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Thread: Different canoe types.

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    Default Different canoe types.

    Hi, I'm a bit confused about the different styles of canoe I keep hearing about. It just to satisfy a curiosity. I've looked on Wikipedia and I've searched here, I don't really know how to phrase it in a search. Basically, people say "prospector" or "guide" and so on. How many types are there and what do they look like? If anyone could hit this nail on the head for me I'd be very greatfull. it may seem simple so I apologise, but I'm new here and my signature (nicked from faulty towers) says it all.

    Many thanks, Rob
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob thompson View Post
    [...] How many types are there and what do they look like? [...]
    As many as one can think of

    But in the canoe industry the basic distinction for recreational use is often made between "touring" and "whitewater" canoes, with of course some overlap as some touring designs are quite capable for whitewater use. Touring canoes that are deliberately designed for whitewater use are often called "whitewater canoes" or "river canoes".

    Dirk Barends

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    Thanks for the info Dirk, but I need more!!!!! Admixtures, what is a guide canoe? What is a prospector canoe? I heat these all the time, yet there seems to be no classification anywhere
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    Lots of auto correct in there! Sorry
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    I'm a relative newbie to canoes & was somewhat mystified by the "types" initially too. I don't think it helps that there are so many variables - length, hull profile, rocker, hull shape, etc. - that can be combined in many ways that the variants are somewhat fluid, even within the confines of touring-type canoes that most people on here paddle. racing & full-on white-water boats are another kettle of fish entirely!

    general types:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canoe#Touring_and_camping

    a Prospector, tends to be an all-rounder suited to touring, but with sufficient rocker to be agile on moderate white-water. it also tends to have rather more hull above the water-line at the bow & stern than a purely flat-water boat to allow it to cut through the bumpy stuff without taking on too much water. however the additional above-water hull can make it susceptible to being blown around in the wind rather more than a lower-profile boat designed for flat-water

    I've not come across the term "guide" as a type, although there is an Old Town model of this name

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    Quote Originally Posted by canonymous View Post
    As many as one can think of

    But in the canoe industry the basic distinction for recreational use is often made between "touring" and "whitewater" canoes, with of course some overlap as some touring designs are quite capable for whitewater use. Touring canoes that are deliberately designed for whitewater use are often called "whitewater canoes" or "river canoes".

    Dirk Barends
    Adding to the confusion, I made a mistake here , and it should be:
    Touring canoes that are deliberately designed for whitewater use are often called "whitewater touring canoes" or "river touring canoes".

    Dirk Barends

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    Quote Originally Posted by aannddyyhh View Post
    [...]
    I've not come across the term "guide" as a type, although there is an Old Town model of this name
    In Maine (USA) touring canoes that were intended for professional use by the guides there and so, were called "guide" canoes then. They were more utilitarian in design, that is they did not have those high recurved bows that were so common there in that time for recreational use

    Dirk Barends

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob thompson View Post
    Thanks for the info Dirk, but I need more!!!!! Admixtures, what is a guide canoe? What is a prospector canoe? I heat these all the time, yet there seems to be no classification anywhere
    In general a Prospector canoe is some kind of all-round touring canoe wich is dry, stable and maneuverable enough to be suitable for use on whitewater. If they are made from a strong(er) material they can be called "river touring canoes", see for instance:
    http://www.swiftcanoe.com/#!river-touring/c15qs
    http://www.swiftcanoe.com/#!classic-canoes/cv0o


    Dirk Barends
    Last edited by canonymous; 27th-August-2016 at 06:45 AM.

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    Thanks, is mine a prospector? It has straight down sides but minimal rocker.
    https://www.flickr.com/gp/144718910@N02/uM22w8
    Thanks for the help.
    Rob
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob thompson View Post
    Thanks, is mine a prospector? It has straight down sides but minimal rocker.
    https://www.flickr.com/gp/144718910@N02/uM22w8
    Thanks for the help.
    Rob
    It's hard to tell how much rocker a boat has when it's upside down in a picture, but yours doesn't look like a prospector.
    If you scroll down slowly through the pics in this thread http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...135#post619135

    you'll see that there are a few prospectors in amongst them, and generally the difference between them and yours is easy to spot.
    Nin Wanakiwidee Tchiman

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob thompson View Post
    Thanks, is mine a prospector? It has straight down sides but minimal rocker.
    https://www.flickr.com/gp/144718910@N02/uM22w8
    Thanks for the help.
    Rob
    I would not call that design a Prospector, as in my opinion a Prospector design should have some tumblehome, substantial rocker and a certain sheer line with recurved stems which this design does not seem to have.

    Dirk Barends

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob thompson View Post
    Thanks, is mine a prospector? It has straight down sides but minimal rocker.
    https://www.flickr.com/gp/144718910@N02/uM22w8
    Thanks for the help.
    Rob
    It looks similar in shape and style to a Peterborough in many ways.

    Peterborough is a Canadian canoe manufacturer who made boats from 1892 and 1961. The shape and style with a slight V-hull, minimal rocker, relatively low freeboard, upturned stems and a slight tumblehome is a design classic. They are well suited to open water use with straight tracking and good secondary stability. Less suited to moving water but still pretty capable in that environment, although they will be harder to turn and easier to swamp than a prospector.

    They make up for this by being easy to paddle in a straight line, fast and less prone to being blown about.

    I've just made a very similar one from plywood based on the Peterborough design.
    "I'm not getting in a boat which is DESIGNED to go upside down."

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    Your question about how many kinds and what do canoes look like, is changing all the time. This is a link to some that are for sale. http://www.canoekayak.com/pa_product-type/canoes/

    That it is the tip of the iceberg of what kinds. They don't show the head canoes, shovel nosed canoes, voyager canoe, dragon boat, outrigger canoes, double canoes or strange canoes like the paper canoe, balsa wood canoe, geodesic canoe or chopstick canoe.
    Last edited by Dr. Joe; 31st-August-2016 at 04:59 AM.
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    Some great information there guys. I'm going to study this in my own time tonight to try and I D my canoe. Thank you, Rob.
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    Basically you have;

    River canoes; high sides, heavy on the portage trail, good in white water, not great in the wind
    Lake Canoes; low sides, lighter on the portage trail. good in the wind, not great in white water
    Specialist canoes; mostly they are a myth, I don't think they exist

    12-14 foot; good for solo day use and good for kids
    15 foot; good for cottage use, solo or tandem day trips or a minimalist weekender
    16 foot; good for camping, excels at the weekender, both solo and tandem, falls short on the expedition
    17-18 foot; good for tandem expedition canoeing, falls short for all but expert solo paddlers,
    20 foot; the North America "guide canoe"

    Plastic; Has ups and downs but pretty low maintenance
    Composite; Has ups and downs and is high maintainance
    Wood; Has ups and downs and is high maintenance but looks sexy
    Metal; Has ups and downs and is low maintenance... like forget it in the woods for 20 years with no worries
    Lloyd

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd View Post
    Basically you have;

    River canoes; high sides, heavy on the portage trail, good in white water, not great in the wind
    Lake Canoes; low sides, lighter on the portage trail. good in the wind, not great in white water
    Specialist canoes; mostly they are a myth, I don't think they exist

    12-14 foot; good for solo day use and good for kids
    15 foot; good for cottage use, solo or tandem day trips or a minimalist weekender
    16 foot; good for camping, excels at the weekender, both solo and tandem, falls short on the expedition
    17-18 foot; good for tandem expedition canoeing, falls short for all but expert solo paddlers,
    20 foot; the North America "guide canoe"

    Plastic; Has ups and downs but pretty low maintenance
    Composite; Has ups and downs and is high maintainance
    Wood; Has ups and downs and is high maintenance but looks sexy
    Metal; Has ups and downs and is low maintenance... like forget it in the woods for 20 years with no worries

    So basicly,my sexy cedar strip 18' possible lake canoe. Is not really the boat for a novice paddler like myself !!! After my last journey , I'd be inclined to agree a bit ! Although, on the upside I can carry it easy and it goes in a straight line well. As long as I don't need to turn I'll be fine. But I do like a bit of a challenge, so I'm gonna work on that. I need to work on turning it about for sure. I tried heeling it over and the gunwale was in the water on the slightest shift over to the side. I was kneeling while resting my behind on the bow seat. I'll try heeling from the yolk next time, maybe iill get those ends out of the water a bit.
    Thanks for the pointers
    Rob
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    Metal; Has ups and downs and is low maintenance... like forget it in the woods for 20 years with no worries[/QUOTE]

    I think metal boats are ugly. Nothing paint can't fix though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd View Post
    Basically you have;

    River canoes; high sides, heavy on the portage trail, good in white water, not great in the wind
    Lake Canoes; low sides, lighter on the portage trail. good in the wind, not great in white water
    Specialist canoes; mostly they are a myth, I don't think they exist

    12-14 foot; good for solo day use and good for kids
    15 foot; good for cottage use, solo or tandem day trips or a minimalist weekender
    16 foot; good for camping, excels at the weekender, both solo and tandem, falls short on the expedition
    17-18 foot; good for tandem expedition canoeing, falls short for all but expert solo paddlers,
    20 foot; the North America "guide canoe"

    Plastic; Has ups and downs but pretty low maintenance
    Composite; Has ups and downs and is high maintainance
    Wood; Has ups and downs and is high maintenance but looks sexy
    Metal; Has ups and downs and is low maintenance... like forget it in the woods for 20 years with no worries
    You haven't mentioned hull aspect ratios, rockers, mods, royalex, tuff stuff, famous designers, colours, buoyancy, lacing, heeling, kneeling, knitting, sitting on your arse, thwarts, gunnels, prospectors, trappers, poachers, gamekeepers, Indian sounding names, rarity, sails, outboards, kelly kettles or freestyle.

    Come on!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    You haven't mentioned hull aspect ratios, rockers, mods, royalex, tuff stuff, famous designers, colours, buoyancy, lacing, heeling, kneeling, knitting, sitting on your arse, thwarts, gunnels, prospectors, trappers, poachers, gamekeepers, Indian sounding names, rarity, sails, outboards, kelly kettles or freestyle.

    Come on!

    Show off !
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    You haven't mentioned hull aspect ratios, rockers, mods, royalex, tuff stuff, famous designers, colours, buoyancy, lacing, heeling, kneeling, knitting, sitting on your arse, thwarts, gunnels, prospectors, trappers, poachers, gamekeepers, Indian sounding names, rarity, sails, outboards, kelly kettles or freestyle.

    Come on!
    We already have Greg for exposition. I am the "just the facts ma'am" guy.
    Lloyd

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