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Thread: Finding a little slice of heaven in Scotland

  1. #1

    Default Finding a little slice of heaven in Scotland

    We weren’t originally the most adventurous of people but a life time of being tied to a computer made something snap. It is time to get out into the real world, be present and make some memories. The world we forget with our faces buried in technology day in and day out. A quest to be free.
    It was time to push ourselves, or so we thought. Loch Morar was our target destination as people had said it was a little more foreboding as the Norfolk broads had been a bit tame.
    We set off to Scotland with the canoe perched top the Punto – Looking ridiculous top heavy but fit for purpose.


    We had spent time prepping for these trips with practice runs on the local canal. Testing out the loading with the dry bags and more importantly training our dog Inca to get in and out on command and sit and lie still.
    Here she is looking less than impressed during a rainy training practise. @inca_boxer

    I also made a ‘wannigan’ (well more of a crate) out of old palettes for the trip and this is the lighter mark 2 version with the boards planed down to wine box thickness to make it lighter. However we hadn’t had chance to test it in the canoe before leaving so therefore weren’t sure how the weight would affect the freeboard. It was heavy with a week’s worth of food in. The one thing I learnt while making these boxes is make them 4 boards high and the sides 4 boards wide (minus the wood thickness) so that the lid fits. The length is down to your canoe width. (I can supply more detail if anyone is interested but it’s pretty straight forward)


    I added a compass design on top to help with finding things in the box – So I could say “where’s the milk Charlotte?” and she could reply “it’s on the east side or west side” but in practice it didn’t quite work out that way as Charlotte struggles with east and west as much as here left and right.








    We sailed to Scotland with many stops to tighten and adjust the straps to stop the canoe shifting. Having to go down to about 55mph with the strong winds blowing us sideways which mean we arrived late. It was chucking it down as we drove past Loch Lomond with the water looking extremely choppy. No boats were out braving the waters. A quick re – check of the weather of Loch Morar showed it was suffering stronger winds than Loch Lomond. There wasn’t much point in rushing there so we pulled in at Beinglas campsite, set up the tent up in the wind and rain and decided to go for a walk to the Falls of Falloch.
    They were stunning and the amount of thundering water coming over them was very dramatic.

    We did a spot of mushroom foraging – a recent hobby and we are still building on our skills. Finding Wood hedgehogs (easy to identify with the spines rather than gills) and Chanterelles within minutes around the falls. It is such a lovely treasure finding feeling when you find edible varieties. (It’s becoming a bit of a passion)





    Returning to base camp our tent had blown down and everything inside was drenched! Except, luckily, the sleeping bags which I had said we should put in the dry bags so they wouldn’t get damp. However there is a walker’s shelter at campsite which has dryers so jostling through the many other soggy walkers in there we made use of them. We were glad at this point to not be out on the loch in the wind and rain. Lesson learnt and now pegged down properly. After probably the worst night’s sleep and bad dreams in the world’s flappiest tent. We got up and pack up in the wet and set off with dampened spirits. Our adventure had got off to a terrible start. We checked the weather at Loch Morar and the forecast was rain and 35mph gusts. After seeing what Loch Lomond had looked like the day before in those conditions we decided to turn back. A coffee was needed regroup. We pulled in at Tarbet on the side of Loch Lomond, found coffee and wifi. A quick check of Paddle Points said you could launch from Tarbet. The loch looked calm from the café and the weather forecast for the next few days in this area was good. Decision made.
    There’s a slipway which is gated with a sign saying ring access, but don’t bother unless you live in the area and have the correct postcode. There is no parking restriction so you can dump the car and port around the gates to the slipway.


    All loaded up, ready to set off and the doomed black clouds come over. I must say I was impressed how much freeboard was still left with the canoe fully loaded. The wannigan fitted well and Charlotte had lightened it a bit by removing a few days’ food.


    With the rain right on us Charlotte sat it out in the boat - “You’ll get wet there Charlotte” “I know but just as wet as on the shore.”
    I know it doesn’t sound much to a seasoned canoer but we were a little nervous about doings our first open water crossing with the dog and fully loaded up so we waited the few minutes for the rain to pass. A nice looking beach on the other side, directly across from Tarbet so decided to head for that. The loch is 150m deep at this point on the north end of the loch and there would be no way to get stuff back off the bottom (everything was strapped with cam straps to the canoe though and dry-bagged up).


    The beach looked lovely, our holiday had begun. Once at the other side we paddled up and down a bit to view some other landings, but none looked quite as nice and the original spot and was furthest away from the west highland way.

    A little soggy but the sun was soon to follow.
    Mooring up on the beach we were greeted by more chanterelles mushrooms - Yep this was going to be our little piece of heaven.



    and yes Charlotte there is a rope swing.
    Come on time to set up camp.


    Tentipi up and properly pegged out this time! It is a great tent and we have a frontier stove for those wet and cold nights. We camped up from the shore and dragged the canoe up there.


    We set about collecting firewood for tea putting the new sliky into action; a brilliant little saw and easier than chopping.


    After that a quick explore of the area which is probably best describe with pictures.





    Crystal clear waters.

    We set about finding a water source and agreed to do a forage on the way. Heading north to the first spring on the map but in the end not really fast flowing enough but we did found loads of interesting mushrooms on the way, with the other beaches yielding more chanterelles.


    The wannigan makes a good table too.

    Amethyst Deceiver – Good for colour in a dish.

    Our first beefsteak fungus – Kindly stood on by our wonderful dog, but still edible though.
    Food found and wood chopped so time for a relax on the beach with a glass of wine (if only the dog would let you). We had enough water for a day and a bit so we decide we would canoe down to a larger stream south the next day.



    The wind was dropping so the mozzies were moving in. Skin so soft by Avon is just the best protection and you can use it on the dog too. Time for a fire as smoke works well too in keeping them under bay.



    I am a bit of a nerd when lighting fires and like to do it the hard way. I suppose I am an armchair survivalist and like to learn fire lighting skills. I can start a fire with bow but I also use an old fashioned tinder kit. We cooked on the beach on the south side as it was sheltered from the wind.



    Flint and steel and char cloth work great and gives you plenty of time to get your tinder on. It’s also less easy to loose than a lighter - something I am very good at.
    It has a little hole in for making charcloth too.
    Also have a modern flint and high carbon steel striker (from the Bushcraft show) and a magnesium block for difficult conditions. It is just a bit of fun but I like learning the old skills. The most important being the bow and drill.
    So while I’ve been faffing with the fire Charlotte was busy prepping food stuff. She is a campcook wizard producing doughnuts, pizza, damper bread and I am going to pass you over to her for this section about what she cooked.
    The first night I decided to cook pizza in our dutch oven. Prepping the dough so it could rise while we finished getting the fire ready. Cooking fresh is what I prefere to do and will whenever we can, it’s quite easy to carry some fresh produce with you, especially in the box that Ant has made. Onions, potaoes, garlic and dry meats all keep well out of the fridge as well as being knocked around in the canoe journey. Wedges were the next thing which I add a bit of oil and some spice (keeping old TicTac containers or herb bottles are a great way of carrying herbs and spices when camping). With the dough done, a bit of greaseproof paper at the bottom helps it not to stick to the dutch oven, and add on all your ingredients. All ready for the fire!






    I had to fashion a quick pan lifter. It worked well and so won’t bother taking the metal one ever again.



    Pizza cooking – A lot of fire on top and resting on ashes underneath with potato wedges in doubled billy cans.




    Inca is not a fan of campfire smoke however she does play a silly game of putting her rock in the way of it and then barking at it - Boxer dog logic. Maybe I should explain she is obsessed with rocks, her favourite rock of choice at the moment is quartz. Yep quartz. Here she is with a great lump of it wedged in her face.



    We end up having to hide it so here she is panicking because she can’t find it.

    It’s no use trying to throw it away she will find no matter where you it lands. She is a brilliant guard dog too and sets up a perimeter around the camp by having a good old bark to make sure people and the giant goats and stags (we found fresh droppings of both within 200m of the camp) stay away. The mere mention of the word “see ‘em off” is enough to set this process off in an instant.


    Even having the luxury of a gin and tonic on the beach - We made a flask up before we left and put it in the red ‘thirst extinguisher’.


    With full bellies the fire was built up for the rest of the evening. Here we are trying to melt away two beer cans left by walkers. I am always saddened when I see rubbish even in the remotest areas, we often do a litter pick wherever we stay.
    Inca tells us when it’s her bed time by pawing at the tent. She has a good water proof bed which we use in and out of the canoe for her.

    In the tent she is wrapped her own sleeping bag and jumper, so all nicely wrapped up she stays put for the whole evening. We stayed up and had to set up a tarp over us as a bit of rain was coming in, moved the fire and spent a while chatting.
    The next morning coffee to start.

    [IMG]file:///C:\Users\RATSH_~1\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\ 01\clip_image102.jpg[/IMG]I heat my UHT milk in the mug over the burner and use a milk frother whisk and the coffee pot for a cappuccino. It works well but I’m always looking out for a better more compact method.
    Chanterelles for breakfast J
    For breakfast I had spring onions, the chanterelle mushrooms found yesterday, some dry sausage and peppers (using a dehydrator at home), chopped tomatoes and finishing it off with an egg each on top. A mighty breakfast for a good start to the day.
    With a cold night ahead of us, feels like minus 3°!?, we cut more wood for the frontier stove and an evening in the tent.
    Heading off in the canoe for a water run down the south side of the loch. Filling our container from a source a bit further down the shore we put in sterilising tables (first time using sterilising tablets and I can say I’m not a great fan).
    We also did another spot of foraging for a few hours, yielding more hedgehogs and a Lactarius Volemus – edible and good. We found a lot more too that I won’t bore you with


    Thanks to Jesper Launder for ID help. I am learning a lot for him and the Mushroom Foraging United Kingdom Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/242093029305785/
    Plus the all-important Rogers Phillips Guide. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mushrooms-R.../dp/0330442376





    The second night was a vegetable curry with all the hardy vegetables that we brought with us and some of the foraged mushrooms. Some damper bread as naan bread was also needed! With the dough rising I prepped the curry and left that cooking over the fire. The damper bread was cooked in the double billy cans with a little oil and cooked lovely! Wrapped in tin foil to keep warm while we used the billy cans to cook the rice.
    The curry needed extra heat so it needed a tripod.

    More wine, more laughing and games by a beautiful camp fire on the other beach this time.
    With calm waters forecast in the morning we decide an early start to pack up sounds like the best
    Going to bed, lighting the frontier stove to keep warm, it burned for about 5 hours but then had to be re-lit, still it was a very comfortable night.
    Rising early we packed away the tent with the loch looking like a mirror at 7.45 am, it did get a bit choppier as time went on. We managed to get the Tentipi down and packed in a dry bag just before a shower hit. Leaving a load of sawn logs and kindling by the fire pit for the next visitors; which is just a nice thing to do.


    That was it all pack up and ready to head back. The return crossing was easy and very calm. We ported everything back to the car and headed home, batteries recharged, super memories and lessons learnt.
    Last edited by Ant_Gregroy; 14th-August-2016 at 11:12 PM.

  2. #2
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    what a lucky dog !! Great pictures of a wonderful looking trip

  3. #3

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    Wow sounds like you had a great time after the initial lesson, a beautiful location & some great pictures too I can't wait to do something like this one day

    beautiful dog to full of character by the looks of it

  4. #4

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    Aw thank you. It's our first blog so thanks for commenting. Inca loved it and is more thank happy to travel in the canoe.

  5. #5

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    It was a magic little spot. Can't wait to do it again soon. Thanks for commenting. Yes she is, maybe a little too much at times

  6. #6
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    A cracking account of what appears to have been a great adventure, illustrated with some stunning photographs!


    I did spend ages studying this photo...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ant_Gregroy View Post

    ...trying to figure out how on earth you managed to fit two adult humans and a boxer dog in that canoe!
    Juvanile delinkwit, vaguely faffing around with a pair of pliers. Du skal ikke tro at du er bedre end mig!

  7. #7
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    Great blogg. I look at the same picture as Rockhopper and wonder how two people and a dog have such an empty canoe

    Almost all my trips are at Loch Lomond. It's a great place when you find a good spot away from the crowds. As for water I just take it straight from the Loch and boil it. I used to use an MSR filter but boiling is easier.
    John

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiKelly View Post
    Great blogg. I look at the same picture as Rockhopper and wonder how two people and a dog have such an empty canoe

    Almost all my trips are at Loch Lomond. It's a great place when you find a good spot away from the crowds. As for water I just take it straight from the Loch and boil it. I used to use an MSR filter but boiling is easier.
    Hey thanks for commenting and pointing me to that MSR filter. It looks an excellent piece of kit. We have Sawyer Mini that we normally use but thought we'd try the tablets as it takes time to filter water with the mini. Looks like your kit would do it in a much better time. The tablets didn't taste good. As for getting it from the loch- I am super causious after having Crypto twice in my life time (not from Scotland though) but with a good filter or boiling I'm sure it is fine especially now I know you've tested it .

    I am supper surprised too at how much we fitted in the canoe . When you see it filling the boot of the car it looks very little in the canoe. We had more than enough stuff too. Pillows, beds and chairs. Enough food for days.
    Loch Lomond is beautiful I don't blame you.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockhopper View Post
    A cracking account of what appears to have been a great adventure, illustrated with some stunning photographs!


    I did spend ages studying this photo...



    ...trying to figure out how on earth you managed to fit two adult humans and a boxer dog in that canoe!

    Hehe - We are too. Still quite a bit of space left. I think we will do a load out blog at somepoint. We spent a while trying to get our kit as small and compact as possible. At least now we can start to add some extras now we know it fits well.

  10. #10
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    Mind you, I am no stranger to filling a canoe, myself! My bow-paddler, Kevin, and I once squeezed ourselves into this for five days to paddle Lough Neagh and the River Bann!



    There would have been no room for a boxer dog, though... or even a boxer matches!
    Juvanile delinkwit, vaguely faffing around with a pair of pliers. Du skal ikke tro at du er bedre end mig!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockhopper View Post
    Mind you, I am no stranger to filling a canoe, myself! My bow-paddle and I once squeezed ourselves into this to paddle Lough Neagh and the River Bann!

    There would have been no room for a boxer dog, though... or even a boxer matches!
    That's amazing. How much weight can these things take? - Just reading it's around 450kg . nearly half a metric tonne.
    What's the duck for?

  12. #12
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    Dave the Decoy Duck? It's all sketchily explained in this blog, if you've got the stamina and will-power to slog your way through it!
    Juvanile delinkwit, vaguely faffing around with a pair of pliers. Du skal ikke tro at du er bedre end mig!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockhopper View Post
    Dave the Decoy Duck? It's all sketchily explained in this blog, if you've got the stamina and will-power to slog your way through it!
    Now I see how you and Dave became such good pals.

  14. #14
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    Really enjoyed reading that. Excellent blog and pictures of your first canoe/camping trip. Careful, its addictive.
    Matto

    Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.


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    great blog & pictures - glad to see you had good weather at least some of the time

    I'd love to paddle Loch Lomond & camp on the islands - I just wish Scotland wasn't so far away!

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matto View Post
    Really enjoyed reading that. Excellent blog and pictures of your first canoe/camping trip. Careful, its addictive.
    Thanks for taking the time to read it. It was fun writing but more fun doing the trip. First time we managed to put both canoing and camping together. We can't wait to go again. we wish Scotland was closer or the we had the same right to roam in England. We did another longer trip around the broads which we are writing up but that was camping with canoing although still excellent fun. Yes we are addicted.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by aannddyyhh View Post
    great blog & pictures - glad to see you had good weather at least some of the time

    I'd love to paddle Loch Lomond & camp on the islands - I just wish Scotland wasn't so far away!
    thank you. It's worth the trip but catching good weather there is a bit of a lottery

  18. #18
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    Really enjoyed the blog, a good mix of the three c's that make up a great trip out in Scotland canoeing, camping and cooking.
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Really enjoyed the blog, a good mix of the three c's that make up a great trip out in Scotland canoeing, camping and cooking.
    Thanks a lot Tim. We been enjoying camping for a few years and love cooking outdoors. To add a canoe into the mix has just been the best experience. Thanks for taking the time to read it. We are now both back to work and tied to a computer dreaming of the next time we can go out.

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    Fantastic blogg with interesting words & cracking photos. Inca does look quite at home so as long as she has good balance to sit on top of the wannigan !
    Death is natures way of telling you to slow down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxiP View Post
    Fantastic blogg with interesting words & cracking photos. Inca does look quite at home so as long as she has good balance to sit on top of the wannigan !
    Haha that would lead to an interesting journey. Thanks as well for the kind comments on our first blog.

  22. #22
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    Really enjoyed the blogg, and the good pics,looks like it was a very good trip,but i don't know what your dog thought about it.

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    Well done....cracking blog with some lovely photos.......from a fellow Tentipi owner.
    A ship should not ride on a single anchor, nor life on a single hope - Epictetus

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by slavetothepaddle View Post
    Really enjoyed the blogg, and the good pics,looks like it was a very good trip,but i don't know what your dog thought about it.
    Thank you for commenting. - She loved it - She's wasn't so happy about travelling up but travelling back she hardley moved off her bed she was worn out. It's lovely just to be able to let her wander about and leave the tent in the morining without chasing after her. It's like one long walk. She was so tired one day she fell asleep sitting in the canoe. I'll add some more in about her next time.

  25. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patterdale Paddler View Post
    Well done....cracking blog with some lovely photos.......from a fellow Tentipi owner.
    Thank you. Cracking tents, made of good stuff. A quick question - Did you bother with the comfort floor?- We just have a tarp at present

  26. #26
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    Really enjoyable adventure and your enthusiasm and enjoyment came across in the pics and the write up.
    Thanks for sharing.

  27. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by terry. young View Post
    Really enjoyable adventure and your enthusiasm and enjoyment came across in the pics and the write up.
    Thanks for sharing.
    Thank you Terry for taking the time to read it.

  28. #28

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    What a great blog; lots of interesting details, and beautiful pictures. Thanks for taking the time to post this.

  29. #29
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    Wonderful blog ☺
    Jealous of you eating all those chanterelles

    "Pedal five hundred miles on a bicycle and you remain basically a bourgeois; paddle a hundred in a canoe and you are already a child of nature" - Pierre Trudeau

  30. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moosehead View Post
    What a great blog; lots of interesting details, and beautiful pictures. Thanks for taking the time to post this.
    Hi Graham, Thanks for reading it. _ I had a nice visit over at the www.scottishcanoeroutes.info too thanks.

  31. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundowner View Post
    Wonderful blog ☺
    Jealous of you eating all those chanterelles
    Thank you. Yes they were rather nice. Only the second time we've found them . There don't seem to be many locally - Loads in Scotland though.

  32. #32
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    Excellent bloggage - looks like a grand trip.

    There are plenty more slices of heaven beyond the wall and I'm sure you'll be making a regular pilgrimage like the rest of us!

    P.S. That Inca certainly seems like a character (the term "mad as a box of frogs" springs to mind!
    There's a Bluebird in my heart

  33. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja Pirate View Post
    Excellent bloggage - looks like a grand trip.

    There are plenty more slices of heaven beyond the wall and I'm sure you'll be making a regular pilgrimage like the rest of us!

    P.S. That Inca certainly seems like a character (the term "mad as a box of frogs" springs to mind!
    Thank you. I am sure there are. We also did the Broads this year and are off to Bala Lake with a few friends shortly. Can't wait to get out canoe camping again though. Yes she's a nutter alright but we love her.

  34. #34
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    Great stuff.
    A weekend of wet weather and chores awaits.... so a good read and some escapism before I get going

    Thanks for sharing
    If I could only paddle like a doggie oughta paddle

  35. #35
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    Excellent blog Ant. Looks like you had a great time. I particularly like your camp set up.

    If anyone is unsure of how to pack a canoe for multiple people just have a look at Lynne's blogs. Two adults, two dogs, an eight year old plus camping gear and food for a week all in a Wenonah 16. We had to resort to a 17' canoe but then we do have two adults, a seven and a five year old plus geat and food.
    Bootstrap
    There's no such thing as inclement weather - you're just incorrectly dressed

  36. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bob View Post
    Excellent blog Ant. Looks like you had a great time. I particularly like your camp set up..
    Thank you, we and we will remember it for s long time. The set up wasn't cheep but we've already had our money's worth. We can't wait for more adventures.

  37. #37
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    Most Inspiring. Loved it!!
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!

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    An excellent blog and most inspiring.
    Scotland is a fair old trip from the south but always worth the effort.

    Simon

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    Quote Originally Posted by Graywolf View Post
    Most Inspiring. Loved it!!
    Thank you

  40. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silent View Post
    An excellent blog and most inspiring.
    Scotland is a fair old trip from the south but always worth the effort.

    Simon
    Yes it's quite a trek - and the weather is a bit unpredicatble, although still quite spectacular in the rain

  41. #41
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    Excellent post. I drive a Punto too, but I am not comfortable fitting my 18 ft 38 kg canoe on the roof. We have a Zafira for that...
    --
    Martin
    Caesar si viveret, ad remum dareris (If Caesar were alive, you'd be chained to an oar).

  42. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by phonkee View Post
    Excellent post. I drive a Punto too, but I am not comfortable fitting my 18 ft 38 kg canoe on the roof. We have a Zafira for that...
    Haha I know what you mean but our other choice is a mini you have an extra 2ft too .

  43. #43
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    Wonderful first blog, thanks for sharing. Hopefully the first of many such adventures.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

    Paddle Points - where to paddle

  44. #44
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    Parked up in my van next to Loch Lomond this evening. Flat as a pancake. Let's see what the morning brings. If not I'll head up to Morar and aross to Knoydart.
    I've got the River Cottage - Mushrooms book. Looking forward to some chanterelles.

  45. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Paddle Man View Post
    Parked up in my van next to Loch Lomond this evening. Flat as a pancake. Let's see what the morning brings. If not I'll head up to Morar and aross to Knoydart.
    I've got the River Cottage - Mushrooms book. Looking forward to some chanterelles.
    hope you have a wonderful time. I Have to say the usual don't eat any unless you are 100% sure on the ID. Happy hunting.

  46. #46
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    What app are you using on your phone for the maps?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  47. #47

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    Wiciloc is a great app used it 4x4 ing through Portugal you don't need signal of you pre download the map of the area


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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripvanwinkle View Post
    Wiciloc is a great app used it 4x4 ing through Portugal you don't need signal of you pre download the map of the area


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thanks I will take a look at that


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  49. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by euroben View Post
    What app are you using on your phone for the maps?


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    we use view ranger. We buy os tiles where we needed them. It's a really usual app.

  50. #50
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    ~Kirkintolloch, Glasgow
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    813

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    One minor word of caution. Because of the bad habits of some of the ignorant NED "Campers" the park authority in their infinite wisdom have created a by-law banning camping for the summer months on the East side of the loch.

    http://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/.../wild-camping/

    I expect it will be one of those public nuisance type issues where if the Rangers are contacted about some concern they have to turn up and now have instant access to law - previously they needed a range of evidence and had to argue the case in court, now it's simply 'you were there, camping, you are banged to rights, pay up'.

    Low key camping, well out of the way of the normal hordes has a low likelihood of being a problem, but its worth noting.

  51. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by philipoakley View Post
    One minor word of caution. Because of the bad habits of some of the ignorant NED "Campers" the park authority in their infinite wisdom have created a by-law banning camping for the summer months on the East side of the loch.

    http://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/.../wild-camping/

    I expect it will be one of those public nuisance type issues where if the Rangers are contacted about some concern they have to turn up and now have instant access to law - previously they needed a range of evidence and had to argue the case in court, now it's simply 'you were there, camping, you are banged to rights, pay up'.

    Low key camping, well out of the way of the normal hordes has a low likelihood of being a problem, but its worth noting.
    That is is a very good point. We will add that to our website blog. We were aware of this and where we went was outside the exclusion zone. Thanks for flagging that up.

  52. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    ~Kirkintolloch, Glasgow
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    Also, there is some new regulations for next year apparently, which affects a load more of the Trossach's Lochs. e.g. see http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=70227
    Last edited by philipoakley; 5th-September-2016 at 09:55 PM. Reason: spilling;-)

  53. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by philipoakley View Post
    Also, there is some new regulations for next year apparently, which affects a load more of the Trossach's Lochs. e.g. see http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=70227
    That good info too. Thanks. We don't need any more exclusion zones - Scotland is one place where you can feel free.
    If only people would take their rubbish with them.

  54. #54

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    Great stuff feeling inspired


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  55. #55

  56. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    650

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    Blog was great - I have nothing to add to that that hasn't been said more eloquently dozens of times already however, I do have a question: what is the particular appeal of the wooden crate? Is it look & / or practical over & above dry bags or barrels? Just curious.
    Also have suggestion re: coffee - have you tried an Aeropress? I have used one in all sorts of places -- it makes fantastic coffee, is simple, easy to clean, virtually indestructible and, if the paper filters seem like a bad idea when out in the wild you can buy a stainless steel filter for the minor inconvenience of having to clean it!! Highly recommended.

    Pete
    When I read about the evils of drinking I gave up reading.

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