfect for everyone. However, we do see a new model variant coming out in the near future that will be a step up from this MyCanoe 2.5 .
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  9. #9

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    Many thanks to Mal Grey and AdrianO for the very their respective open minded and fair reviews.


    From the reviews done so far (some are not posted on SOTP) we are very happy to see that the MyCanoe 2.5 has basically passed the test, is not regarded as an expensive useless toy, it is a proper canoe that has the ability to be easily transportable and has no storage issues. What this also means, besides the obvious, is that this niche canoe should now cater for more folks to take up canoeing (which we all hope) who otherwise could not have done so or had to put up with some canoes that is not quite suitable or realistic enough for them.


    Which folks are we talking about? The folks with physical disabilities, temporary or permanent. Those in wheelchairs, have back problems and the like. All would like to be independent and not have to rely on others. Quite frankly, hardshells are useless or to too difficult to work with when it comes to transportation and storage. Inflatable canoes? Do any come close to being a proper canoe - there are none really. So that leaves folding canoes which are fairly realistic boats which do help but require time to assemble / disassemble, some maintenance and are not necessarily cheap. Then there is the MyCanoe - a niche canoe that is compact and quick to use.


    So besides being able to cater for the perfectly physically fit, the MyCanoe has real potential to cater for the disabled too. We are proud to have brought out a canoe that we hope will encourage more to take up canoeing.
    Last edited by FoldingConcepts; 23rd-September-2016 at 07:23 PM. Reason: clarity
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  10. #10
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    I've merged the two reviews and moved them to the reviews section.
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  11. #11
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    Makes sense, thanks John.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  12. #12

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    Thank you very much John.
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  13. #13
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    As a former user of folding kayaks, I'm always interested in new variations on the theme, although I don't perceive 24kg as "light." Okay, I'm a female senior citizen, but I suspect even a fit young man would find this an awkward load to manage on public transport. However, if 2 people were using it, they could divide the load which would help greatly. But for a more typical user, who can drive to the water, this looks a good way to avoid the problems of car-topping or of storage. Assembly times for skin-on-frame boats can be lengthy, so the "origami boats" may be the way of the future for those who can't - or don't want to - deal with a rigid canoe/ kayak.
    Not in Oxford any more...

  14. #14
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    thanks for the detailed reviews!
    the most interesting bit for me is the assembly time of 10-15mins. that makes quick day or even half-day paddles much easier than with a "normal" folding canoe like ally or pakboat. i love the idea of being able to adjust rocker. the weight is pretty much the same as my 16.5" pakboat which has more load capacity and is more durable, but hey - that one takes 3x as long to assemble. i can clearly see the advantage. although as mal also stated, for longer and more serious trips i'd stick with my pakboat or an ally (which do take a yoke, at least my pak does). the biggest disadvantage that i noticed, for me personally, is not being able to kneel on a stable platform as a solo paddler. ok you can use a bag... but that's hardly stable.

    all in all, it's great innovation!

  15. #15
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    Thanks very much for the detailed reviews. Fascinating.

    As per Lowlander's post, I would want to kneel on something stable. I use an Aiguille Stingray kneeling saddle in most boats but they're not small and taking one of them with this would somewhat defeat one of the main benefits of the canoe. I wonder whether it would be possible to design something that works like a kneeling saddle and folds. I can't see why not.

    I also wonder whether the Velcro straps on the gunwales would catch the paddle if levering the paddle off the gunwale.

    All-in-all, though, this looks like another interesting development in canoe design (perhaps along with drop-stitch inflatables, if canoes follow on from the kayaks now available). The set-up time is comparable to the time it takes to load and unload a rigid canoe on a car roof and strap it down. It also doesn't look like it would take much harm from being put away wet.

  16. #16

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    GMS

    Quote Originally Posted by GMS View Post
    I also wonder whether the Velcro straps on the gunwales would catch the paddle if levering the paddle off the gunwale.
    Rechecking the photos of the try-outs done so far, the position for levering the paddle off the gunwale appears to be halfway between the two gunwale velcro straps. Possibly Mal Grey and AdrianO could comment of this? If the velcro straps are actually in the way or close to it, then this is something that we can feed back to the factory.

    Actually another try-out will be soon - we can request that the users check for this aspect.
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  17. #17
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    I did catch the velcro straps, but only as I was guiding the paddle down the hull, I don't recall hitting them in the pry position.

  18. #18
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    Didn't notice any problem with the velcro getting in the way. However, I'm not someone who pries off the gunwhales normally, so wasn't something I paid attention to.

    As for the kneeling comments, Simon and I chatted about this and I think he'll be feeding that back. I'd say that once I'd got the dry bag in place as a kneeling saddle, it was just as comfy as my Ally, and just as connected, but there's definitely lots of room for improvement here (and on the Ally!) A foam kneeling saddle would help, but goes somewhat against the grain for a folding, portable, canoe.

    As Mary points out, the fact it come in two bags makes it a bit more of a handful for the solo traveller, but I think its a good thing when it comes to packing it in the boot, and that's more the target customer I'd see than the international traveller.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Grey View Post
    .....A foam kneeling saddle would help, but goes somewhat against the grain for a folding, portable, canoe.
    Not neccessarily a foam kneeling saddle but an inflatable kneeling seat could work. We brought an inflatable kneeling seat a few years ago with the intention to assist a disabled client using a folding kayak, but this particular seat was never used (another type of seat was used instead), so we still have this seat in storage and will dig this out to check on suitablity (the manufacturer's name escapes me so cannot find on the net). We also have fitted kneeling seats on whitewater catarafts that we are dealers of - we could investigate making a 'portable' version of this kneeling seat if there was a demand for it (hardshell and folding canoes).

    Edit - Sorry.... clarification.....with our catarafts, we call them kneeling seats, but now can see that they rather should be called saddles instead.... because your knees are on either side of the 'bum' support.
    Last edited by FoldingConcepts; 25th-September-2016 at 10:25 PM. Reason: clarification
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  20. #20
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    Thanks for the responses to my wonderings about the seats and the gunwales. Sorry, I wasn't clear in my point about the gunwales - I was meaning to question whether the Velcro would get in the way while sliding a paddle shaft down the gunwales as part of a stroke which has a levering element in it. Bill Mason is demonstrating what I mean at 5:30 in:

    https://www.nfb.ca/film/path_of_the_paddle_solo_basic/

    It sounds like it might not be a problem for most people.

  21. #21
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    most ingenious!

    I'm quite intrigued in the corrugated material - it is used for anything else besides folding canoes? maybe you need to brand it as Corrulex or Royagate to get people more interested

  22. #22
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    Really interesting to see the results of this try out. Firstly, well done to the reviewers for providing really decent information.

    The boat itself is a really interesting product and as has been said, is a good option for some paddlers. I'm sure it'll get better with the input and impetus from Folding Concepts too.
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Canoe outfitting packages in the Massif Central


  23. #23
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    An interesting boat , daft name tho, looks to be similar ( same?) material as the folding Oru kayaks.
    I think the seating needs redesigning as any added seating is increasing the weight of the package, which is already quite heavy.
    So we beat on,boats against the current,bourne back ceaselessly into the past.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by GMS View Post
    Thanks for the responses to my wonderings about the seats and the gunwales. Sorry, I wasn't clear in my point about the gunwales - I was meaning to question whether the Velcro would get in the way while sliding a paddle shaft down the gunwales as part of a stroke which has a levering element in it. Bill Mason is demonstrating what I mean at 5:30 in:

    https://www.nfb.ca/film/path_of_the_paddle_solo_basic/

    It sounds like it might not be a problem for most people.
    That's possibly how/where I was catching it, but not all of the time and not to a great extent.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by aannddyyhh View Post
    I'm quite intrigued in the corrugated material - it is used for anything else besides folding canoes? maybe you need to brand it as Corrulex or Royagate to get people more interested
    You are not too far from the truth.

    It looks like a product called Correx to me that is used for packaging.
    Pretty rigid stuff in one direction but folds easily in the other.

    I had some heavy duty sheets of this (still have) that I used for wheel arch liners on my Landrover and it stood up to the abuse very well and kept out mud and stones.
    In the right conditions I imagine it would form a very stiff hull but I wouldn't want to scrape it over anything or get pinned.
    With this in mind I bet it's a great flat water canoe, shame I didn't get chance to Join Mal on his paddle.

    I think Simon summed it up nicely:

    Quote Originally Posted by FoldingConcepts View Post
    The MyCanoe is not meant to be a heavy duty type of canoe. It is not meant to replace hardshell canoes. It is niche - it has characteristics and capabilities that hardshells does NOT have or CANNOT do.
    Bootstrap
    There's no such thing as inclement weather - you're just incorrectly dressed

  26. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bob View Post
    ..... It looks like a product called Correx to me that is used for packaging.
    Will find out who actually makes this polypropylene and see if what grade of toughness this is. It is certainly not the same as those used for Estate Agent sign boards, its is tougher and Correx looks similiar.

    Pretty rigid stuff in one direction but folds easily in the other.
    The way the pattern is set in the outer skin, accidental folds or creases where it should'nt be is rather difficult to make. The floor boards (outer case of box) is double thickness, does not appear easy to fold.

    I had some heavy duty sheets of this (still have) that I used for wheel arch liners on my Landrover and it stood up to the abuse very well and kept out mud and stones.
    In the right conditions I imagine it would form a very stiff hull but I wouldn't want to scrape it over anything or get pinned.
    With this in mind I bet it's a great flat water canoe, shame I didn't get chance to Join Mal on his paddle.
    That is interesting to hear that this stuff has been used in wheel arches, but possibly Correx that you have used could be of a much much tougher grade polypropylene? Ever get pinned? A rescue knife along the "grain" (flutes) should slice pretty quick.

    You are more than welcome to try the MyCanoe out at any time if you are local to Reading. Soon our try-out MyCanoe will be travelling further out to Poole, Cardiff, Norfolk and Yorkshire.
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  27. #27

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    It looks very interesting. It has potential for flat water touring in far-off lands, but the colour would put me off it. It doesn't actually matter, but I'd prefer to tour in something a bit less bright. My other thought is that it would be good to split the carrying/flight weight between two people, but it's not quite big enough to be a tandem expedition boat. Are there any plans for an "OurCanoe"? Although thinking of the weight difference between 14' and 16' Royalex boats, a bigger version might be significantly heavier and defeat the point.

  28. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_B View Post
    It looks very interesting. It has potential for flat water touring in far-off lands, but the colour would put me off it. It doesn't actually matter, but I'd prefer to tour in something a bit less bright. My other thought is that it would be good to split the carrying/flight weight between two people, but it's not quite big enough to be a tandem expedition boat. Are there any plans for an "OurCanoe"? Although thinking of the weight difference between 14' and 16' Royalex boats, a bigger version might be significantly heavier and defeat the point.
    We do agree that white is the wrong colour for serious canoeists - this boat was designed for a completely different market in another country where possibly most consumers lives in apartments / flats and do not have own cars and relies on public transport. Other colours are available but we need at order at least 50 boats of that colour. If there was consensus among the majority of SOTP members as to the one best colour, then we will just import, initially, that colour. After enough feedback from users here, then we can work towards arranging for better models to be made that will be more suitable for the UK market.

    Here are red, blue and green earlier model MyCanoe's ......





    You cannot really split the carrying weight of the box between two people as the outer skin is in one piece. The packed box weighs 15.9kg, so increasing the length by 1 to 2 feet, it should'nt increase the weight of the box that much. Then to cater for the extra length, possibly only one alu central cross rib with a thwart would be needed. So a longer boat should'nt weigh that much more.

    Here again - consensus from majority of SOTP members as to whether to create a 'OurCanoe' as a 15ft or 16ft.
    Last edited by FoldingConcepts; 29th-September-2016 at 10:14 AM. Reason: description correction
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoldingConcepts View Post
    If there was consensus among the majority of SOTP members as to the one best colour, then we will just import, initially, that colour.
    Good luck on that one.
    I am biased towards red although I would be concerned how colourfast the red is when used outside. I can imagine after a while there would be quite a few pink MyCanoes.
    Bootstrap
    There's no such thing as inclement weather - you're just incorrectly dressed

  30. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bob View Post
    Good luck on that one.
    I am biased towards red although I would be concerned how colourfast the red is when used outside. I can imagine after a while there would be quite a few pink MyCanoes.
    The colour is in the plastic itself and UV treated. It should be colour fast for a good couple of years unless the boat was stored outside in the sun all the time. I fail to see this happening as the MyCanoe is DESIGNED to be folded up and stored inside somewhere when not in use.

    What's wrong with pink boats ?
    Last edited by FoldingConcepts; 29th-September-2016 at 11:46 AM. Reason: clarity
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  31. #31

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    In case any of you who are interested in a MyCanoe and may have missed a separate post on this very busy site, an special SOPT discount deal has been posted under the 'Dealer Offers' section.

    Also, if any of you would like to try out the MyCanoe, you are more than welcome - just let us know. Obviously as we are based in Reading, Berkshire so will try our best to accomodate requests within a reasonable driving distance from Reading, with tryouts at Poole and Bristol planned within the next 2-3 weeks. We are looking to loan the MyCanoe to Gregandginas at Huddersfield, Yorkshire - to organise try-outs around that area, from the end of October onwards.
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  32. #32
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    Another opportunity to paddle the MyCanoe came up, so I was on the water earlier today (for a short paddle) and will be on the water again tomorrow to test it still further!

    Tuesday 18th October



    I headed down to Poole Harbour this morning to complete a short paddle in fairly windy conditions, to see how the boat would behave - there was a steady F3/4 blowing with the occasional stronger gust, so I had decided to stay in the more sheltered Holes Bay, rather than venture into the harbour proper.

    This is my second paddle of the MyCanoe, but my first to assemble the boat from scratch on my own - how much of what Simon had told me would I remember? I threw my PFD, phone, drybag, bailer and cap into the canoe's carry bag and lay my paddle over the top, meaning I only had to worry about carrying the two MyCanoe bags to the foreshore.

    I'd parked on a quiet residential road, right next to a footpath to the shore, some 50yds long and with direct access to the water - the 25kg combined weight was nothing to carry this distance and was certainly a whole load easier than putting my canoe on it's trolley, which I would have had to do under normal circumstances.

    Once by the shore, I started the stopwatch and started the build per my memorised time with Simon. 16 minutes later the boat was fully assembled and ready to hit the water - it is so quick and easy to do!

    I launched from the sheltered shoreline by Cobbs Quay Marina and avoided all of the wind until I turned North around the end of the marina - this gave me a few minutes to readjust myself to the MyCanoe, which as you will have read above, requires a half kneeling posture due to the bracing ribs in the hull. I set the seat as close as possible to the middle of the boat to centre my weight and had brought along an empty 30l drybag, should I need additional ballast.

    As I turned around the end of the marina, I manoeuvred forward slightly to keep the bow settled and continued paddling on my right side, this seemed to keep the canoe heading in the right direction without the need for additional ballast. What I was aware of however (with the wind on my front left quarter), was that I was crabbing to the right quite quickly - the wind on the side of the hull was pushing me sideways quite effectively, so the next mile to the railway bridge was going to be one long ferry glide!

    That being said, forward progress was good and I covered the mile at an average of 3mph, which I thought was very reasonable. With the tide being a spring, the clearance under the bridge was limited, but sufficient and I was carried under on the last hour of the incoming tide - I headed over to the southerly tip of Pergin's Island, to complete some unfinished business... I'd accidentally left my tarp ridge line on the trees after my wild camp last weekend! Ridge line recovered, I decided to see if I could complete a full lap of the island with the help of this high tide, so set off for a clockwise lap.





    The wind in the upper reaches of Holes Bay is reduced due to the proximity of the shoreline trees and caused me no issues at all, the boat paddled beautifully through the shallows to the north of the island and responded to my turning strokes much better than my Apache Tribe - certainly made for easier work through the meandering channel.



    Having passed the most northerly point, I paddled down the leeward side of the island and then turned east to head back under the railway bridge, which now had another 10cm less headroom than before. This presented the only time that I felt my paddling ability was compromised - with the wind almost head on, I struggled to decide whether I was better off paddling on left or right and ended up weathercocking in most instances - this was probably the time to add ballast in the nose, but I changed tack, rather literally.

    Instead of going directly head into wind, I tacked right towards the island and paddled on my right side to compensate for the wind, I then tacked left towards the bridge and switched to paddling on my left side, to compensate for the wind once more - this worked very effectively and saved me flooding my drybag.

    After squeezing back under the bridge, I took a route closer to the shore, which then allowed me to run with the waves back down to Cobbs Quay - I sat back on the seat, lifted the bow clear of the water and fairly flew back down the harbour - she's paddles downwind a treat!

    The wind was howling though the masts of the yachts as I passed the marina and the halyards were slapping nicely, indicating a good wind for sailing, but the MyCanoe had performed faultlessly in less than ideal paddling weather.

    As I neared the end of the marina, I re-centred my position, rebalancing the boat, bow ruddered tight under the noses of the multimillion pound Sunseekers, and headed back to my launch site.

    Once ashore, the stopwatch was restarted, and 7 minutes later stopped, as I left the foreshore all packed up.

    Once back at the car, I slid the box and bag into the boot, packed my drysuit, paddle, PFD and sundries and drove off, thinking how much longer that would have taken with my conventional rigid canoe - I don't think I was kerbside for more than 5 minutes.

    Another great day out, further demonstrating the MyCanoe's ability to paddle in a variety of circumstances.

    The boat is now home, hosed off and drying, ready for tomorrow's adventure in Poole Harbour proper with another member of Poole Harbour Canoe Club - details to follow!



    P.S. The picture above is just the hull without the ribs fitted, so please don't think this is the finished hull shape!

  33. #33
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    Another well put together review of what is obviously a decent option for those wanting a portable, storable boat.
    The responsiveness of the guys selling it also is a help too. Good luck with it
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Canoe outfitting packages in the Massif Central


  34. #34

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    Another excellent informative review, under different conditions done so far, from Adrian. As before, added all sorts of stats! Many thanks.

    Looking forward to see if Adrian can improve on the assembly time on his next trip of which I am sure he can! So far, my private assembly time (most have been demos) is around 7-8 minutes. To be honest, the bulk of the time is down to fitting the gunwale caps, which requires a little skill to master which naturally will come the more you use the boat. The gunwale caps is easy to fit on quickly should you decide to have a big rocker (all gussets closed tight), but for most the canoe works best without a rocker. I think with just the gussets tightened where the gunwales curves the most, will possibly the best compromised setting (time, convenience and rocker).
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  35. #35
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    Wednesday 19th October

    So another day, another paddle!

    I headed down to Lake Pier, Hamworthy, which is the home to Poole Harbour Canoe Club and ideally, approximately the midpoint of the harbour, so you can paddle east or west, to ride the tide both ways - today however, I was not planning to cover a huge distance, just explore the behaviour of the MyCanoe on open water.

    My planned company was unable to attend at the last minute, so an extended trip was not on the cards.

    With the GoPro running, I hit the start button on the stopwatch, could my 3rd build meet the published time? Yes it could - 10 minutes and the boat was fully built (all caught on video)! I even managed to chat to a lady about the boat for the final minute or so of the build!

    Those familiar with Poole Harbour will know that invariably there is a steady wind blowing from the SW, however today it was confused and chose to blow from the W/NW, but at least it was a steady F3. There was a steady short chop on the surface, enhanced occasionally by passing boats.







    Due to the more open nature of this paddle, I added a couple of drybags as ballast in the bow, just to help keep it planted.

    I set off towards the southern shore of the harbour, towards the Arne Nature Reserve on the Purbeck peninsula - I was paddling against the wind (it was on my right front quarter), so again experienced the crabbing I had yesterday - this wasn't a problem, as I ferry glided across the harbour, comfortably riding the wake of a couple of passing fishing boats.

    The boat rode the chop and the wake of the boats very comfortably, there is a little more initial wobble than my Apache Tribe, but the secondary stability is superb and gives you real confidence.

    The journey across is only 3/4 mile, so before long I was paddling parallel to the shore, heading for a small beach I knew would still be visible above the spring tide - I again struggled to paddle directly head into wind and found that tacking allowed me to make better forward progress.

    I did try kneeling in the boat to improve my connection and deliver more power in an effort to paddle head into wind, which worked to some degree, but until a saddle or other kneeling solution can be found, it isn't practical for more than a couple of minutes. This being said, the more I paddle the MyCanoe, the more I get used to paddling it with one leg tucked under and the other outstretched, just touching the back edge of the front seat - I find this gives me a good connection to the boat and allows me to switch the tucked leg with relative ease when I lose feelings!









    After a little lunch and coffee, I set back off across the harbour, allowing the wind and tide to gently push me back down towards Lake Pier - the ferry gliding is particularly evident on the video which I shall upload shortly.

    On landing I met a couple of members of Poole Harbour Canoe Club, who'd been out kayaking - they came over to examine the Origami canoe with great interest - the weight, solidity, price and manner of disassembly were all positively commented on - it was apparent they could see the niche that this boat falls into.

    The MyCanoe has happily accepted all of the conditions I have thrown at it and has left me feeling comfortable and secure whilst paddling it. The benefits of having a light folding canoe are tremendous, the more time you paddle the MyCanoe, the more you appreciate them.

    The colour of the MyCanoe has been commented on by several people, myself included - possibly just canoeists searching for normality in greens and reds... but I must say, the more photos I take of it, the better I like the unconventional white - it stands out from the crowd and draws plenty of comments

    No more car topping
    No more storage problems at home
    No more strain from lifting +30kg boats

  36. #36
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    nice write-ups - you seem quite taken with the Canorigamoe

  37. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by aannddyyhh View Post
    nice write-ups - you seem quite taken with the Canorigamoe
    A what?

    Many thanks to Adrian again for the lovely photos and it was good to see various input. It was planned to try out in tandem mode, so that will have to wait for another day. Possibly PHCC club members will be willing to have a go this weekend?
    Last edited by FoldingConcepts; 19th-October-2016 at 06:42 PM. Reason: addition
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  38. #38
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    Nice one, Adrian, good to hear the canoe is performing well in open water conditions with wind, which isn't a surprise to me having paddled it.
    Covering as many malmiles as possible before being distracted by the pub!

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Northwich
    Posts
    3,242

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    Great write up and all very interesting stuff!
    To Canoe is to be moved!!!

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Poole
    Posts
    564

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    Some video from the 'sea trials', including the 10 minute assembly:


  41. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianO View Post
    Some video from the 'sea trials', including the 10 minute assembly:

    Adrian managed to stick to his time test, whilst still being polite to the lady!

    A lovely video report, thank you .... am still tempted to get myself a drone that will automatically follow at a discrete distance to film my trips.
    Simon Bolze
    Folding Concepts
    Reading, Berks
    Foldable boat Specialists - folding / inflatable kayaks / canoes, and catarafts
    www.foldingkayaks.co.uk - www.neris.co.uk - www.waylandkayaks.co.uk

  42. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    3,780

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    Is there any news on the 2.6 version designed to accommodate solo paddlers?
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

  43. #43

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    I wrote to the co. That supposedly was redisigning for solo paddlers. Never replied back!

  44. #44

    Default

    Has anyone tried out the plus version of Mycanoe.

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