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Thread: Polish Forest Adventure on the River Obra

  1. #1
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    Default Polish Forest Adventure on the River Obra

    Introduction

    In May 2016 Robbie (of the Ginger Paddlers) and Andy (Chaffinch) explored the River Obra in Western Poland, paddling for 5-days through primitive forests, peaceful lakes, watching spectacular wildlife and seeing remarkable historical sites. This blog tells the story of our journey and is written to give you a small taste of the joy and wonder we experienced paddling this amazing river and, if after reading it you fancy your own trip, we hope to give you enough info to help you start planning your Obra Adventure.





    Back in 2011 Andy and his friend Chris had a wonderful trip on the River Obra. Robbie was so impressed with the tales and photos of their expedition that he promised himself the chance to see this beautiful region for himself one day. During the dark winter months of early 2016, Andy and Robbie agreed that the time was right for another trip on the Obra; one of Europe’s finest canoeing rivers.




    After reading Crow’s excellent blog from his visit to Poland in 2015 we made contact with Roy and Cecylia of Anglo-Polish Holidays. We immediately hit it off with this wonderful couple and, as fellow canoeists with excellent links into the local community, they showed a real commitment to helping us plan our expedition and get the most from our time and budget.




    To explain everything they did to help us would be a story in itself, suffice to say that they: arranged for a canoe to be supplied to us from a local outfitter for the 5 day trip and for the 40 mile shuttle to our start point; they sourced gas for our stoves; provided advice during a shopping trip to purchase food locally for our trip; offered guidance on our route and possible bivouac sites; provided our airport transfers; and, laid on luxurious board and lodgings at the start and end of our trip. Genuinely a 5-star service!




    After meeting up at Robbie’s house the night before to do some final kit checks, an early morning taxi got us to Glasgow Airport for our WizzAir flight to Poznań. After a sprint to the departure gate (Robbie had spent too long in Duty Free!) and a comfortable two hour flight alongside many happy Poles returning home for their holidays, we were met at Poznań Airport by a smiling Roy ready to help us load our bags into his sumptuous Range Rover.




    A leisurely 90-minute drive through the spring countryside en route to Roy and Cecylia’s holiday house in Chycina gave us a taste of what we had in store. White storks and common cranes feeding in the fields, and red kites, honey buzzards and white tailed eagles wheeling in the skies made us realise that we were in for a treat. Roy’s commentary on what we were seeing helped the journey fly by. In no time we were pulling off the cobbled road into Chycina onto the short forest track that leads to their lakeside house.

    We were greeted by Cecylia and their two friendly dogs, Poppy and Tigger, and before we knew it we were sat down in their garden for a tasty lunch followed by fresh coffee and homemade cakes. An afternoon trip to the Tesco in nearby town of Międzyrzecz, guided by Cecylia’s perfect Polish translations, saw us stocked up and ready for the adventure that lay ahead.





    Day 1 – Zbąszyń to Lake Wielkie (16 km paddled)





    After a hearty breakfast cooked by Roy and Cecylia, they drove us to meet Stanisław, our canoe supplier, at his yard in a nearby village. With Cecylia translating, Stanisław showed us our boat, an Old Town Penobscot, and then loaded it onto one of his trucks for the journey to the drop-off point.





    Waving farewell to Roy and Cecylia, we set off with one of Stanisław’s staff on the drive to our start point. 45-minutes later we pulled into the hamlet of Strzyżewo-Piaski, 2 km north of the town of Zbąszyń, where we unloaded and prepped our kit ready for launch.





    Lacking a bottle of champagne to launch our vessel, we instead popped a couple of cans of Zubr, possibly the roughest beer in Poland, and set off on our adventure. Note – Polish beer is normally excellent, but Zubr is truly the exception to the rule!




    This first section of river was a delight for getting a feel for our boat’s handling and settling ourselves into a rhythm for tandem paddling. Large expanses of reed beds lined a clear river channel, with reed and sedge warblers providing a soundtrack with their rasping calls.




    The sparse trees lining this part of the river were laden with mistletoe. Sadly, neither of us was a good enough tree climber to collect some to take back home to our respective ladies in Scotland.




    As we passed the bivouac site just beyond the village of Strzyżewo that had been Andy’s start point in 2011, the river narrowed and our first section of forest paddling began.





    We started to see lots of damaged trees and the cause became evident as we paddled past a beaver lodge.




    After paddling around 4 km from our start point we entered Lake Lutol, the first significant open water of our trip.




    Under beautiful skies and with a pleasant cooling breeze we entered this stunning lake, enjoying the longer sight lines than had been the case on the initial river sections.




    The paddling was a delight, and Andy was quickly falling in love again with the Polish countryside.





    We decided it was time for lunch, so pulled over to a bivouac site on the lake’s western shore. On a picnic bench, a lunch of lightly fried smoked polish sausage and pierogi (Polish ravioli) was quickly served up with another Zubr – well the beer wasn’t going to drink itself!




    Well fed and rested after our break, we were quickly back on the water. We soon passed under the motorway linking Berlin with Warsaw. Designed with wildlife in mind, the bridge was fitted with screens to help prevent birds being killed by passing traffic.




    After another couple of kilometres of paddling, passing through some wider sections of river, we entered Lake Młyńskie. As we entered the lake we could see the signs of habitation in the distance; the spire of a church at the far end.





    As we neared the head of the lake we approached the pretty village of Trzciel. Turning in towards the village we passed under a low road bridge with many swallows buzzing around underneath.




    Just beyond the bridge we pulled up at a concrete jetty designed especially for paddlers. We were starting to become really quite impressed with how good the Polish authorities were at providing supporting infrastructure for canoeists and kayakers.





    A short stroll through this tidy village revealed a beautiful church surrounded by landscaped gardens.





    Man cannot live on scenery alone, so the first Cornetto of the trip was called for.





    Back on the water we were soon being deafened by astronomical numbers of croaking frogs calling from the reed beds lining the river banks. Just as we were getting used to this we heard a bittern with its unique booming call from just ahead of us near the entrance to Lake Wielkie. The river widened into a series of pretty interlinked ponds before entering the main part of the lake.





    The lake held amazing numbers of birds. In the skies up above red kites wheeled, cormorants skimmed the lake surface and great crested grebes cruised gracefully in courting couples on the lake’s surface.





    With a little weariness starting to set in, we decided to find somewhere on the lakeside to camp for the night. On a peninsula on the lake’s northern shore we found the perfect spot to pull out and set up our hammocks. Robbie had never used a hammock before but, MagiKelly’s tales of their unrivalled comfort had convinced him to give in a try on this trip. The loan of the necessary kit from MagiKelly was much appreciated, as was the set up guidance he provided before the trip, so with only a little bit of additional help from Andy (an experienced hammock user), our beds for the night were set up in no time.





    A fantastic dinner of goulash and fresh bread refuelled us after a good day’s paddling and a gentle breeze kept any mosquitoes at bay.





    As the sun set on our first paddling day, we reflected on the excellent progress we’d made and the amazing sights we’d already seen. What more wonders did Poland have in store for us?




    Day 2 – Lake Wielkie to Lake Żółwin (21 km paddled)





    The dawn chorus broke with a cacophony we’ve never experienced in the UK. Song birds by the hundreds, challenged frogs by the thousands to a sonic duel. Common cranes trumpeted their prehistoric-sounding flute call whilst bitterns boomed, golden orioles warbled, woodpeckers drummed and cuckoos did what cuckoos do! After a breakfast of rolled oats and dried fruit & nuts brought to the boil with a carton of UHT milk, accompanied by a couple of cups of coffee, it was time to break camp and head out for another day on the water.





    A kilometre of easy flat water paddling took us across the final section of Lake Wielkie and into the mouth of the River Obra.








    Passing two common cranes trumpeting in a field next to the river’s mouth, we approached a small bridge where we saw many cars parked nearby; an unusual sight in such a remote location. The reason for this gathering became clear as the river banks were lined with fishermen sat next to numbered posts, apparently taking part in an angling competition. They were cheery enough as we gently paddled through their ranks, pulling in their lines as we approached and re-casting behind us.





    We now entered one of the most remote sections of the river. For the next 10 kilometres we would be well away from any roads and almost all habitation. The river took on an alternating character of thick shaded forest close to the river bank and then broad reed beds bathed in bright sunlight.





    After an hour or so, we stopped for a leg stretch and to ensure we had a good drink of water to make up for the sweat we were losing from paddling in 25 degree heat. A short stroll through some conifers took us into the remains of German trench lines from WW2, when this river formed an important natural obstacle, fortified against the Red Army’s advance on Berlin. In such peaceful surroundings, the juxtaposition with the area’s violent history was striking.





    Back on the water we were soon being near deafened by the croaking of frogs. We had to speak up to be heard over the astonishing noise coming from the reeds lining the riverside.





    Looking up from the frogs, we admired a red kite circling overhead and watched two marsh harriers quarter back and forth as they hunted above the reed beds. The red kites were truly one of the highlights of the trip, and this one in particular wheeled above us in lazy circuits for several minutes before gliding off in search of an easier meal elsewhere.





    After another hour we were starting to feel peckish, so pulled over at the Rańsko bivouac site for lunch. Like many others on the route, this bivouac site is set up by the local authority and is provided with a couple of picnic benches, a bin and a composting toilet at no charge to its users. All of them seemed to be fairly well maintained, with the toilets being clean and the bins being emptied regularly.





    The evidence of hungry beavers was evident everywhere, even here within a matter of metres from the nearby Rańsko farmhouse.





    After a hearty lunch of sausage, pierogi and beer we felt ready to press on and make the most of the perfect conditions.





    As we broke free of this section of forest we approached the village of Policko.





    For the next few kilometres the river meandered gently through a mix of forest and farmland. The call of buzzards seemed ever present as they wheeled above the river searching out prey in the afternoon sunshine. The wild sections of woodland held many strangely shaped trees and some fabulous fungi.








    Sometimes we would just stop paddling and drift, savouring the dappled light filtering through the branches above us.





    Just short of the village of Żółwin a country road, the first we’d seen for many hours, appeared on an embankment on the right hand side of the river. Under a small wood-planked bridge we found a channel leading off the river and into Lake Żółwin, our final objective for the day. Lifting the boat over a small 30 cm high weir under the bridge we were soon out onto yet another stunningly beautiful lake.





    Paddling 500 metres along the western shore we landed at a bivouac site on a promontory that caught a cooling breeze. Pulling our boat out next to a friendly fisherman, we scouted around and found a suitable spot for our tents. Dinner and evening drinks were served on one of the many fishing jetties that lined the lake.





    An evening of cheery banter was had before we finally called a halt and retired to our tents for a well earned rest.





    Day 3 – Lake Żółwin to Gorzyca (21 km paddled)





    Morning dawned bright and clear with another loud chorus from the local wildlife.





    As we prepared breakfast a commotion broke out in the branches of a pine tree above our camp. Two hooded crows were diving and screeching around the tree top – something was clearly attacking their nest. In a moment we were both left open-mouthed as a pine marten climbed out from their nest and started leaping away from branch to branch. Once the crows calmed down, the pine marten stopped to take in its surroundings, only to find that it was only a matter of metres directly above our tents. We were then stunned when rather than sprint off, it calmly started to groom itself for almost 5 minutes whilst watching two flabbergasted paddlers below. Truly the wildlife spot of the trip – or so we thought!





    After breakfast we broke camp and were back on the water in short order. Leaving the lake and rejoining the Obra, we made good time paddling a pleasant section of river with few obstacles.





    As we paddled on, the character of the river came to the fore with many odd shaped trees.





    The local beavers had been busy here. Fortunately, the trees they’d felled were fairly straightforward to get past.





    By late morning we were approaching the outskirts of the town of Międzyrzecz. Rustling in the undergrowth next to the river revealed a wild boar, and then another wild boar and then a whole family of stripy hoglets. As soon as they saw us, they were off careening through the trees and disappeared into the distance. No sooner had we composed ourselves from seeing these amazing animals before we rounded a corner to see a train awaiting a signal change before it moved off.





    As we cruised into the town we felt a degree of shock from experiencing the sights, sounds and smells of urban living. A pretty town, with some impressive buildings, passed by and we decided to stop for a break in the town centre. Pulling out next to the town’s war memorial, Robbie struck out to find a shop to buy a resupply of bottled water. Delight followed his return when he arrived not only with water, but with yet another brace of Cornettos.





    Back on the water for a few hundred metres saw the town’s ancient Teutonic castle dating from 1350 come into view. We decided to stop and take the opportunity to explore it and the wooden carved figures in the gardens surrounding it.

















    Paddling on for another couple of kilometres, we passed under the new E65 motorway. A little beyond this we saw a pretty little church dating from 1768 in the village of Święty Wojciech. No sooner had we passed this, when movement on the riverbank drew our eye and imagine our surprise to see six tiny fox cubs blinking in the sunlight outside their earth no more than 3 metres from the side of our canoe. This day couldn’t get any better.





    After passing through the village, the hunger pangs got the better of us, so we pulled over onto a fishing pontoon and heated up some soup for lunch. We’d made good time so far as the going had been easy. Little did we know that as we were embarking back into the forest, the work of the local beavers would make the next few kilometres a trial of our paddling skill and patience.





    As the afternoon heat and humidity built, there was barely a breath of air to be had as we paddled through the thick forest. As flies buzzed around our heads our luck started to run out, with fallen tree after fallen tree having been dropped into the river by the beavers.





    We ducked and weaved and dragged and cursed around obstacle after obstacle. Fortunately, on only one section were we completely defeated and had to portage around a series of trees that had been felled by the hungry rodents.








    After the portage the pattern of fallen trees continued. Some of the fallen trees were a very tight squeeze to get under but, we took a perverse pride in getting past without having to get out.





    At long last we got ourselves through this difficult section and reached the welcome sight of the campsite at Gorzyca. We hauled out and pulled our gear clear of the riverside and went looking for someone to check in with. After a 15 minute walk around the local area, it was clear that there was no-one around, so we decided to pitch our tents in the hope that this would attract the attention of whoever was in charge. Eventually two chaps turned up in the oldest tractor in Poland and explained that later on we could book in and get a beer.





    After a welcome shower and a couple of chilled beers from their fridge, we settled our bill: 2 tent pitches; use of a covered cooking and eating area; use of a fire pit and all the firewood we could burn; hot showers; and, 2 cold beers .... That will be £6 please! As the only campers that night, we had the place to ourselves and all the luxury we could want.





    Eventually, even the pull of the starlit sky and campfire couldn’t hold our attention and it was time to crawl into our sleeping bags. Our sleep was rudely awakened at 1 am by another pine marten toppling the metal bin lid near our tents and then a beaver spent the rest of the night splashing up and down the river beside where we had camped. A comfortable, but not very restful night ensued.





    CONTINUED IN PART 2
    Robbie & Steph

  2. #2
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    Default Polish Forest Adventure on the River Obra - Part 2

    Day 4 – Gorzyca to Lake Chycina (19 km paddled)





    After what seemed like a noisy night, this morning’s dawn chorus was beyond anything we had heard to date. A wall of natural sound emanated from the woods and fields around us beyond all description.





    Heavy dew had fallen overnight, so we were in no rush to break camp whilst we let the early rays of the sun burn off the moisture. A short walk from our tents over a pretty little bridge took us back to the campsite facilities for another hot shower – true luxury!





    After a leisurely breakfast to set us up for our final full day of paddling we finally packed up our gear which had now dried off.





    Launching once more onto the Obra, we passed the neighbouring family campsite and then on into the forests lying downstream of Gorzyca.





    Rested and in the cool of the morning, the fallen trees seemed easier to deal with and we were able to make slow but, steady progress.





    A deep growl from undergrowth next to the river stopped us dead in our tracks. A further growl had us retreating to the opposite side of the river. We’d disturbed a lone wild boar from its morning slumbers and it clearly wanted us out of its patch. We paddled briskly away and carried on, ever so slightly more aware of our surroundings than had been the case before.





    We finally got to the causeway that marked the end of this section of river. Unable to paddle under, we pulled onto the bank and moved our boat and kit to the far side. The heat was building again, so a good drink of water followed by a beer was called for.





    As we slaked our thirst, yet another grass snake skittered across the water. They had been a fairly common sight on the river, along with small lizards, but, we got an excellent view of this one as it hunted along the water’s edge and through the tunnel in the causeway.





    From here on, the river broadened into Lake Bledzewskie. With a pleasant breeze to cool us, we welcomed the fresher air and longer views the lake offered. Halfway down, we pulled over for a bit of lunch – chilli con carne – and took stock of what we’d do next. We’d made good time, but Lake Bledzewskie seemed too developed for our tastes, with its many fishing jetties and dachas lining the shore. We decided to push on and explore the end of the lake before retracing our steps and then pushing onto Lake Chycina; the pearl of the whole Obra system.





    Before this, Lake Bledzewskie still had some sights to offer so, we paddled down to the hydroelectric power station at the end of the lake. This had been built in the 1930s to power the bunkers making up the Ost Wall and to control water levels for defensive flooding.








    Exiting the lake at its south east corner, we had a delightful late afternoon’s paddle through the channels leading from Lake Bledzewskie to Lake Chycina.








    As we broke out from the gentle dappled light of the wooded channels into the bright sunshine of the lake, we could understand why this lake in particular drew visitors by its beauty.








    We explored a couple of possible campsites before settling on a state bivouac site on the lake’s north western shore. This had an excellent pontoon jetty that later allowed us to sit in the sunshine and catch the breeze. First though, we got our kit ashore and our camp set up.




    Having stiff legs, we decided to take a stroll into the tiny village of Chycina. En route we stopped to explore the remains of a huge Ost Wall bunker that had been blown up after the end of the war.








    After buying fabulous ice creams in the shop (no Cornettos here!) we sat in the centre of the village watching the world go by for a while. A further purchase of a couple of cold beers kept us going on our stroll back to our lakeside campsite via the local churchyard for our evening meal and a well earned rest.




    Day 5 - Lake Chycina to Lake Długie (6 km paddled)





    After a great night’s sleep in the hammock, another bright clear morning dawned in our woodland campsite. Today was to have a much slower pace from previous days as we were within touching distance of the finish. For several hours we lounged on a fishing pontoon, drinking coffee and soaking up the morning sun. Our peace was briefly broken by a fox strolling through our campsite oblivious or disinterested by our presence only yards away.



    Whilst washing up our plates from our final camp breakfast, we disturbed two huge freshwater crayfish. Quickly dubbed ‘the Cray Twins’, these little armoured tanks trundled across the shallow lake bed where we had been bathing earlier.





    All good things must come to an end, so at around 11 am we loaded our boat for the final time and headed out across Lake Chycina. Skirting around the edge of this most beautiful lake, we exited its south east corner into a wooded channel leading to Lake Długie.





    This final stage came with some lovely surprises as we glided through a section of ageing canal fringed with forest-lined reed-beds. We disturbed goldeneye ducks, swans and a heron as we glided through between the lily fronds.







    All too soon we passed through a narrow steel-lined channel that marked the entrance to Lake Długie.





    We just couldn’t face this being the end of our trip, so we agreed to make a clockwise circuit of Lake Długie before landing back at Roy and Cecylia’s house. A pleasant paddle into a strengthening breeze brought us round the far end of the lake, passing the entrance to the canal leading out of the south end of the lake into Lake Kursko and on to the west side of the lake where we could see the remains of yet another Ost Wall bunker.





    At last our final destination hove into view and we could see our hosts Roy and Cecylia waiting with Tigger and Poppy on the beach to welcome us ashore. Our trip was at an end, all too soon but, what a fabulous time we had had.







    R & R

    Having completed our paddling adventure, it was nice to have some time to sort ourselves out and relax a little before our return home. Once we’d unpacked and done our laundry it was time for dinner; this time a fantastic Thai stir fry, followed by ‘Movie Night’ watching the James Bond film Spectre with Roy and Cecylia over a wee dram.

    Not content with the exercise he’d had to date, the following morning Andy was determined to make the most of the lakeside location with a swim before breakfast. Donning his wetsuit, he headed off for a couple of kilometres down the lake and back again to the beach at the end of the garden.





    After this, a delicious breakfast beckoned, and we chatted through what we fancied doing on our day off. Having come up with a plan, we climbed into the Range Rover and headed out with Roy to do a bit of local sightseeing.

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    First stop was the beautiful lakeside village of Łagów. The historic castle dates back to the era of the Teutonic Knights and is surrounded by period buildings. An ice cream and a cold glass of coke in the stunning hotel within the castle complex helped us cool down nicely.








    Then it was off to visit the bunker complex near the village of Pniewo. This is part of the Ost Wall defensive line build by the Nazis in the 1930’s to fortify their eastern border with Poland. After exploring the various pieces of military equipment on show, it was time to head off on our guided tour of the complex.





    First stop was the surface-level defences, with ‘Dragon’s Teeth’ obstacles and concrete emplacements equipped with automatic mortars and flamethrowers.








    Then it was time to head underground, descending 40 metres down an access shaft that looked like a block of flats buried into the earth.





    Emerging into large vaulted rooms, we were guided through hundreds of metres of passageways equipped with narrow-gauge railway lines. Every winter, at a steady 10 degrees Centigrade, these areas are home to tens of thousands of hibernating bats in Europe’s largest winter bat roost.





    Back on the surface, we reunited with Roy for a final stop on our tour; the former Soviet-era barracks at Kęszyca Leśna. This was the base of a signals regiment and their monument to the memory of their Red Army forebears was a striking example of the Communist-era artistic style.





    After getting back to the house, there was time for a relaxing beer in the garden, playing with the dogs in the sunshine.





    Then it was time for dinner. As a thank you for all their efforts in making our trip such a success we invited Roy and Cecylia to join us for dinner at a great little restaurant in the small town of Lubniewice. After dining on wild boar, venison and zander, followed by huge ice cream sundaes, a walk round this pretty lakeside village was in order before we headed home.

    All too soon our final morning dawned and it was time to say our farewell to Cecylia, Poppy and Tigger as we loaded our bags into the Range Rover before starting our journey to Berlin for our flight home to Scotland. Less than two hours drive got us to the airport, where we said a sad farewell to Roy and thanked him for everything he’d done for us. Our holiday was at an end but, what wonderful memories we had gained.

    Final Thoughts

    So, after this epic tale, what would be our recommendation?

    If the idea of paddling in near-solitude, through amazing and varied landscapes, viewing world-class wildlife sights, exploring fascinating history and being expertly supported throughout by ex-pat British paddlers offering great accommodation and warm hospitality, then this is the trip for you.

    How much would it cost?

    Well, all up, the total cost for all aspects of the trip (return flights, transfers, accommodation, canoe hire, food, beer, visits, Cornettos, spending money etc) was roughly £450 each. Not bad for an adventure like this.

    What next?

    Go ahead and treat yourself to your own Polish paddling escapade. Get in touch with Roy and Cecylia at Anglo-Polish Holidays and start planning your own Obra adventure. Good luck, you’ll love it – especially Cecylia’s fabulous home-made jam! We’re looking forward to reading your blog soon!


    Robbie & Steph

  3. #3
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    I too read Crows excellent blog and thought "that is a place worth a visit" at the time ...and now this ..... You come along with a brilliantly put together blog of another excellent trip there. It's clearly an excellent destination made better by the hosts and their assistance throughout.

    I for one will be seriously considering this as a destination, especially given the costs, though I've not got the advantage of lots of cheap flights.

    Excellent blog, thanks
    MarkL
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    Open Canoe hire/outfitting in the Massif Central
    ”We will make your trip work”

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    Great trip report! Thanks for sharing your adventure! It looks like a very beautiful country.
    The Adventures of the Big Red Pig ...

  5. #5
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    Looks like it was a great trip. You'll need to go back with a zoom lens camera so you can get pictures of all this wildlife

    Have you a link to Roy and Cecylia's site?
    John

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    Default Thank you!

    Many thanks for your kind comments. If you are interested in finding out more about organising your own trip, get in touch with Roy and Cecylia at www.anglo-polish-holidays.com
    Robbie & Steph

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    Hi guys.

    Excellent blog and pics. Quite a trip you had there. I recognised a lot of the places from the latter part of your journey, good to see them again. But you covered a lot more mileage (kilometrage?) than we did. Same lovely weather though.

    And I'm not surprised to see you got the same amazing hospitality and support from Roy and Cecylia - they're fantastic!

    Great to see more people going there, I'd recommend it to anyone.

    Anglo Polish Holidays, folks, go for it!

    [No connection. This is an independent endorsement. I tried to get them to pay me an honorarium in bitcoins, but they weren't having it. ]

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    Great Blogg. Excel;lent weather and all for a fraction of the cost of an 'ordinary holiday'
    http://www.davidwperry.blogspot.co.uk/

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    Superb blog, great narration and images. This has been on my radar for a few years now, its only a matter of time before I actially get round to it, especially with blogs like this to inspire me.
    Paddler,blogger,camper,pyromaniac: Blog: Wilderness is a State of Mind

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    A great blog and some wonderful scenery there. Well done chaps.
    Bootstrap
    There's no such thing as inclement weather - you're just incorrectly dressed

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    Superb looking trip!
    Cheers,

    Alan


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    Looks fantastic and well worth the trip.
    In my mind my image of Poland is coloured by news reports from the '80's about Lech Walesa and Solidarity in drab weather and drab industrial areas and post war cities. It's nice to see another aspect of the country. Thanks for posting.

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    Great blogg!
    --
    Martin
    Caesar si viveret, ad remum dareris (If Caesar were alive, you'd be chained to an oar).

  14. #14
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    Hi Gordon,
    I am sure I could find you a bit of a coin, if that will do?

    Thank you for your kind words

    Roy

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    Looks really good and great value for money to boot!

    Thanks for posting
    Cheers
    Tim


    Paddles a Prospector

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    Inspirational blogg - after reading it (along with the 'guidance' on costs), makes me want to plans something similar for next year with a mate.
    Death is natures way of telling you to slow down.

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    Wow! Great Blog.
    It is easy to see, by all the excellent pictures, that you had a really great time.

    It was our pleasure to assist in making the trip an enjoyable one. Sorry about the Zubr!

    This place is just so beautiful, it often comes as a surprise to some people who have a preconceived idea of what they think Poland is like.
    We benefit from four very properly distinct seasons and all are stunning in their own different ways. . Spring is lovely when you see winter being finally relegated giving way to and explosion of fresh green. Summer can offer temperatures in the low forties Centigrade. Autumn is just a riot of seasonal colour and jaw dropping beauty. Winter? Winter wonderland more like! Can be cold but it is a dry cold. A hat scarf and gloves keep out the cold while you go out to play in the snow.
    Mmm, I knew we moved here for a reason!

    £450.00 each eh? I wonder what percentage of that cost was attributed to the purchasing of Cornettos.

    Funny thing, hindsight. Imagine how different it could have been had you not started with the Zubr beer, bearing in mind that you had to use an 8 pack of the good stuff to prop up a broken seat after a couple of days paddling, and were thus robbed of this important refreshing and nutritious beverage.

    Thanks for all the kind words.

    Roy

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    For the record, this was our trip to Roy And Cecylia's last year:

    http://www.songofthepaddle.co.uk/for...-Day-in-Poland

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    Ein sehr schöner Reisebericht!

    I live in Berlin, so the River Obra is one of my favorite rivers for few-days-trips. But I have never seen so much of the wildlife during one visit - really nice to read what luck you had.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartaner View Post
    Ein sehr schöner Reisebericht!

    I live in Berlin, so the River Obra is one of my favorite rivers for few-days-trips. But I have never seen so much of the wildlife during one visit - really nice to read what luck you had.
    Yes, somebody said to us that it was fairly easy to reach that part of Poland from Berlin. In fact, flying to Berlin could be an option for getting there from the UK.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    Yes, somebody said to us that it was fairly easy to reach that part of Poland from Berlin. In fact, flying to Berlin could be an option for getting there from the UK.
    Interesting from France too mate
    MarkL
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkL View Post
    Interesting from France too mate
    Short drive for you, Mark.

    I think you'd love it there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    Short drive for you, Mark.

    I think you'd love it there.
    checked it already ... Just short of 18 hours
    MarkL
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    a fabulous trip on a wonderful river.Paddles tents beer and sausage. cant beat it.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkL View Post
    checked it already ... Just short of 18 hours

    That's a short step for MarkL, but a giant leap for mankind!

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    Great write up of what looks like a great trip. Thanks for all the info.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow View Post
    That's a short step for MarkL, but a giant leap for mankind!
    I may "go boldly" at some point
    MarkL
    www.canoemassifcentral.com
    Open Canoe hire/outfitting in the Massif Central
    ”We will make your trip work”

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    Great stuff! Looks a lovely place and thoroughly enjoyed the blog. Thanks.
    If I could only paddle like a doggie oughta paddle

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    Very nice, I think autum would be a good time, to visit, clear crisp days, no insects I suspect? Anyway terrific blog, thanks for posting

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    Wow , looks absolutely stunning and the history as well just brilliant

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    Well that's this year's paddling trip planned and booked. Heading back out to Poland at the end of April to paddle the River Pilawa, 100 miles south west of Gdansk. It's a bit more remote than the Obra, with much of its 50 miles running through dense forests that were part of a now-abandoned Soviet military training area. Can't wait!
    Robbie & Steph

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    Look forward to reading about it.

    Have a great trip!

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    May be the ice on the rivers will have gone in the end of April.

    In the middle of April 2012 we still had some ice along the banks (of river Brda, near river Pilawa) (photo ff.).

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    Hi Crow & Spartaner,

    Thanks for your good wishes. The photos of your trip on the Brda look great. Last year when we paddled the Obra in early May there were a fair number of mosquitoes, so we're hoping that going in the last week in April will mean we're more likely to be mozzie-free.
    Robbie & Steph

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